#1
Hey im going to record a fiew acoustic songs with my boss micro br and i need a preamp to use my akg C1000s.
so i wanted to buy the golden age pre 73...but now i heard of the helicon voicelive touche which has a nice preamp too; i could use the effects in my metal band as well.
so which one would you take? Priority has the recording...
my gear:

guitar: Schecter c1 classic
amp: Engl fireball
box: Engl v30 4x12
effects: g-major
in future: ESP eclipse, PRS Custom 24...
#2
What do you mean when you say "acoustic songs"? That's a very broad category.

Any warm tube amp should serve you for a classic acoustic ballad (60's Folk is what I'm thinking). Nice full, round sound for you. Easy mix. What's to mix? (Voice + guitar)

However if you are doing something more involved involving a bass, and perhaps piano, etc., then your choice has more to do with your overall production decision. There's nothing wrong with warmth, but it can turn to mud on a dense mix. For that you would want an extended high-end for clarity - presence.

Plenty of good pre's will give you that.

I think mic technique and the room you're in (and frankly your playing!) are more important than your choice of mic pre, though.

As I said about Folk, seriously if you had Simon and Garfunkel does it really matter what you use? You could probably use just about anything because in the right room that is just gonna sound great.

#3
thanks for your reply

well i want to record stuff im playing on my acoustic guitar - and my vocals too;
i need a mic preamp, and i want a good one...otherwise i may buy another one in 3 years and i want to avoid that

i know that the golden age is one of the best for its price, but i like the style of the touch...
my gear:

guitar: Schecter c1 classic
amp: Engl fireball
box: Engl v30 4x12
effects: g-major
in future: ESP eclipse, PRS Custom 24...
#4
You'd be far better off upgrading to an actual interface, then getting a pre at this point.

You're using a very cheap multitracker, thats purpose is to capture quick audio recordings for laying down ideas. It has more features than that, but its basically a glorified digital voice recorder. If you were to spend that money on the GAP preamp, you're still going to be using a unit that has horrible conversion, and very few options as far as ins and outs.

Upgrading to a decent interface, which will probably be about as much as the preamps you're looking at, will give you a much cleaner sound in the conversion, more options for monitoring, and preamps that you probably won't feel the need to upgrade from for quite some time.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#5
Quote by MatrixClaw
You'd be far better off upgrading to an actual interface, then getting a pre at this point.

2nd that point!

Not sure what to tell you as far as interfaces on the market now, but I've been happy with the Midiman Delta series. I purchased that in 2001 and it's still serving me well.

I'd avoid Presonus or Behringer (good GOD avoid that brand! Lol) - a lot of problems with those.

You have two routes you can go at this point. I usually go to Guitar Center and just let them try and sell me on stuff. I'm like, "What's in the $1000 price range?" and just see what they tell me.

What's the good stuff, you know?

After spending 30 minutes of my life in that miserable 7th circle of Hell I know what to go home and look for used on eBay.



I'm cheap that way, though. Risky business, too, as you can end up paying and not receiving, or buying something broken and so forth. I've gotten some good deals, though...

The Midiman I was talking about? $500-$600 card in it's day. Good card!

$72 -

It's got two relatively decent pre's on it as well, so it's good enough for my purposes. I also picked up a cheap tube pre that I use for my wife's vocals. I forget the brand name on it. That was about $80 new at GC (7th Circle of Hell again!!)

I use that tube pre to warm up a voice or I drive it harder with a bass to get a little growl out of my low end.

Most of this game is learning how to work with the tools you have available. My tools are not high end by any means, but I know what their strengths and weaknesses are and how to utilize them for my evil purposes.



For an acoustic guitar and a voice? The mic placement/selection is key! You want to record in stereo probably, so that pair (it's a pair, right?) of AKG's is great at a distance of, oh, three feet (a meter...ish) or so. A trick I've used is to place a pair of condensers between a rolled-up bunch of bubble wrap packing material (roughly head-sized.)

Having that head-sized dead zone in between your mics has AMAZING effects on the realism. You will SWEAR to whatever deity you believe in that there is someone in the room.

I've scared that crap out of myself with my own recordings because I, like, cough on tape and I jumped about ten feet thinking there was someone in my house.



A lot of cheap tricks.

Or space your mics WAY far apart. You can get a really otherworldly expanded stereo field that is kind of nice. That's used all the time on drums or with, like a string quartet. It can really make you and your instrument sound larger than life (literally ten feet wide.)

Additionally, though, you will need two focus mics, so four total. One for your guitar and one for your voice. Both condensers, although dynamics could work. If you're strumming that thing, then a good old SM57 should do fine, but if you're a finger-picker or want to pick up string noises or delicate details then that will not work, obviously.

I've always been a sucker for those little squeaky string sounds. As a kid that's how I decided who was good and who sucked at guitar, lol. A small diaphragm condenser pointed at the 20th fret or so, maybe 8-12 inches back will be a good spot (especially since warmth will come from your distant mics and you don't want cancellation in that range.)

For your voice an LDC would be ideal, but again if you're like an Eddie Vedder or Kurt Cobain type of a singer (pretty loud) then whatever... a 57 will do it.

Do you want the listener to hear every lip-smacking detail? Every swallow? Or do you want to obscure it, and compress it later?

Option A? Condenser. B? Dynamic.
#6
thanks for the responses so far!

problem ist this:
i dont know much about the mic, interface, or preamp stuff, nor about reworking on pc.
but i own the boss micro br and a get along with it pretty good.
i created nice songs with it but was always disapointed with the mic-quality.
so i thougt that i should buy a mic preamp and a mic.
do you think that its nonsense to buy a C1000 and a Pre 73 to play along with the boss micro br?
is the converter of the br too bad?
i hope you can help me out cause i really want to get more out of my micro br
my gear:

guitar: Schecter c1 classic
amp: Engl fireball
box: Engl v30 4x12
effects: g-major
in future: ESP eclipse, PRS Custom 24...
#7
Quote by dickeskind
do you think that its nonsense to buy a C1000 and a Pre 73 to play along with the boss micro br?
is the converter of the br too bad?
i hope you can help me out cause i really want to get more out of my micro br

Absolutely.

It baffles me why you'd want to spend ~$600 on trying to get a better sound out of a cheap recorder, when you could probably spend half that on a new interface and mic and likely come out with a similar quality. I've never heard an actual shootout of your Boss unit, but most multitrackers have fairly poor conversion and preamps, and this is at the higher end of the spectrum. With a $200 one, I'd expect the conversion to be pretty useless for anything other than quick demos.

If you were going to spend money on a condenser mic, you should've went with an LDC, instead if a SDC. Both are commonly used on acoustic, but if I had to choose one or the other, I'd definitely go with a Large Diaphragm mic, because of the better bass response and generally fuller sound. Most SDCs are more on the brighter side, because their purpose in most studios are as drum overheads, to capture cymbals, or around the 12th fret of an acoustic, to capture the brighter side of the spectrum. An LDC is also much more versatile, as they are widely used as vocal mics, as well as room mics for electric guitar and drums.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com