#1
Alright, so I'm debating on whether or not to sand the finish off the back and headstock of my guitar neck because it's really ****ed up. However there is no paint on the back so I'm not really sure when I'd know to stop or if I've sanded enough, and it seems like it'd be easy to ruin. Also how would I cover up the fretboard so I don't sand the side of it by accident or anything.

Are there any methods to doing this?
#2
Mask off the fretboard with masking tape. Sand the neck down untill there is no more sticky finish on it (should feel smooth, like a satin finish) and then either keep it bare or put a few coats of tung oil on it to seal the wood.
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

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#3
How bad is it? Is it pitted, scratched or just rough?

I sand my necks to make them feel smoother. It makes me think I can play faster.
I sand a natural finish neck starting with 1500 grit and up to 2500. Then wet. I'm not sure this works but that's my story and I'm sticking to it. I won't sand a painted neck.

If you're starting with 100 or 200 grit you could do some damage if you're not careful.

Oh heck you said you're sanding the finish off. OK, I'd start around 200 grit but go easy.

I never have trouble keeping away from the fret board. Just pay attention or lay some masking tape over the sides of the fret board while you sand.

Heck you might want to try some kind of finish remover, but if you spill it ...
Smile when you say that.
#4
Quote by stonyman65
Mask off the fretboard with masking tape. Sand the neck down untill there is no more sticky finish on it (should feel smooth, like a satin finish) and then either keep it bare or put a few coats of tung oil on it to seal the wood.


Alright, so I should be able to just feel the difference then?

Quote by BillyRamone
How bad is it? Is it pitted, scratched or just rough?

I sand my necks to make them feel smoother. It makes me think I can play faster.
I sand a natural finish neck starting with 1500 grit and up to 2500. Then wet. I'm not sure this works but that's my story and I'm sticking to it. I won't sand a painted neck.

If you're starting with 100 or 200 grit you could do some damage if you're not careful.

Oh heck you said you're sanding the finish off. OK, I'd start around 200 grit but go easy.

I never have trouble keeping away from the fret board. Just pay attention or lay some masking tape over the sides of the fret board while you sand.

Heck you might want to try some kind of finish remover, but if you spill it ...


Well I mostly the headstock is messed up, but I bought this guitar from a friend for really cheap so I'm not really going to regret it too much if it comes out terrible. There's a slight groove in the neck. I'm thinking of 250, and I'll get some masking tape. I'm avoiding chemicals for now. Thanks.
#5
Just sand the neck with 0000 gauge steel wool. This will make it feel like a satin finished neck and remove the stickyness.
#6
Quote by Darkdevil725
Just sand the neck with 0000 gauge steel wool. This will make it feel like a satin finished neck and remove the stickyness.


Well I was thinking of painting the neck like how gibson does, mainly because I don't really care much about this guitar, and fix the headstock at the same time.