#1
I know, I know - There are a lot of threads about monitors already....

I'm looking for a pair of monitors for a home studio. I'm looking at spending around AUD700.
For reference, that will get a pair of behringer B2031's at aus pricing.

So I'm unsure as of yet whether to purchase from aus or import. I think I can get the B3031's for just over 500 shipped from thomann [assuming there are no restrictions on importing those.]

Anyway; I went to a music store today and here's my thoughts on what I tried:

KRK Rokit 5:
Low end seemed a little hyped and I didn't like the highs as much as the mackie or yamaha's I tried.

KRK Rokit 6:
I was surprised at how similar they were to the Rokit 5's. I wouldn't pay for the increase in price just for an extra inch; especially as the high end on the 5's seemed ever slightly more clearer to me.

Yamaha HS50:
I found the lack of bass disturbing. Best high end out of all of them though.

Mackie MR5:
Liked these probably the most of what I tried. Seemed to be in between the rokit and yamahas - in terms of bass and how I liked the high end.

Behringer Truths:
Didn't get to try these but are one of the main contenders of what I'm looking at.

So those are my initial thoughts from ~20 minutes of listening at a music store. Are their any other monitors I should be looking at? What are others opinions on these monitors?

I'm thinking [from looking at specs/reviews rather than trying them out] that the behringer b3030A might be what I'm leaning towards. But without trying them I can's say for sure.

I have a fairly big room, so I'm wondering if I should look for something bigger than 5" is the other thing.
RIP Gooze

cats
Last edited by mulefish at Apr 12, 2012,
#2
I'd like to steer you away from Behringer. Quality and performance are often spotty at best.

I'd like to suggest you also have a look at the JBL Control series. I own a pair of JBL Control 5 studio monitors, which I have wall mounted. They are available for around $325 USD and the wall mount for the pair is another $99 USD. These are professional grade speakers, as opposed to consumer grade, which is what you'll get from Behringer, KRK and others. They are designed for broadcast, sound engineering and other pro applications. You'll find them on JBL's professional site. They are passive, so you'll need an amplifier to drive them. So, if you don't already have one, that would probably put them out of your budget. If budget is available for an amp, I'd recommend the Crown D-75A. These amps used to sell for around $1200 USD, but are being phased out at around $300. They are also pro quality. Pics of both in My Gear of my profile.

Edit: The photo of my Control 5 monitors shows them on a shelf, but they are currently mounted to the wall in my small home studio. This really works much better, since I can direct them right at my ears for best sound. As I recall, they'll handle 175 watts, so you can really get them going. They sound very nice at low or high volume levels. If you want to see a photo of them mounted to the wall, I'll post one.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Apr 12, 2012,
#3
Yamaha HS50M and then balancing low-end on a pair of good headphones is what I did for a few years before upgrading to a pair of Adam A7X's (I still balance the very low end on headphones, though)
#4
From what I remember, the HS-50's are marketed as a modern NS-10 by Yamaha? I don't think they sound at all alike (if I remember the model number correct!) but if the low end is restricted then I guess maybe they did try harder than I thought. NS-10's have very little low-end as they're not ported (a good thing, for time domain response, particularly in the important midrange) whereas the HS' are ported, so presumably have a lower freq. response and are also not as balanced (ports are tuned to frequencies by the manufacturer to encourage low end resonation in the air, giving the impression of a bigger driver producing more bass, but this does then mean that there are frequencies [fundamental, plus the harmonics at gradually-diminishing amounts] that ring out stronger in the lower end).

I like my KRK RP6's mainly because once you adjust to the hyped low end (glad someone agrees with me on that!) they are easy to mix on and will last you until your budget is much bigger (and then I would say the best speakers I've heard were the KRK Exposé 8's but they are very expensive, and hard to find, not to mention I haven't listened to so many high-end speakers aside from the more common players - Adam, Barefoot etc.).

In a way though, I'd say you should just find a speaker that all your reference mixes sound good on (if you haven't made a reference CD to test at the store, do so before making a purchase as this will reveal what the speaker is doing) and that isn't hiding anything you've heard in the mix before - better still if it reveals new things to your ears that you hadn't spotted before - and then learn that speaker (and your room) with as much listening practise as you can do without going insane. Then it matters little about frequency response, as long as you learn how to compensate (and let's face it - no speaker is perfect).
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#5
The NS10 and HS50m are somewhat similar in frequency response (and looks!), but as you mentioned, have their differences. If you enable the +mid-switch on the HS50m, it even further resembles the mid-hump in the curve of the NS10, making it a very unforgiving monitor. If you look away from the lack of bass, they are still very good reference monitors in the sense that if you can make it sound good on the HS50m's, it will probably sound good on most speaker systems.
#7
How would you go about fixing the low end hype from KRK's? It's the main thing that's stops me buying a pair.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#9
Equator D5, blows all those out of the water and are only 300$. I upped from Rokits to those, first listen I put my Rokits on clist. Those things are pieces of shit.
#10
Quote by KG6_Steven
I'd like to steer you away from Behringer. Quality and performance are often spotty at best.

Whilst I'm always wary of behringer products - every now and then they release something that is amazing for the price. I've heard mixed reviews; but it seems that a lot of people hate these monitors because of the behringer logo rather than from listening to them.

I'd like to suggest you also have a look at the JBL Control series. I own a pair of JBL Control 5 studio monitors, which I have wall mounted.

thanks, passive monitors aren't something I've looked into much. Would I be right in saying active is probably better in the cheaper price range?

Quote by DisarmGoliath
In a way though, I'd say you should just find a speaker that all your reference mixes sound good on (if you haven't made a reference CD to test at the store, do so before making a purchase as this will reveal what the speaker is doing) and that isn't hiding anything you've heard in the mix before - better still if it reveals new things to your ears that you hadn't spotted before - and then learn that speaker (and your room) with as much listening practise as you can do without going insane. Then it matters little about frequency response, as long as you learn how to compensate (and let's face it - no speaker is perfect).

