#1
Hey guys, I need help for the first pair of microphones I'll be buying for home recording.
My budget is $150AU, I won't be going any higher because this is as much as I want to spend.
The only ideas I have so far are:
http://www.mxlmics.com/microphones/studio/550-551/
http://www.behringer.com/EN/Products/C-2.aspx
http://www.zzounds.com/item--AUTAT2041

Thoughts?

*EDIT:
I just forgot to say what I had in mind with recoridng!
Basically, I need to be versatile. I only have a Steinberg CI1 so that's two XLR inputs.
I thought getting a "budget" pair would be the best/cheapest/easiest way for me to record, remember, I'm using these things to learn.
So, I'd mostly be doing acoustic guitar, vocals, ambient noises, piano, guitar/bass amps and possibly other instruments.
For reference, I help record my friend's solo project Eur.
This was done entirely by using Garageband, my Steinberg and 1995 MIJ Jaguar.
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Last edited by Rubixcuba at Apr 9, 2012,
#2
First question...do you have an interface and what will you be recording?

If you are good at EQing a good budget vocal mic is a behringer C-1 I got one 2 or 3 years ago (and picked up another last year), but wih that said you have to learn to EQ it because of its frequency response. The raw signal isnt the best but can be cleaned up nicely.

There is not much else if anything I would buy in its price range.

An SM57 is good for micing an electric guitar. If your doing acoustic you will want another LDC.
Last edited by FireHawk at Apr 9, 2012,
#3
What are you intending to mic? Guitar +amp? Acoustic? Acoustic with lineout to amp (probably want a DI instead)? Voice? Bass? Drums?

I would say if you're on a limited budget then buy 1 mic, buy an SM57.
They're one of the most reliable bits of kit you'll come across, can handle lots of volume from amps, handle instruments well (used in pro studios on guitars and snares) and will do voice pretty solidly as well (used lecterns at major conferences).

http://www.shopbot.com.au/pp-shure-sm57-price-51499.html
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#4
I love SM57s, I've used them live and at my school's recording studio. They are definitely on my list.

Going back, the C-1 seems impressive with some of the results I've heard considering they're about $50.

I intend on mic'ing whatever there is at the time, so it could be anything. The purpose of my setup is so that it can be portable and produce useable results.
I mean, I could be doing a podcast for my friend(s) or recording a acoustic guitar track, something with multiple layers like vocals, guitar, bass.
I guess I what it to be versatile as possible, but that might be asking for too much.
Quote by Spartan070sarge
Rubixcuba. I like that.

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Orange amps FTW!
#5
Quote by Rubixcuba

Going back, the C-1 seems impressive with some of the results I've heard considering they're about $50.


Mind you they don't sound great without some EQ work.

My favorite song I have done with the C-1 is this (note: vocals have a filter on them until the chorus and I think that is where the vocals sound good with the C-1)
#6
Hmm, I wondering if it would just be better to get a single, more high end, condenser microphone?
http://amzn.to/HwDGYO
http://amzn.to/HZhgfa
Juts some examples.
Quote by Spartan070sarge
Rubixcuba. I like that.

Quote by Fenderhippie69
Orange amps FTW!
Last edited by Rubixcuba at Apr 10, 2012,
#7
#8
Quote by kyle62
NO!

For god's sake, ewnough of the SM57 worship. "So, I'd mostly be doing acoustic guitar, vocals, ambient noises, piano"....

The SM57 is good for none of these.


You're right, but at the time he had stated none of these things. If you want an all round mic for around £70 new that will do a decent job of electric guitars and that won't break in a hurry then you can do much worse.

That said a 57 doesn't suit his needs - and knowing he has some experience, is willing to go used and has a mixer which will give out phantom power (not a guarantee for someone buying their first mic) make it a very different choice.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#9
Quote by Spartan070sarge
Rubixcuba. I like that.

Quote by Fenderhippie69
Orange amps FTW!
Last edited by Rubixcuba at Apr 13, 2012,
#10
I think the main issue is trying to find a mic that does a little bit of everything.

I'm honestly not sure if such a thing exists.
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#11
Quote by ChemicalFire
I think the main issue is trying to find a mic that does a little bit of everything.

I'm honestly not sure if such a thing exists.

I know, my God, I'm researching this too much.

I'll just get a SM57 and mic my amp.
Quote by Spartan070sarge
Rubixcuba. I like that.

Quote by Fenderhippie69
Orange amps FTW!
#12
A) Buy two Shure SM57's (about $80 a pop)
B) Buy ONE Shure small diaphragm condenser

Option A will be the more flexible option for you, and probably the direction I'd take UNLESS you have an interface (and/or a mixing console) with phantom power. You will need to pick up condensers eventually, but if you are asking yourself a question like, "What's phantom power?" then go with Option A!!!
#13
The ST50/30 from sterling is cheaper and probably a better option. I have the ST59 and it's great for a lot of different things, I use it for pretty much every school project I do haha
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#14
I just picked up an SM57 a few days ago, I highly recommend it if mainly using an electric guitar.
#15
Quote by Floss Ninja
A) Buy two Shure SM57's (about $80 a pop)
B) Buy ONE Shure small diaphragm condenser

Option A will be the more flexible option for you, and probably the direction I'd take UNLESS you have an interface (and/or a mixing console) with phantom power. You will need to pick up condensers eventually, but if you are asking yourself a question like, "What's phantom power?" then go with Option A!!!

Frankly, this is bad advice.