#1
So hi guys. I got a challenge from my guitar teacher to learn 5 jazz solos note by note to the summer. I need to know it in and out, so i can recall them when i want. The solos shuld contain alot of 2-5-1 progressions, so i can use them in other tunes. I love fusion like guthrie govan, shawn lane, greg howe, but the solos dosnt need to be fusion style. So what solos shuld i learn?
#2
He probably wants you to NOT learn fusion solos.

Ornithology (Charlie Parker's solo)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEeISJ0wr48

Four on Six (Wes' solo)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRsMzCnQNpo

Fee Fi Fo Fum (I'd look at the first solo [trumpet])
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clGrqjuZI3M

Billie's Bounce (Charlie Parker's Solo)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4mRaEzwTYo&feature=related

Donna Lee (Parker's solo)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hANODMX9c5g

Blue Bossa (Pat Martino's Solo)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyB5YBA2l4M

Learning any bop head is going to give you tons of material over ii-V's.
Last edited by chronowarp at Apr 13, 2012,
#3
Quote by chronowarp
He probably wants you to NOT learn fusion solos.

Ornithology (Charlie Parker's solo)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEeISJ0wr48

Four on Six (Wes' solo)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRsMzCnQNpo

Fee Fi Fo Fum (I'd look at the first solo [trumpet])
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clGrqjuZI3M

Ok thanks for the reply! Until now we have only worked on standard tunes. Fusion is just halfway jazz i gues...
#4
Fusion is great, but if you're trying to learn Jazz you really need to investigate swing & bop before you move onto fusion. You need to build from the bottom and up, you know? It'd be like trying to learn to build a house by putting up siding.
#5
Quote by chronowarp
Fusion is great, but if you're trying to learn Jazz you really need to investigate swing & bop before you move onto fusion. You need to build from the bottom and up, you know? It'd be like trying to learn to build a house by putting up siding.

Well for some reason i have always found fusion alot easyer. Its often an easy progression and just normal scales...
#6
A lot of fusion is no doubt easier in terms of what's harmonically going on, and that's sort of why you should stay away from it if you really wanna ramp up your jazz playing and understanding of jazz.
#7
there arre no 5 essential solos. but what i would recommend is picking solos that strike you and are also somewhat significant in jazz. more so the soloist than the cut. so any bird solo will do if it strikes your fancy. doesn't matter which one cause it's bird that matters, not which tune.

what i'd do is:

- one swing-era/pre-bop solo (louis armstrong, roy eldrigde, johnny hodges, charlie christian, bix beiderbecke, coleman hawkins, lester young, etc)

- one pure bebop solo (charlie parker, dizzy gillespie, clifford brown, bud powell, fats novarro, etc.)

- one hard bop solo (kind of overlaps with bebop in some respects. prestige-era miles, john coltrane, sonny rollins, clifford brown, sonny stitt, donald byrd, cannonball adderley, lee morgan, horace silver)

- one cool west coast solo (chet baker, art pepper, lenny tristano, paul desmond, dave brubeck, gerry mulligan, stan getz, bill evans, etc)

and then just one of your choice. you could maybe do "post-bop", but to me that just sounds like west coast stuff. each one of those will:

1. teach you a lot about jazz and what makes styles distinguishable (hint: it's rhythm and feel).

2. teach you about what aspect of jazz really speaks to you.

me, i love all of it, but there's no denying that i love hard bop more than anything. it's THE sound of jazz to me. that said, i like a lot of cool school stuff. especially chet baker. his playing/scatting is so natural and without pretense. everything is completely melodic, logical and never do i get the feeling that he's bullshitting me. he'd also be a good place to start BECAUSE his ideas are often so clear and logical.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88CqlgFAJ-k

remember that jazz is an aural tradition. getting the notes are only half the battle. you have to try to really make it sound with the same inflection and accents and get down the feel of the licks and solo.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Apr 13, 2012,
#8
id say
miles davis on so what
miles davis on trane's blues
miles davis on oleo (the bag's groove recording)
bill evan's right hand on my foolish heart (1961 recording)
hank mobley on if i should lose you (use a slow downer for parts of it).
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#9
Primus fan:thanks alot, do you have any spesific recordings in mind?
theREALcaptain: i have played alittle on so what, but its a modal tune, and the solos is over a Dm vamp. I was searcing for stuff that uses common jazz progressions like 2-5-1 and 2-5, so i can very easy apply it.
#10
theREALcaptain: i have played alittle on so what, but its a modal tune, and the solos is over a Dm vamp. I was searcing for stuff that uses common jazz progressions like 2-5-1 and 2-5, so i can very easy apply it.