Thanks for the advice

Quote by Odirunn
I've heard nothing but good things about Equator D5's and I'll probably be grabbing a pair in the near future to replace my KRK Rokit 5's. http://www.ultimatemetal.com/forum/equipment/758982-equator-d5-monitor-review.html

Unfortunately these are only 120V. Don't know why they don't make export models :/

So far I haven't really been impressed with anything as much as I'd hoped. I'm considering trying to stretch my budget to the Yamaha HS80ish range. I'm hoping they don't have the lack of bass that the 50's have.

Thanks for the replies by the way
RIP Gooze

cats
#11
A friend of mine has the HS80's and I thought they were fantastic. My personal point of reference is comparing them to my Yorkville YSM1's, which are about $700 for the pair and got great reviews when they were out. (they've since been replaced by other generations, which are somewhat different)

In fact, If I was buying monitors right now, the HS80's would probably be my first choice - at least until I could afford some A7X's from Adam Audio, which are the business in near-fields.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by mulefish
Whilst I'm always wary of behringer products - every now and then they release something that is amazing for the price. I've heard mixed reviews; but it seems that a lot of people hate these monitors because of the behringer logo rather than from listening to them.


thanks, passive monitors aren't something I've looked into much. Would I be right in saying active is probably better in the cheaper price range?


Thanks for the advice




Same here. And as much as I hate their stuff, I actually own one of their mics and processors. I think you hear mixed reviews, because the quality is spotty from one unit to the next and a lot of guys starting out will buy Behringer, because it's cheap. As our ears and budgets improve, we tend to replace the cheap Behringer stuff with better quality gear.

If you're on a budget, going with an active monitor is probably going to be your best solution. However, you have to remember that you get what you pay for. I'm certainly not trying to brag, but between my monitors, wall mounts and the amplifier, I probably have somewhere around $1600 wrapped up. The sound quality is simply incredible... and it should be. I've listened to cheaper monitors and didn't care for what I heard. The sound reproduction quality was pitiful at best and appalling at worst. On most, the bass quality is so poor, if you don't spend the extra to get the subwoofer, you'll soon regret not purchasing it.

Some of the blokes here have given you good advice. Read the reviews and check out your local stores. Use your ears. Remember... what sounds good at the store will likely sound completely different in your space.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Apr 13, 2012,
#13
Quote by axemanchris


In fact, If I was buying monitors right now, the HS80's would probably be my first choice - at least until I could afford some A7X's from Adam Audio, which are the business in near-fields.

CT


Glad to see someone else likes the A7's. I thought the low end on them was pretty pathetic from the beginning, but everything else was present so I went for them anyway. After I put bass traps and refection absorption in my room the lows are actually happening.

I wouldn't recommend adding a sub to your setup until you have bass traps in your room. Not that the NS-10 like monitors will magically have low end, but adding a sub to an untreated room will give you chaos in the low end.
#14
I liked the Adam A7's, though I thought they were a bit lacking in low end detail (had low end, it was just a bit 'vague'), but I'm not as keen on the A7X's from what I heard (though it was in a completely different room that I was unfamiliar with). Not sure what it was, but to me the A7's were better and the A7X might have fancier technology but I don't think it's a step forward tonally.

I've not heard of Equator D5's though - gonna google 'em now and see what the fuss is about
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#15
Re: Behringer.

The company gets a really bad rap on the internet due to a lot of unfounded rhetoric from people who have come to believe the rhetoric as passed on from others.

My own personal experience with them is that they allow a lot of us to get in and get started with usable gear that will sound okay and do what it is supposed to with reasonably reliability.

I've had Behringer products (MX802a mixer; UB2442 FX PRO mixer, Ultra-something compressor) and still have (X-Vamp, DI Box, ECM8000 mics, HA4700 headphone amp) and have only ever had one problem. That problem was resolved by my music store who sent the product back to Behringer for repair under warranty, which took about two weeks, during which time, the music store gave me an identical working loaner. My total down-time was about an hour, and it cost me nothing. I have had worse problems (but nothing major at all) with M-Audio and TC Electronic, though am still quite happy with both of those companies too.

Their build quality has always been fine, then, though I don't make a habit of beating the crap out of my gear. Maybe if I dropped my mixer off of the back of a truck or something, it might not hold up as well as a Soundcraft or something, but that's really kinda moot.

As far as customer service goes... deal with the point of purchase and let THEM deal with Behringer.

Quality - sure, you can do better. Yes, you WILL outgrow their products. The products I even still have, I almost never use, except for the headphone amp. But in order to do better, you have to spend at least twice as much. The Behringer monitors at $200 each will not stack up to the Mackie824's or the Adam A7's at more than 3x the price, but they're not expected to. In fact, like most behringer stuff, expect to pay between 50 and 100% more before you start to get really measurably better quality.

To use a car analogy...

A Hyundai is probably almost as good as a Honda or a Toyota, but there's probably not THAT much difference between them. However, once you start doubling the price and getting into a Lexus or Acura, you'll start noticing more quality.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Quote by llanafreak44
Equator D5, blows all those out of the water and are only 300$. I upped from Rokits to those, first listen I put my Rokits on clist. Those things are pieces of shit.

those equator monitors look interesting. ive been meaning to pick up monitors for a while now, and i think i may have to have a go with these. all the reviews sound excellent.
#17
I have the Behringer 3031a's and they're definitely worth the price. I was skeptical (like most people) just because they are Behringer, but after doing a lot of research they had very high ratings. The pair cost me $500 new (I think there's a few different versions that are cheaper).