#1
Okay so I'm trying to play over the following chord changes, which are quite a bit more advanced than what I have done before, but I don't think it's out of reach and neither does my guitar teacher.

Summertime

Gm7|---|---|---|

Cm7|---|D7|Eb7 D7|

Gm7|Am7 D7#9|Gm7|Cm7 F7|

Bb7 Eb7|D7#9|Gm7|Eb7 D7#9|

What I've been doing is G minor with a sharp 6 accidental (for flavor) first four bars, flat the six for the next two, G harmonic minor over the D7, highlight the Db in Eb7.
The first ii V I I'm confused about. The second I just play Bb major (G minor), flat the seventh (Ab) for the Bb7, then the third (Db) over the Eb7. Then I get confused again.

Any help would be appreciated.
#2
the first thing you should do is simplify the changes. for soloing purposes I'd begin by removing all of the ii chords in the ii V relationships (so the Am7-D7 bar just think d7, same with the cm7 f7 bar, and the Bb7-Eb7). next I'd work on changing the tritone sub chords to regular dominants and removing any excess turnarounds and secondary dominants. this would give you the following set of changes, which is MUCH easier to work with, and a better guideline to playing the tune with other people (as with live jazz, changes are subject to change, so its usually good to get a very basic set down, and then work on figuring out different substitutions you can use, rather then just memorize changes off a sheet that are more often then not some arranger's pet chord substitutions. basically what you want is a bare bones guide of the tune when your first learning it) :

gm7/gm7/gm7/gm7
cm7/cm7/D7/D7/
gm7/D7/Gm7/Gm7
D7/D7/Gm7/D7.
then try to play the third of each chord only, then the seventh of each chord, practice running up the arpeggio and down the chord/scale for each chord and eventually playing through the changes in constant quarter and eighth notes, until these changes are ingrained in your ears. then add in the chords I took out and do the same thing. once you know the tune pretty well, talk to your teacher about additional chords and cycles you can add in.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Apr 9, 2012,
#3
This tune is a variation on a minor blues, for example in the second row e.g. |D7|Eb7 D7| this is just a variation on a minor 2-5-1 and can be viewed as | a-7b5 | d7b9 | G-7 |

you can improvise the tune using:
G minor pentatonic/blues scale
Chord tones
G melodic minor
G dorian (CST)
I also like to use side stepping for creating tension leading to the C-7
you also can use chromatic for connecting the guide tones.

I think this tune is really rooted in the blues and the solo should reflect this.

here is a recording of the tune I did a while back it may give you some ideas
http://www.box.com/shared/ocedyxmf8z
#4
Quote by tehREALcaptain
the first thing you should do is simplify the changes. for soloing purposes I'd begin by removing all of the ii chords in the ii V relationships (so the Am7-D7 bar just think d7, same with the cm7 f7 bar, and the Bb7-Eb7). next I'd work on changing the tritone sub chords to regular dominants and removing any excess turnarounds and secondary dominants. this would give you the following set of changes, which is MUCH easier to work with, and a better guideline to playing the tune with other people (as with live jazz, changes are subject to change, so its usually good to get a very basic set down, and then work on figuring out different substitutions you can use, rather then just memorize changes off a sheet that are more often then not some arranger's pet chord substitutions. basically what you want is a bare bones guide of the tune when your first learning it) :

gm7/gm7/gm7/gm7
cm7/cm7/D7/D7/
gm7/D7/Gm7/Gm7
D7/D7/Gm7/D7.
then try to play the third of each chord only, then the seventh of each chord, practice running up the arpeggio and down the chord/scale for each chord and eventually playing through the changes in constant quarter and eighth notes, until these changes are ingrained in your ears. then add in the chords I took out and do the same thing. once you know the tune pretty well, talk to your teacher about additional chords and cycles you can add in.


Nailed it - and I especially like that you raised the point about simplifying that analysis on the ii V because that observation right there is something a lot of people miss - and I hope people take note because this is a gem of a suggestion that can help a lot of people, when they play.

Best,

Sean