#1
Ok, break it down for a newbie.

What is the argument against a Tremolo?

I read a lot of people saying they suck, and that buying the exact same guitar without a tremolo is a great buy, but with the tremolo, not so much.

So, what gives?

Can someone explain this to me?
#2
fixed bridge: more tuning stability, more sustain (generally), able to change tunings whenever you want, marginally better attack, less bridge in the way, easier to set up.

tremolo: ability to do big vibrato and make different sounds.
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#3
I am gonna assume you are talking about a Floyd Rose style bridge...
If you're gonna play in extremely low tunings, I can see why it would prove to be annoying. But other than that, I don't see any difficulties.

You just gotta get used to it. and plus... tremolos are fun to just mess around with.
#4
Trem are harder to setup, and makes detuning more complex. But on the other hand, you can do techniques you cqn do only with a trem.

Also, you can block q trem to make it hardtail, but you cant unblock q hardtil to make it trem.
#5
Basically: Tremollo is fun if you play with it, useless if you don't

A guitar with a proper settup shouldn't detune with or without a tremollo, floating or not.

If you want to change tuning "on the fly", you can't have a full floating tremollo.
#6
I'm going to assume TS is talking about a Floyd Rose-style tremolo.

If you want to do a lot of divebombs and mucking about with bending harmonics, a Floyd-style tremolo can be awesome. However if you're going to play in a lot of different tunings it does make for a pretty tedious set-up because you have to rebalance the trem every time you change tunings.
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#7
Quote by seabear70
What is the argument against a Tremolo?

For a Floyd type bridge:
- There's a learning curve when it comes to changing strings.

- The knife edges will eventually wear out if you constantly abuse the bridge.

- Resting your hand on the bridge will cause the strings to go sharp.

- Breaking or detuning a string will cause the others to go sharp.

- Spring claw adjustments if you change gauges or tuning.

Quote by PsiGuy60
However if you're going to play in a lot of different tunings it does make for a pretty tedious set-up because you have to rebalance the trem every time you change tunings.


This needs to be drilled into the head of every new guitarist playing with floating bridges before they freak out over ridiculously high action.