#1
As you have probably seen many times, some musicians continue to "soldier on", with guitars that for all intents and purposes, probably should be recycled into particle board. Why do they do this? Does it make sense to you? Would you do it if you were touring? How do you think it affects the sound?
#2
The playability or emotional attachment? Some older guitars get really broken in and the player can't find another that plays near as well without getting custom built. Others gain an emotional attachment to it. I'm kind of the latter. I have a Fender Stratocaster that I modded the mess out of. Sure there are "better" guitars, but I love my Strat.
#3
Because Willie Nelson is cooler than you

I've acoustic that literally got blood spatted around inside the soundhole from playing it so much, I'm not ever getting rid of the thing so yeah...emotional attachment
#4
Quote by seljer
Because Willie Nelson is cooler than you
I'll concede he's a better singer than me. Although, either one of as a vocalist is an acquired taste.

On the other hand, perhaps he believes it would be a bit too ostentatious in not bothering to give the government millions of dollars in backs taxes, while he tours with a battery of shiny new guitars....!
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 13, 2012,
#5
Just bought a Takamine to replace the Hoyer I've been playing for 44 years. But I'll never get rid of that Hoyer, been with me for so long, and fits my fingers so good. The T sounds so much better, I bought it because I finally had the money to get a new guitar. Seljer's right, you kinda get attached.
#6
Quote by Mohican
The playability or emotional attachment? Some older guitars get really broken in and the player can't find another that plays near as well without getting custom built. Others gain an emotional attachment to it. I'm kind of the latter. I have a Fender Stratocaster that I modded the mess out of. Sure there are "better" guitars, but I love my Strat.
Part of the fascination of live performance, for me at least, is examining the choices musicians make, regarding their instruments. Sometimes those choices can seem a bit incongruous. For example Richard Thompson, (guitar, formerly of "Fairport Convention"), campaigns with a sea foam green Strat. It seems, "oddly out of place", in context. I suppose I'm expecting an earthier tobacco sunburst, or another similarly laid back or traditional color, more consistent with the nature of his music.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 13, 2012,
#8
Unless an instrument is becoming unplayable due to needing a neck reset or other major surgery, there's no reason to stop playing it just because it looks a bit ratty.
#9
Quote by strumandbang
Road worn guitars look cool. That goes for acoustics as well.
I guess I'm wondering if anybody thinks there is any philosophical significance in displaying a well used guitar. Is there a link to the artists persona? Is the artist making a statement?

For example, (the most famous example), is Willie Nelson's gut string. I suspect he's just showing off! But then again, I have a fairly dark take on human ulterior motivation. There are plenty of people out there, who are way more upbeat than me.

Another slant might be he spends too much money on pot, and not enough on guitars....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 13, 2012,
#10
He MEANS to buy new guitars, but keeps forgetting...

I think it really depends on the performer. In Willie's case, I'd bet dollars to the 100 donuts he'll be looking for when he gets the munchies that he really loves his guitar AND that it has become an integral part of his on-stage persona, like KISS' makeup.

Other guys, I'm not so sure, but I don't know their rep as well. On the electric side, though, I really can't say I respect the guys using the "distressed" guitars from Fender & others.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#11
Quote by dannyalcatraz
....[ ]....Other guys, I'm not so sure, but I don't know their rep as well. On the electric side, though, I really can't say I respect the guys using the "distressed" guitars from Fender & others.
In keeping with this thought, here's a true enigma for you.... http://www.ritter-instruments.com/princess-isabella.php

Click on the second thumbnail from the left at the bottom of the page, to see the "damaged desktop" finish...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 13, 2012,
#12
None of those is in accord with my personal aesthetics- especially the one you pointed out- but I think the butterfly one is well done, if a tad "girly."
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#13
kids these days pay extra to have their guitars aged for them. we should offer our services to the general public...we'll relic your guitar for free - will take 7-10 years
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#14
I like an aged guitar, I've never bought a new one actually. To me they feel and sound better once they have some miles on them. I'll even admit to liking the look of many of the road-worn models they sell, especially the Aaron Lewis aged Southern Jumbo. Obviously it's better to put years and relic-ing (is that even a word?) on them yourself, but once you get actual holes in the top big enough to put multiple fingers through it's time to repair or replace IMHO.

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#15
Quote by 1500 meanstreak
I like an aged guitar, I've never bought a new one actually. To me they feel and sound better once they have some miles on them.
Just make sure any guitar you get is a solid top though. We just had a furious debate about that, and the "plywood and glue doesn't improve with age" faction, won.

Quote by 1500 meanstreak
I'll even admit to liking the look of many of the road-worn models they sell, especially the Aaron Lewis aged Southern Jumbo.
Check out the link I posted above to the, "Princess Isabella". Now there's a paradox, a distressed finish on a 5000+ Euro custom solid body.

Quote by 1500 meanstreak
Obviously it's better to put years and relic-ing (is that even a word?)
No, it's not a word, and don't use it again! It's "relic-cizing"...! (We're obviously kidding here )
Quote by 1500 meanstreak
...[ ]...but once you get actual holes in the top big enough to put multiple fingers through it's time to repair or replace IMHO.
But then, where on earth would Willie Nelson hide his stash.... ?

