#1
this was my first electric guitar (I also now have an American Std Strat). I love this guitar. Its everything the people who reviewed it say it is. Except one thing... the tuners suck. It constantly pulls out of tune. New strings, old, it doesnt matter. They need to be replaced.

Assuming this is something I can upgrade? And also assuming its best done by a pro? Any ideas what kind of $$ Im looking at? I view this as a permanent fixture in my guitar collection so Im ok with an investment if those in the know believe its worthwhile.
he of tranquil mind
#2
If you get tuners that already match up with the holes in the headstock you can do it yourself with a screwdriver and a wrench . Otherwise a luthier shouldn't charge much for installation.

Grover, Gotoh, Schaller and Sperzel all make quality stuff. A set of decent non-knockoff tuners start at about $40, above $60 for locking tuners where you don't have to wrap the string around when restringing (which result in less string length which means your guitar can stay in tune better)
#3
Quote by seljer
If you get tuners that already match up with the holes in the headstock you can do it yourself with a screwdriver and a wrench . Otherwise a luthier shouldn't charge much for installation.

Grover, Gotoh, Schaller and Sperzel all make quality stuff. A set of decent non-knockoff tuners start at about $40, above $60 for locking tuners where you don't have to wrap the string around when restringing (which result in less string length which means your guitar can stay in tune better)
ok cool... good to know. I have a GC about 4 minutes from my house and know them quite well. That being said I dont like to ask too many questions because like me as they may they are all still sales people.

Thanks mate
he of tranquil mind
#4
....Your first guitar was a Gibson??? LUCKY. Anyways seljer pretty much said it all, just make sure to bring your guitar so you can pick ones that fit.
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#5
Check you're restringing the guitar properly. Also look closely at the nut and bridge saddles to make sure nothing's binding. When you have tuning problems with a guitar it's easy to blame the tuners, but ninety-nine times out of one hundred the problems are caused by not restringing the guitar properly. Following that, the nut and saddles. Gibson's tuners - in fact, even Epiphone tuners - are rock steady and shouldn't be giving you any problems if everything is set up and handled properly. Hell, Squier Strats with their crap tuners and vibrato bridges will stay in tune if they're treated right.

That said, Gibson LP Studios mostly use a common Kluson design. Any Klusion-style tuner should retrofit without problem; bear in mind that actual branded Klusion tuners are exactly the same as the stock Gibson ones. Gotoh do some locking Klusion-style tuners, though their gear ratio is no different to regular Klusions.

Really though you need to take the current tuners out and measure the post holes. Studios have had different post hole sizes in different years, so you won't know until you measure yours whether you are limited to only the Klusion-style tuner or if you have a Studio with the larger 10mm hole that can take a wider range of modern-style tuner.
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#6
Quote by grungelive72
....Your first guitar was a Gibson??? LUCKY. Anyways seljer pretty much said it all, just make sure to bring your guitar so you can pick ones that fit.
well... I also starting playing at 35 (about 3 years ago). I bought and acoustic and practiced and played enough to fall in love with guitar so I knew whatever my first electric was needed to be something I could continue to grow with and wouldnt frustrate me in a year or two. I played everything in that store and the guitar that just felt right was this one:


I took off the pick guard.

To be fair it wasnt the best choice for a beginer because I didnt know enough to get the right tones out of it. In fact I was so intimidated I didnt really play it for 9 months. Then I found a dude to jam with and Ive worked really hard to improve. At this point guitar is my hobby, my escape, my passion, my favorite toy, my sunday crossword and suduku... everything. Best thing I ever taught myself.
he of tranquil mind
#7
Quote by MrFlibble
Check you're restringing the guitar properly. Also look closely at the nut and bridge saddles to make sure nothing's binding. When you have tuning problems with a guitar it's easy to blame the tuners, but ninety-nine times out of one hundred the problems are caused by not restringing the guitar properly. Following that, the nut and saddles. Gibson's tuners - in fact, even Epiphone tuners - are rock steady and shouldn't be giving you any problems if everything is set up and handled properly. Hell, Squier Strats with their crap tuners and vibrato bridges will stay in tune if they're treated right.

That said, Gibson LP Studios mostly use a common Kluson design. Any Klusion-style tuner should retrofit without problem; bear in mind that actual branded Klusion tuners are exactly the same as the stock Gibson ones. Gotoh do some locking Klusion-style tuners, though their gear ratio is no different to regular Klusions.

Really though you need to take the current tuners out and measure the post holes. Studios have had different post hole sizes in different years, so you won't know until you measure yours whether you are limited to only the Klusion-style tuner or if you have a Studio with the larger 10mm hole that can take a wider range of modern-style tuner.
good call and good advice. I know because I took it! First the restringing... yes, my first few attempts were dreadful and I ended up wrapping the strings about 4-5x. Yea... bad I know. My friend showed me how to do it by threading the string, then sharply bending it in the direction it turns. Nice little trick because I can restring a guitar in about 15 minutes (30 stoned) and its not even wrapped once. That REALLY helped both the tone and the tuning.

But

Its still not there... the slippage isnt dramatic, and its usually all the strings.

In going back and reading the reviews of the guitar it seems the tuners might be suspect. Once you get past the 100+ reviews of guys wanking over their new ax you find the complaints that do come seem to revolved around the tuners, and thats one of the things Gibson went cheap on in order to offer a <$1000 Les Paul.

Replacing the tuners just seemed to fit
he of tranquil mind
#8
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Last edited by toneryder at May 28, 2012,
#9
i have always had luck with grovers. i have had them in a ton of guitars and i have never had one fail. there should be some direct swap tuners that would need drilling. pop them out, push them in.

i personally don't like locking tuners a whole lot.
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#10
Quote by MrFlibble
Check you're restringing the guitar properly. Also look closely at the nut and bridge saddles to make sure nothing's binding. When you have tuning problems with a guitar it's easy to blame the tuners, but ninety-nine times out of one hundred the problems are caused by not restringing the guitar properly. Following that, the nut and saddles. Gibson's tuners - in fact, even Epiphone tuners - are rock steady and shouldn't be giving you any problems if everything is set up and handled properly. Hell, Squier Strats with their crap tuners and vibrato bridges will stay in tune if they're treated right.




^^^ correct answer. I would bet any amount you name that your problem isn't the tuners. Unless the tuner completely fails (very seldom), they don't slip. Don't believe me? put a vicegrip on the tuner posts and just try to move them. You can't. they will break first (I don't recommend doing this on your new Gibson). Your problem is in how you wind the strings or they are getting hung up in the nut.

Having said that, you still may want to up grade your tuners. Better tuners won't necessarily hold tune better, but they will make it easier to get into tune. Locking tuners may eliminate your problem if you are having string slippage.
#11
Its unlikely to be the tuners themselves. Its most likely that you haven't restrung the strings properly, that the strings haven't been stretched enough (this used to be a common tuning problem for me. I complained of tuning problems on old strings when it turned out they never stretched fully. I had to use 11's in standard to have any decent tension on the strings because i never stretched them properly)

If you're hearing a pinging sound every time you turn the tuner, its probably the nut causing the problem, in which case, lubricate the slots. Even well-cut nuts made with good materials can have this problem in my experience. It helps with tuning problems enormously if the slots are lubricated.

The Kluson tuners on Gibsons are fine, they just tend to be a bit sensitive to touch.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at May 29, 2012,