#1
Ive been playing for some years. I used to play punk rock, then I played some blues until now.

Is there any special excercises to become a lead guitarist?

My goal is to become a good lead guitarist , that not abuses speed or techniques. MY favorite guitarists are David Gilmour, Jimmy Page and George Harrison.

Sometimes I practice my bending and also my scales (I know pentatonic, minor harmonic, diatonic and modes) But I suck. Im not a guy who likes to practice a lot to be honest

Any advice?
Last edited by WhenStarsDie at Apr 11, 2012,
#2
'Sometimes' practising won't get you there.
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#3
There are several ways to become a good lead guitarist.

1) (and my favorite) Start to practice. Find really difficult song you love and practice it until you can play it woken up in the middle of the night without a single mistake. Just get yourself into the practice. Enjoy the practicing.

2) Get yourself some other instrument (with string of course) that has really hard strings. You can use some folk instrument, if you country has one, a banjo or something... Play it until you feel that your hand bones are going to brake. Then just eat some proteins and drink energy drinks. Then continue with playing. Play anything. Improvise melodies, anything, just play.

3) Just listen to whatever ppl on the internet say about playing. It might take a while to start playing GOOD this way (maybe 10 years or so) but it's a non-practice road to mastering the art of guitar.

Your choice. (hope you can recognize sarcasm in last part)
#4
You pretty much have to get interested in practice to improve.

Read the guide to all techniques thread here in this forum

Practicing once in a while does not help. You have to be consistent to be able to improve. e.g. 30 minutes a day is much better than 3 hours twice a week

Oh and it is definitely a major advantage you know the scales already. Now you have to learn that the metronome is your new best friend.
Last edited by Jyrgen at Apr 11, 2012,
#5
Learn movable triads all along the fretboard, but always think what notes you're playing.. Then learn arpeggios and scales and practice them in different ways.. Not up and down too much, people tend to get stuck into that. And again.. Know what notes you're playing. You'll get much more familiar with the fretboard, and notice much more confidence in your playing (at least I did/do)

I don't actually like the idea of using a metronome too much.. Of course you have to learn to keep time and check it often, but people focus on it way too much on guitar in my opinion. Which is understandable because guitar is mostly played with a band, but still.. I feel that it most people get too obsessed by it, when their technique needs something completely different.

I used to use a metronome a lot, but now I just learn scales in different melodic patterns, arpeggios, new chords and of course songs, and I get most of my technique from there. Most importantly for me, it doesn't feel mechanical. I feel like I'm actually learning something new. And I learn everything at a comfortable speed and every now and then I notice some speed improvement too. More so than when I actually aimed for speed.
#6
If you don't like to practice, don't expect to improve at all. Suck it up and play some exercises. Or better yet, learn some songs and do some improvising.
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#7
If you like David Gilmour then I would suggest you stick on Shine on you Crazy Diamond or something like that and play along with it, a few notes at a time until you can play it. Keep playing it over and over and you will start to understand the connection between the single notes and the key / chords of the song.
It is based around blues which is always a great way of learning to play lead guitar. Get some free blues backing tracks online and play along. Improvise and have fun.
#8
Quote by Unrelaxed

I don't actually like the idea of using a metronome too much.. Of course you have to learn to keep time and check it often, but people focus on it way too much on guitar in my opinion. Which is understandable because guitar is mostly played with a band, but still.. I feel that it most people get too obsessed by it, when their technique needs something completely different.


I totally agree with this. Actually, I prefer jamming along to a backing track or playing with a full band to practicing with a metronome. Not to say that using a metronome is bad, but I feel that playing along to an actual piece of music will in turn make your playing more "musical", if that makes sense.
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