Great pic incidentally. A double take for sure. I though it might be one of the new Martin "X" series, kitsch pieces.
#16
I agree with the sentiment that it is in a way...endearing when an artist soldiers on with his guitar that he's clearly had for years and it has it's fair share of battle scars. As some have suggested, I agree that there is an emotional attachement after a while, and maybe you don't want to part with it. Aside from Mr. Nelson, one of my favorite artists that uses a beat up Tak is Glen Hansard. Like someone said, maybe it's just the persona they've built around it, but something about it just seems right to me. He's kinda a bruised and battered (sometimes dark) musician with a lot of passion in his work, and it just seems so fitting that his guitar reflects that as well. I like it, and it appears he doesn's suffer much (if any) of a loss of quality from the wear and tear.

That being said, someone that ages their guitar just because they want that worn look I don't agree with. If you haven't earned it then you shouldn't display it. I've heard of some people literally taking sandpaper to the tops of their guitars to scruff them up. Yikes!
#17
Quote by BoyLilikoi
That being said, someone that ages their guitar just because they want that worn look I don't agree with. If you haven't earned it then you shouldn't display it. I've heard of some people literally taking sandpaper to the tops of their guitars to scruff them up. Yikes!


While I wouldn't personally distress a guitar myself, I did buy one of AXL's Badwater line (they come "pre-aged"), for two reasons. One, it looks bad-ass. And two, it's going to be my gigging guitar. After all, if anything happens to it on the road, damage-wise... who's going to be able to tell?
#18
Quote by BoyLilikoi
I agree with the sentiment that it is in a way...endearing when an artist soldiers on with his guitar that he's clearly had for years and it has it's fair share of battle scars. As some have suggested, I agree that there is an emotional attachement after a while, and maybe you don't want to part with it. Aside from Mr. Nelson, one of my favorite artists that uses a beat up Tak is Glen Hansard. Like someone said, maybe it's just the persona they've built around it, but something about it just seems right to me. He's kinda a bruised and battered (sometimes dark) musician with a lot of passion in his work, and it just seems so fitting that his guitar reflects that as well. I like it, and it appears he doesn's suffer much (if any) of a loss of quality from t!

In the seventy's, being hip meant having the most worn out jeans. The more patches on 'em, the cooler you were. That said, conformity to the counter culture, brought on another conformity, that of the counter culture. So, the long hair and the burnt out dungarees, were just a signal to others of the same genre saying, "hey look at me, " I'm conforming to being non conformal".....

Then, the fashionistas got a hold of the hold thing, and created distressed jeans, at a premium price of course.

The whole thing seems to parallel the distressed guitar construct. First you had to wear them out yourself, now you can buy them that way.

I think, whether it's consciously or otherwise, it's an artist giving off signals, "hey, I'm one of you".

Again in the seventy's, we had Richie Havens. He wouldn't even get teeth, because he felt they would interfere with the honesty and integrity of his performance.... Yup, ya gotta suffer to play the blues...
#19
Quote by Captaincranky
In the seventy's, being hip meant having the most worn out jeans. The more patches on 'em, the cooler you were. That said, conformity to the counter culture, brought on another conformity, that of the counter culture. So, the long hair and the burnt out dungarees, were just a signal to others of the same genre saying, "hey look at me, " I'm conforming to being non conformal".....

Then, the fashionistas got a hold of the hold thing, and created distressed jeans, at a premium price of course.

The whole thing seems to parallel the distressed guitar construct. First you had to wear them out yourself, now you can buy them that way.

I think, whether it's consciously or otherwise, it's an artist giving off signals, "hey, I'm one of you".

Again in the seventy's, we had Richie Havens. He wouldn't even get teeth, because he felt they would interfere with the honesty and integrity of his performance.... Yup, ya gotta suffer to play the blues...


You hit the nail on the head there. I live in a big city, and I see this every day, the "conforming to be non conformal" type of thing. It's fairly aggravating the people who take it to the extremes. Not to get off topic, but in a way it's a double edged sword. Because if you are trying to be a bit different in your style or whatever, then you'll be deemed as a "hipster" or some subset of conforming to be non conformal. But if you don't differentiate yourself in any way regarding fashion, then I guess your conforming to the mass public and are another brick on the wall. But these days it seems that there really isn't a way to be entirely original anymore, since no matter what style you choose, there are people who will run with it and it's a fad before you know it. No matter what you chose, a label will be put on you.

I do agree with the sentiment that they're trying to say that "hey I'm one of you." No matter what emotional attachment they have to their instrument, they are still aware of their onstage persona and how/who they want to relate to the audience.
#20
Quote by Captaincranky
Just make sure any guitar you get is a solid top though. We just had a furious debate about that, and the "plywood and glue doesn't improve with age" faction, won.


for sure, I have eight acoustics, two are all-solid, three are solid top and three are laminate. I take the cheapy lams to the beach, river, sitting outside etc. Nice to have but the one I bought in 1998 sounds the same as it did the day I brought it home lol.

Check out the link I posted above to the, "Princess Isabella". Now there's a paradox, a distressed finish on a 5000+ Euro custom solid body.


ya I looked at that, pretty funny, I'd expect the person who buys it to be mega rich and learn G, C and D before putting it in the closet to stay forever!

No, it's not a word, and don't use it again! It's "relic-cizing"...! (We're obviously kidding here ) But then, where on earth would Willie Nelson hide his stash.... ?

Great pic incidentally. A double take for sure. I though it might be one of the new Martin "X" series, kitsch pieces.


lol good point! and it is a nice pic, no doubt!
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