#1
Hey guys, I've been playing guitar for a year now and right now I've been learning lead guitar and soloing. I know the major scales in all 5 positions, as well as the pentatonics. I can solo reasonably fast, but I feel like I am playing the same thing over and over. Any help to get out of this and play some interesting and melodic things?
#2
You could always try expanding upon your theory knowledge by learning more interesting scales and the modes. Try taking up a new style of music, I recently did this after years of playing hard rock and metal, and I've been learning classical and listening to a lot of folk. Not that I don't still digest a ton of metal, but expanding your horizons will help keep you entertained. Learn to analyze the absolute heck out of complex songs using theory, it can get really interesting. Play with others if you don't, try writing original music. Just some ideas, hope they help

EDIT: The reason I say this is that if you do this, you will learn interesting tricks from other people, genres, and scales. It really spices up your style, I can already tell how much more interesting my leads are since I started playing classical.
Last edited by Thermon at Apr 11, 2012,
#3
Thanks! But, there have been so many great guitarists that have been able to make interesting pieces with the pentatonic scale, and I just want to master this scale before I move on to others. I will keep your advice in mind though!
#4
Quote by sydrock
Thanks! But, there have been so many great guitarists that have been able to make interesting pieces with the pentatonic scale, and I just want to master this scale before I move on to others. I will keep your advice in mind though!


Go for it! Countless of my favorites have absolutely killed (in a good way) the pentatonic scale... Hendrix, Tony Iommi, Jimmy Page... all amazing guitarists. Other interesting scales can really spice up your playing, but the pentatonic scale is always an excellent base to work off of. It's the best thing to fall back on if you get lost or stuck in a jam. Have fun with it There are lots of licks you can learn out of it that sound really sweet, learning a lot of solos that have lots pentatonic licks is an excellent way to expand upon that (I pretty much learned the basis of playing guitar solos and tons of licks that are pentatonic from learning Metallica songs when I started out). You'll do great I'm sure
#6
I can think of three things that really helped me get better at soloing. Firstly, like Thermon said, expand your musical horizons. This doesn't have to involve learning new scales, but just listening to how the scales you know are used differently in different genres can really give you new ideas about how to use them in the genre you wanna play. Secondly, when you practice soloing, limit yourself to only using a few notes. Try soloing using only four notes but using a lot of bends, slides, etc. and you should find yourself coming up with lots of melodic ways to play those same few notes. Thirdly, if you cant improv the kind of solos that you can hear in your head, then write them just as you would any other part of a song. Write a solo one bar at a time if you have to, and then practice playing it. It will be much easier to improv a solo when you already have a general idea of where you want the solo to go and the more you write, the easier and faster it will be to write them. Anyway, those are just some of the things that helped me, I hope they help you too.
#8
Quote by sydrock
Hey guys, I've been playing guitar for a year now and right now I've been learning lead guitar and soloing. I know the major scales in all 5 positions, as well as the pentatonics. I can solo reasonably fast, but I feel like I am playing the same thing over and over. Any help to get out of this and play some interesting and melodic things?



What it sounds like, if I am reading you correctly, is that you can play in keys, but that you have no idea about the impact of the notes that you are choosing to use. This is sort of knowing lots of words, but unable to string them together to form thoughts, ideas and sentences.

What I suggest is a better understanding of music in general, to where you can actually understand, say a chord progression, target a note in your playing to coincide with that chord progression, and intentionally build a line to that chord, so that, on the change, you arrive at it, and know it's "value". That is, you have a reasonable idea what should happen, in terms of tension and/release.

So, a decision to learn music theory, and be able to apply it to the guitar might be a good thing for you.

Best,

Sean
#9
Quote by Sean0913
What it sounds like, if I am reading you correctly, is that you can play in keys, but that you have no idea about the impact of the notes that you are choosing to use. This is sort of knowing lots of words, but unable to string them together to form thoughts, ideas and sentences.

What I suggest is a better understanding of music in general, to where you can actually understand, say a chord progression, target a note in your playing to coincide with that chord progression, and intentionally build a line to that chord, so that, on the change, you arrive at it, and know it's "value". That is, you have a reasonable idea what should happen, in terms of tension and/release.

So, a decision to learn music theory, and be able to apply it to the guitar might be a good thing for you.

Best,

Sean


+1,

You know the shapes, but knowing what notes you are playing and how they will sound in context will increase your creative use of the pentatonic (well any scale really)