#1
Howdy,

I feel I should change the string gauge I use from 9's to 10's.

To do so what will I have to do to my guitar? If any thing?

This is for the Jackson mentioned in my sig.

I know I will have to tweak the springs for the tremolo. Will I have to do any thing else?

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Next. Does any one have experience with this site? How reliable is it?

http://www.stringsdirect.co.uk/strings/electric_guitar/1?&&order=top-sellers
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Finally.

Is it risky getting their 3 packs of strings discount in case I do not like them? Its a good deal money wise.

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Thanks
#2
Loosen the springs abit so the action gets how you like then check if it's still intonated, it's probably worth buying three packs as the difference between one gauge of strings either way isn't drastic it's unlikely you will find them unplayable.
SMILE!
Last edited by Mr.DeadDuck at Apr 10, 2012,
#4
A friend of mine did exactly what you are talking about with his Jackson, It wouldn't stay in tune for shit, how many trem springs have you got on at the moment?
#5
Sorry I meant to say loose the springs, yep string it up with the new strings then adjust is the way I do it.
SMILE!
#6
Quote by little_wingjimi
A friend of mine did exactly what you are talking about with his Jackson, It wouldn't stay in tune for shit, how many trem springs have you got on at the moment?


Three if my memory serves me right.

What Jackson does he have?

A JS?
#7
Cant remember exactly which model, I had to put another spring in though, which made it 4 in total.
#8
Youre probably not going to need another spring from 9s to 10s...you may need to tighten it, but even ... probably not.

Anytime you change string gauge you need to reset the intonation, and possibly your action.
#9
Quote by chronowarp
Youre probably not going to need another spring from 9s to 10s...you may need to tighten it, but even ... probably not.

Anytime you change string gauge you need to reset the intonation, and possibly your action.


How difficult is the intonation?
#10
Quote by jkielq91
How difficult is the intonation?


Quite easy. Heres from the EG setup sticky:

SETTING INTONATION: from icepoint...
Fine tuning String Length Makes Sure that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar.
One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and then play the fretted 12th fret note.

If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
Repeat the procedure on all strings.


just to add, if you can't get the harmonic to match the fretted 12th, compare the
open string note and the fretted 12th note.
be sure to tune the open string after each intonation screw adjustment.


ANOTHER WAY TO Explain Intonation:
-Play the harmonic at the 12th fret, listen closely to the resultant pitch
-Now play the same note by fretting the note at the 12th fret. The two notes should match exactly if the intonation is correct.
-If the fretted note sounds sharp, then adjust the bridge saddle so that it moves back away from the fingerboard.
-If the fretted note sounds flat, then adjust the bridge saddle so that it moves towards the fretboard.

- again, tune up the open string note after every screw adjustment.


Of course release the string tension on that string before moving saddles. Dunno if its mentioned^
#11
Quote by StonedColdCrazy
Quite easy. Heres from the EG setup sticky:

SETTING INTONATION: from icepoint...
Fine tuning String Length Makes Sure that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar.
One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and then play the fretted 12th fret note.

If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
Repeat the procedure on all strings.


just to add, if you can't get the harmonic to match the fretted 12th, compare the
open string note and the fretted 12th note.
be sure to tune the open string after each intonation screw adjustment.


ANOTHER WAY TO Explain Intonation:
-Play the harmonic at the 12th fret, listen closely to the resultant pitch
-Now play the same note by fretting the note at the 12th fret. The two notes should match exactly if the intonation is correct.
-If the fretted note sounds sharp, then adjust the bridge saddle so that it moves back away from the fingerboard.
-If the fretted note sounds flat, then adjust the bridge saddle so that it moves towards the fretboard.

- again, tune up the open string note after every screw adjustment.


Of course release the string tension on that string before moving saddles. Dunno if its mentioned^


Thanks. Well written.

It sounds like it could take ages on a first attempt though.


How likely is it to need doing if only going from 9 to 10?

And will the truss rodd need touching.
Last edited by jkielq91 at Apr 10, 2012,
#12
Quite likely to need intonating.
After all is said and done check the EG setup thread sticky. Theres a good bit on how to tell if your truss rod needs adjusting. Also Jenny (jj) runs the thread and will answer almost anything you gotta know beside floyd rose specific issues. Theres another sticky for that.