#1
All
I have a decent basic working knowlege of music theory and I am currently learning modes. I would be grateful if someone could give me an outline of how I should continue with my journey into music theory. Kind of like a game plan is what I am looking for.

Here is a specific example of what I am looking for.

-Learn modes
-Record chord progressions in every key, practicing modes over each chord
-Learn popular songs and what mode their main riff is in
etc. eetc. etc. etc.


Can anyone help?

Woem
#2
Quote by woem
All
I have a decent basic working knowlege of music theory and I am currently learning modes.

Here is a specific example of what I am looking for.

-Learn modes
-Record chord progressions in every key, practicing modes over each chord
-Learn popular songs and what mode their main riff is in
etc. eetc. etc. etc.


Sure thing dude, I'm sure you know that most songs are in keys rather than modes anyway so I'll just adjust your items a little.

- Learn major and minor scales, harmonising them, chord creation, keys and accidentals
(At this point you'll have covered every possible combination of notes)
- Write chord progressions, or just jam over backing tracks using the above
- Learn popular songs....none are in modes so just focus on the above

And really, really, if you cover those above properly it will take a very long time to grasp. And once you do, you can play over literally any chord progression given to you.

Basically what I'm saying is that the most common usage of "modes" (on the internet anyway) is simply a prescribed pattern of accidentals to the major and minor scales. There are traditional modal songs sure, but these have pretty much been non-existant for the last 200 years or so.

So if you want to call a certain scale a "mode", sure why not. Certain scales are called "pentatonic" or "blues" too, but they have no impact on the harmonic context of the song either.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#3
learn cadences, Neapolitan chords, use of dominant 5ths to change keys, then other ways to change keys, understand whole tone and diminished scales, understand complex time, learn how to use more complex chords, chord substitution and how to borrow notes/ chords from different keys, and I can't stress this one enough LOOK AT FORM AND ARRANGEMENT, and if you get bored there's always counterpoint
#4
Quote by woem
Learn modes

Yeah, do that. Everything else you can just flush down the toilet.

Listen to Joe Satriani music.
#5
Quote by woem
All
I have a decent basic working knowlege of music theory and I am currently learning modes. I would be grateful if someone could give me an outline of how I should continue with my journey into music theory. Kind of like a game plan is what I am looking for.

Here is a specific example of what I am looking for.

-Learn modes
-Record chord progressions in every key, practicing modes over each chord
-Learn popular songs and what mode their main riff is in
etc. eetc. etc. etc.


Can anyone help?

Woem


Please advise what you think modes are, and how to write a modal progression, that is truly modal, as far as you understand it. If you can do that correctly, then you're fine. This answer will reveal that you know what you're talking about. Hint: 99% of the time people get this wrong.

It's OK, you will too...

Best,

Sean
#6
You're getting a little flack for prioritizing modes, which is a pretty common thing. The problem is that modes are a relatively small part of contemporary music theory - but for some reason guitarists love them and spend a lot of time working on them.

You say you have a pretty solid handle on music theory, but that's always a little bit tricky - because there's a lot to know and a lot of people think they "know theory" if they know how to harmonize the major scale.

So let me ask you this: what are the most complex theoretical concepts that you are able to apply to music you are creating? (I'm trying to get a handle on what you actually know).
#7
Quote by HotspurJr
You're getting a little flack for prioritizing modes, which is a pretty common thing. The problem is that modes are a relatively small part of contemporary music theory - but for some reason guitarists love them and spend a lot of time working on them.


Haha, it's probably our own fault that everyone wants to learn modes before everything else.
Just look at our own Music Theory FAQ sticky...

The whole 'Scales' section is basicially all about modes and they're the second thing anyone who tries to follow this guide even learns and it pretty much promotes this very kind of thinking that we are so annoyed of these days. You know... the mindset that a scale automaticly creates the feeling of a song. "I tried to use the Dorian scale in my solo, why doesn't it sound 'Jazzy, Soulful and Sophisticated'?!?! "
I don't even want to know how many times Xiaoxi had to give his little talk on this..

It's kinda OffTopic here, but I really think we NEED to make a new sticky.
It would make this forum so much more enjoyable and people might actually learn theory because they won't get scared away by words like 'Mixolydian' on the first page.