#1
Hey I'm wanting to get some new pickups for my start that would be suited for blues. I have an ibanez with EMG 81 85 which is fine for metal and such but isnt ideal for texas blues style. I was thinking of getting a new guitar maybe a telecaster or something along those lines, but then thought it would be cheaper just to improve my old strat (and its my first guitar so its sentimental aswell ).

Its just the usual single coil bridge, middle and neck pickups.

Any suggestions would be great,

Thanks, Jonny Ford.
#3
find out what the blues players used. SRV - Texas Specials, Clapton - Lace Sensors, Hendrix - Custom Shop 69' is probably as close as you'll get. Maybe you could put some '57 Gibson Humbuckers in your Ibanez like are in the Gibson ES 335.
#5
I have texas specials in my strat and i love em!!
Gear!!!!

Fender Lonestar Stratocaster w/ Seymour Duncan pearly Gates!!!
PRS SE Custom 24 Vintage Natural
Gibson Les Paul Signature T Trans Ebony
Engl Screamer 50
#6
depends on what your idea of a good blues tone is. usually low output pups are used as you aren't looking for a ton of gain. look at Fender Texas specails or perhaps Lace Sensor golds.
#8
Reaching for my flame shield here, but you can get passable blues tone from EMGs, you'd have to turn the volume pot down and play with your amp settings, it certainly wouldn't compare to some nice Blues specific pups, but it would sound alright.
#9
I have a Marshall AVT275, my budget is about £200, and I will have a look at these Texas Specials.
#10
With 200 quid, you could get yourself a used Laney VC15, which would do much more for your blues-tones than a new set of pups. The Texas Specials are single coils, anyway, so wouldn't fit into a guitar routed for humbuckers (unless your guitar has a pickguard, which you could swap).
#11
The guitar i am get pickups for is the strat not the ibanez i'm keeping that one as it is. So i need single coil pickups.
#12
What model of strat is it? Unless it's really really crappy, it should get you a decent blues tone through a halfway appropriate amp.

And well, there is no point in ignoring the elephant in the room: An AVT isn't a terribly good amp. There's some usable modern rock distortion in there, but apart from that... not worth the trouble. New pups won't make it much bluesier.
#13
I know the amp isn't the greatest but I'm not gigging with it or anything so it''s fine for when I'm just jamming. The pickups I have are basically knackered if you whistle or talk loud into them you can hear it come out of the amp they are terrible. So I just need a good set of pickups.
#14
Quote by Jonny Ford
I know the amp isn't the greatest but I'm not gigging with it or anything so it''s fine for when I'm just jamming.

That line is pure bull. You want good tone, you need a good amp. There is no way around it. Even for home use, good tone is worth having and makes playing more fun. It's not even expensive when you know what to look for. But that's neither here nor there...


... now for the actual advice:

1) If your strat's pups are broken, you need new ones. If you aren't going to upgrade your amp at some point though, pouring lots of cash into expensive pups seems like a waste. So something more affordable like GFS pups might be worth a shot. AVTs honestly aren't that sensible to what you put in; a great set of pups won't sound much different from a mediocre one.


2) if you're going to upgrade the amp at some point, you might go for something really nice indeed. The Fender Texas Specials or a set of Fender '69s would be worth looking into. They're fat and warm for single coils, great for bluesy stuff, but they also hit rock tones if need be.
Personally, I got a couple of Leosounds Red House pups a few months ago and I recommend them for what you want to do. Hands down some of the nicest pups I've played, and they're incredibly cheap for hand-made pickups. Here's the Leousounds site, if you are interested:
http://leosounds.de/EN/index.html
They've got a bunch of different models, but I think the Red House might really be what you're looking for. Only thing to take note of is that the spacing is vintage-correct, meaning the spacing will be the same on all three pups of a set, leading to the neck and middle looking too wide (pole-pieces won't be perfectly alligned with the strings). It doesn't seem to have an impact on the function though. Mine, at least, sound fine.