#1
If I were to lose the tone pot that doesn't have the capacitor, do I literally just remove that pot and the wires that connect to it? (I've the 3 pickups, but for reasons that don't matter too much right now, I want to have just 1 tone, 1 volume knob!)

Newbie here, but hoping to get more into the under-the-hood stuff with my guitars.. thanks!

Last edited by lolamala at Apr 11, 2012,
#2
just go on some of the larger pickup manufacturer's websites (ie seymour duncan) pretty sure the schematic is there
#4
There should be a ground wire that runs from the Trem claw that you would solder to the back of the volume pot where all the other grounds run to.
YA GOTTA HIT IT ON THE ONE
pics of gear updated on profile 11/16/09
#5
Quote by GOLDIE93
There should be a ground wire that runs from the Trem claw that you would solder to the back of the volume pot where all the other grounds run to.


Mine has a ground wire (the black hanging loose one) from a tone pot...? And the grey double wire that runs from the volume pot goes to the output jack, is that not correct?
#6
If I just remove one of the tone knobs and the wires they lead to, would that not work? I'd still have the wired-up volume and other tone pot?
#7
Quote by lolamala
If I just remove one of the tone knobs and the wires they lead to, would that not work? I'd still have the wired-up volume and other tone pot?


No, the tone pots are wired before the switch atm, if you want just one to affect all the pickups it has to be after the switch.
#8
Quote by &baconstrips
No, the tone pots are wired before the switch atm, if you want just one to affect all the pickups it has to be after the switch.


the PU selector switch you mean? So are you saying... I have to re-solder the order at the PU selector end?
#9
Quote by lolamala
the PU selector switch you mean? So are you saying... I have to re-solder the order at the PU selector end?


Well, there's only 1 switch...
Solder your tone circuit to the middle lug of the volume pot
#10
Quote by &baconstrips

Solder your tone circuit to the middle lug of the volume pot


I'll get my head round this if it kills me! This is why I'm not a brain surgeon. That and .. the 'incident'. Ok, so as it stands, the center lug of the volume pot is going to the guitar input jack..? I didn't do that, that's how I got this! You're saying that's not right? The red wire from the center lug of the tone pot goes to the switch. The red wire from the 1st lug of the volume pot goes to the middle of the switch. The 2 pots have a black wired soldered to the back of each pot (not the lugs). That's where I'm at now. I'm confused. New photo! :


#11
In the photo, it shows the center lug of the volume pot going to the jack, which is perfect. The red wire coming from the tone pot is on the switch, which is wrong. Connect that wire to either the middle or the other lug on the volume pot (not the ground lug).

Also, I don't know whats going with the black grounded wire attached to the switch, but I havn't worked with a 5 way, so I don't know about that.
#12
Quote by &baconstrips
In the photo, it shows the center lug of the volume pot going to the jack, which is perfect. The red wire coming from the tone pot is on the switch, which is wrong. Connect that wire to either the middle or the other lug on the volume pot (not the ground lug).

Also, I don't know whats going with the black grounded wire attached to the switch, but I havn't worked with a 5 way, so I don't know about that.


Ok, so just to be absolutely clear - I take the red wire that's currently running from the center of the tone pot to the start of the switch, and connect that red wire to the volume lug on the right (which currently has nothing soldered to it) ... right?
#13
Standard Strat switches are wired a little different. The Strat switch is designed to correctly split the pickups to the different tone pots as well and switching the actual signal. To me, the easiest thing to do it just jumper the last three lugs on the switch (right side of the last photo.) Basically you just bridge all three of the last lugs and run the wire to the tone pot. That should work just as well as rewiring the whole thing the traditional non-strat way. At least that's now it should work from my experience with most 5-way switches I've worked with (mainly CRL.) I have not used the switch you have though.
#14
Quote by poppameth
To me, the easiest thing to do it just jumper the last three lugs on the switch (right side of the last photo.) Basically you just bridge all three of the last lugs and run the wire to the tone pot. That should work just as well as rewiring the whole thing the traditional non-strat way. At least that's now it should work from my experience with most 5-way switches I've worked with (mainly CRL.) I have not used the switch you have though.



Argh, now I'm more confused! You mean wire up like the pic below? :
#15
Yep, that's what I'm thinking. With a CRL switch you have two rows of swtiches but I'm pretty sure that switch is wired the same way, but the lugs are all in one row instead of two. It looks like it was originally wired like a standard strat, with one tone for the mid, one for the neck and nothing for the bridge pup. Mine was custom wired a while back so the middle tone pot ran the neck and the other one ran the bridge/middle. I rewired it to have the neck and middle on the middle pot and the bridge by itself on the other pot. It was just a matter of moving which set of lugs was jumpered. Using only one pot and and jumpering all three lugs should cause that pot to operate on all three pups.
Last edited by poppameth at Apr 11, 2012,
#16
Quote by lolamala
Ok, so just to be absolutely clear - I take the red wire that's currently running from the center of the tone pot to the start of the switch, and connect that red wire to the volume lug on the right (which currently has nothing soldered to it) ... right?


The red wire between the tone pot and the switch should be between the tone pot and the volume pot's center lug or (in the picture) left lug.

Edit: or do what he^ said
#17
Quote by &baconstrips
The red wire between the tone pot and the switch should be between the tone pot and the volume pot's center lug or (in the picture) left lug.

Edit: or do what he^ said


But the volume pot's center lug already has a wire from there going to the input jack. Where would that one then go from instead?
Last edited by lolamala at Apr 12, 2012,
#18
Here this might help you understand the wiring. This is an Ibanez I did recently. Pay attention mostly to the wiring on the pots.



This is a passive electric circuit. The tone pot and cap and a filter that sends certain range of frequencies to ground while allowing the rest to move on through the circuit to the signal being transmitted to the amp.
#20
Quote by &baconstrips
you can solder as many things to a lug as you can fit in there


So you mean I can solder the wire (the red wire that's currently running from the center of the tone pot to the start of the switch) to the center lug of the volume pot (that already has a wire running out to the input jack) .. ?
#21
You can do that or to the left lug like in my diagram. Either was should bleed to correct frequencies off. My way does it before the volume knob does it's thing. Putting it on the center lug does it after the volume knob does it's thing.
#22
Quote by lolamala
Mine has a ground wire (the black hanging loose one) from a tone pot...? And the grey double wire that runs from the volume pot goes to the output jack, is that not correct?


Yes, the loose end of the black wire needs to be soldered to the tremolo spring claw. Usually all the grounds terminate at the volume pot, but it is fine terminating at the tone pot.

The grey double wire goes to the output jack. The bare wire part goes to the ground terminal on the jack and the coated one goes to the positive terminal.

Also, congratulations for calling it the output jack. Some people on here get real upset if you call it the input jack.
YA GOTTA HIT IT ON THE ONE
pics of gear updated on profile 11/16/09
#23
I don't really care what you call it so long as I get what you are talking about, but yes output jack is the correct term. Your signal flows out from the guitar not into it.