I know I'm not in the majority on this, but let me give you my rational.
the presumption is that you want to study other soloists so as to improve your improvising. pulling a lick out and playing it over a 2-5-1 won't help you do that, all it will do is teach you to mimic--the same way one would teach a bird to talk, it can produce the words, but it can't speak the language. therefore, I'd imagine the goal of transcription should be to wrap your head around jazz phrasing and timing and to help you train your ears, so you can come up with jazz sounding phrases better, and be better at playing what you are hearing (rather then give you musical information to regurgitate later). the reason I suggested that solo is because I figured since you made this thread you weren't super experienced in learning jazz solos by ear, and its a fairly easy one, and it is also one of the most melodic solos you could imagine, and it's rhythmic component is amazing. good solos don't come from playing licks, but from developing ideas logically and telling a musical story, and that in my opinion theres few solos that do it better then that one (though everyone else in this thread gave you good suggestions that feature melodic development).
also, if you really wanted to, you could find plenty of material in that solo that would work over a ii-V-I, just because something was originally written for one harmonic situation does not mean it only works in that one, for example, if you played the notes F-A-C-E-F-G-A- in order and constant eighth notes, it would give you a line that would work well on F major, D minor, G suspended, B half diminished, DbMaj7#5, Bb Maj7 and quite possibly a good deal of other chords. I'm sure if you had to find parrotable ii-V lines, you could find some in that solo (and also be a bit creative), but I also think you'd be missing the point. that being said, if you end up wanting to learn a more beboppy solo instead, to get inside that kind of phrasing and to melodically see where those guys are coming from, it will only help you, but theres a reason a TON of players (myself included) learn that solo as their first transcription.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Apr 13, 2012,
#11
I'm not in love with your teacher's approach to things, although I don't think there's anything wrong with trying to transcribe other people's solos. It certainly can be informative/useful. But if we're going to be all about jazz, I really think they should be giving you the tools to improvize - without having to refer to or mimick a particular solo that someone did. But whatevs. I'll let your teacher have his way. I'm certainly in no position to tell them what to do.
#12
I hate to be "that guy", but it's not gonna happen.

Know 5 Jazz solos in and out by the end of Summer? I'm not sure you know exactly what that means. I spent 3 months on one solo with my guitar teacher. It wasn't even the entire solo. It was the first 3 minutes of it and we didn't even cover everything that we could have.

You're in over your head, buddy.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Apr 14, 2012,
#13
+1 to Brain's and AugmentedFourth.

When your teacher asks you to learn the solos, does he mean learn them from sheet music/tab, or to transcribe them by ear yourself? The latter is far more beneficial. But either way, his "challenge" is unrealistic, pretty crazy, and at the very least, pretty ridiculous, actually.

As said above, he should be providing you with the tools to improvise. Moreover, encouraging you to transcribe the melodies and harmonies of various standards you should learn.
#14
Yea. I don't see why your teacher isn't basically, among other things, busting out the real book material and giving you lead sheets for standards (and then transitioning away from the lead sheet and into your memory), and giving you the tools in terms of both harmony and melody to be able to both play the changes and melodies and improvize with them.

Because that's generally what you're going to be doing in a jazz setting - not playing someone's solo from an album, but doing your own arrangements and group-improvized interpretations of tunes.

You'd actually be better off being given such tools, and in terms of familiarity with sounds produced by the greats, ultimately, your ability to produce those sounds is going to come from internalization of musical ideas - which comes with listening to the music and playing it more over time.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Apr 14, 2012,
#16
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I hate to be "that guy", but it's not gonna happen.

Know 5 Jazz solos in and out by the end of Summer? I'm not sure you know exactly what that means. I spent 3 months on one solo with my guitar teacher. It wasn't even the entire solo. It was the first 3 minutes of it and we didn't even cover everything that we could have.

You're in over your head, buddy.


it depends on the solo. i've transcribed some solos in one day. obviously you're not going to start out trying to learn giant steps. just try one or two chorus stuff. it's not any less musical, and is sometimes even more so.

#DTWD
#17
Quote by primusfan
it depends on the solo. i've transcribed some solos in one day. obviously you're not going to start out trying to learn giant steps. just try one or two chorus stuff. it's not any less musical, and is sometimes even more so.


oh no, learning them is easy. Learning them "In and Out" is hard. That's when you get to the stuff like "why did he choose this particular lick over this ii-V-I and why does it work?" or "how does he approach this odd chord and make it resolve so seamlessly everytime?"

That's what I was getting at.
#18
The essential Jazz solos:

1. Black Star - Yngwie Malmsteen
2. Hey Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley
3. Bizzare Love Triangle '94 - New Order
4. Violin Concerto no.1 - Syzmanowski
5. Rockin' Chair - Oscar Peterson
#19
Quote by griffRG7321
The essential Jazz solos:

1. Black Star - Yngwie Malmsteen
2. Hey Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley
3. Bizzare Love Triangle '94 - New Order
4. Violin Concerto no.1 - Syzmanowski
5. Rockin' Chair - Oscar Peterson


I lol'd.
#20
Quote by DiminishedFifth
oh no, learning them is easy. Learning them "In and Out" is hard. That's when you get to the stuff like "why did he choose this particular lick over this ii-V-I and why does it work?" or "how does he approach this odd chord and make it resolve so seamlessly everytime?"

That's what I was getting at.


that's all well and good, but i think that's largely a product of the education system behind jazz. don't get me wrong. i think it's interesting and insightful and comes with time. but not essential. if you know the sound of the licks and really focus on hearing the changes and reacting to them, your fingers will do the rest without even having to think about it.

imo. ymmv. etc, etc.

this isn't to discourage intellectually analyzing the licks and where else they can fit. i love that stuff. but i'm just saying i don't think it's necessary for the playing aspect. definitely preferable though.

also, i'm directing this at TS more than you. because you're just responding to what TS asked for.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Apr 17, 2012,
#21
TS. pick a standard and then transcribe a couple of different solos over the changes.

miles:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIDVoXfgA1g

red garland:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NeXZLqxsHA

blue mitchell:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avGCBKAg2fY

sonny rollins:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iDIfKSn-XI0

chris potter:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=rRwpx9BWQq4

JJ johnson:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ap26p2DiZY

another good idea would be to pick one soloist you like a lot and transcribe several of his solos over standards. then try to see if there are recurring motifs, phrases, licks, etc.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Apr 17, 2012,