#2
You figure out what you have on it now and if you think they're too heavy go lower, if you think they're not heavy enough go higher.
SMILE!
Last edited by Mr.DeadDuck at Apr 10, 2012,
#3
Yeah it's pretty much all preference. If you're using lower tunings though then go for thicker strings as a general rule.

I'd say the standard string gauge for E standard is .10s.
#4
Yup .10s are standard, if you're just starting out you might want to try .9s because they'll be easier on your fingers. You should probably go for .11s if you're going to do any drop tuning.


I use Ernie Ball Skinny Top Heavy Bottom strings. Its a .52 gauge low E for big chunky chords, and a .10 gauge high e for nice easy bends and such
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#5
Yeah, for E standard 10-46 is the normal.

Its just something to experiment with, try some 9s, try 11s, its all opinion. Some people love light strings and will go to 8s, others go to 12s and beyond.
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#6
Generally speaking, some guitars will come stock with 9's (usually 25.5" scale length models) and some will come with 10's. They're both pretty standard gauges.

Lighter strings will be a little slacker. They'll be easier to bend. Heavier strings will be tighter, harder to bend and will generally sound a bit 'thicker' or 'meatier'. Decide whether to try a thicker or thinner gauge based on how you like the ones you have now.

There's a lot of people, particularly on here, who look down on people who use lighter strings, like string gauge is some sort of manliness test. Ignore those people and use strings that you like.

Billy Gibbons loves really light strings. SRV used really heavy strings. It all comes down to what you prefer to feel under your fingers.

As a general rule, if the scale length is shorter you'll want heavier strings to get the same tension. Similarly, if you're tuning down, you'll want heavier strings to get the same tension. For that reason, somebody who uses 10's in E standard might use 11's in D standard and so on.
#7
Quote by Confuse-a-Cat


There's a lot of people, particularly on here, who look down on people who use lighter strings, like string gauge is some sort of manliness test. Ignore those people and use strings that you like.



+.007-.038
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#8
Consider which gauge of string comes standard on your guitar.
On a superstrat, you'll often get .009 - .042 gauge strings.
On most other guitars, though, the standard gauge is .010 - .046.

From your standard gauge, consider what you want out of your strings.
If you want them to bend easily and feel light to play, get a lighter gauge of string.
If, however, you want them to feel a bit more chunky and rigid, get a heavier gauge.

In terms of tone, thinner strings will often sound jangly and bright. Conversely, thick strings will sound warm and "fat". However, I find this tonal difference to be negligible when compared to other influences (pickups, amp).
Ceci n'est pas une signature.
Last edited by PsiGuy60 at Apr 10, 2012,
#9
1,Go to the store
2,Gain the attention of the counter person.(how you do that is your business)
3,Tell said person you need strings.
4,Look over selection behind counter
5,Point and say I want a pack of those and a pack of these in different gauges.
5,Go home and try out different sets of strings until you find a set that feels comfortable to you.(hint...if your fingers bleed they are too thick)
6, Rinse and repeat.
Bhaok

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