#1
Hey guys, I think this is the right place for my question!
I'm looking to build a home studio for recording for my band, maybe more. My buddy already has an SM57 for use, and I'm looking for a mic that can handle vocals well and work on overhead drums.
What would work well for these roles? I found a Behringer B2 Pro on CL for 120, would it work alright?
I have to work with a two mic setup by the way, I'll be running through a USB interface into my laptop (no firewire available)

Thanks in advance for any help!
#3
Quote by FireHawk
If your looking to build a home studio and get decent results I wouldn't worry about recording drums until you can spare more money. Two mics just aren't going to do it.

I gotcha. I'm not looking to build high quality though. Not yet at least. The bandmates wanna get out a demo ASAP, which is why were looking to put something simple yet efficient together. Know what I mean?
#4
So if your purpose is to put out a demo ASAP....

Do you want to get an inadequate amount of gear, and use it with inadequate knowledge and insufficient experience to produce an inferior demo?

Or do you want to spend a moderate amount of money - say, $300 - and do two days at a project studio and record a proper demo with proper gear with someone who knows how to use it?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Alright.. Well then what would a good starting point be for a home studio?
None of us want to go to a studio, we want to do it ourselves.
#6
To set up your own home studio so you can do drums even half way decent, here is a post I made about a week ago.

You're not going to do drums very well for under a grand. And if you want a PA as well... you're going to have to make some choices.

Cheapest I would go, buying new would be:

Interface:
Presonus AudioBox 44VSL - $325

Monitors:
Behringer B1030A - $300/pr

Mics:
Behringer C2 - matched pair - good for overheads for drums = $70
Rode NT1 - LD condenser for vocals = $275
Shure SM57 - snare, guitar cabs = $100
Apex 325 kick drum mic = $130

Since you can't use any more than four cables at a time with that particular interface (so if you were doing drums, you'd do kick, snare, stereo overheads)

4 cables and stands @~$40 = $160

Software:
Reaper = $60

Total = $1520

Now, if you can find stuff used, you can probably get that under a grand.

Keep in mind that you will only be able to record four tracks at a time. You'll need to plan carefully how you'll capture just the drums and not the rest of the band if you want to avoid bleeding into the drum tracks.


Keep in mind that another factor in doing it yourself is the time it takes to learn to do so. Consider that it took you a few years before your guitar playing was ready for prime-time, and then consider the fact that, like guitar playing, learning to record is yet another skill that takes years of study and practice to get good at it. Even with high-end gear, your first recordings will be less than good, which is not surprising, because even with high end gear, a guitarist who is only starting out isn't going to sound that good either.

So, your options are:
-spend a grand on used gear and take a couple of years to learn to do it yourself.
-spend $300 on a project studio and have a decent sounding demo in a weekend.
-spend whatever on whatever gear, record something before you're ready and release a demo that will be only listenable.

I'm not trying to discourage you. It's just that, if you want to learn to record, then do so knowing that you will need to be prepared to invest both time and money - just like any other instrument. If you simply want an inexpensive demo, find someone like me in your town who has a few thousand dollars worth of gear in their basement and a number of years learning to use it who will charge you somewhere in the neighbourhood of $150 for a day's worth of recording.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
^^ Good advice.

It takes years to even learn what type of studio you might want to invest in. That takes spending some time in some different studios and seeing what you like.