#1
Hi all

Sorry if this is a silly question.... I have an Ashbury AM10 mandolin which I am preparing to sell. I wondered, is the bridge supposed to be fixed to the body or is it supposed to be held on simply by the tension of the strings (so that it would fall off if the mandolin had no strings)?

Cheers

Max
#3
banjos, mandolins, violins, violas, cellos, and contrabasses (double basses), amongst others, all have bridges only held on by the strings
#4
What I've never understood, though, is why? Because with a non fixed bridge, if you put the bridge in the wrong place, the intonation will be wrong.

I suppose this doesn't matter on non-fretted intruments, but on fretted ones, like a mandolin, it does
#5
Quote by masterofpuppies
What I've never understood, though, is why? Because with a non fixed bridge, if you put the bridge in the wrong place, the intonation will be wrong. I suppose this doesn't matter on non-fretted intruments, but on fretted ones, like a mandolin, it does


Sliding the bridge up or down is How you intonate it. With different strings, intonation won't always be the same. My Banjos have pencil marks on the skin as a starting point. My Archtop guitars just get a piece of masking tape next to the bridge feet if I ever have to remove a bridge. Same for my mando but most of time all you have to do is remove a and change one string at a time then check adjust intonation after the string change is done.
EBMM JP6, EBMM Bongo Bass 5-string, Heritage H140CM, ESP Tele Copy, ESP P-Bass Copy, ESP Maverick, Fender HM Strat, Ibanez ST-55, Epiphone Broadway, Taylor 310, Seagull S-12, Musicman Sixty-Five Reverb, Fender HRD, Ampeg B-25B
#6
Thanks for all the helpful replies. At least I don't have to sell the mandolin as broken now!
#7
Quote by masterofpuppies
What I've never understood, though, is why? Because with a non fixed bridge, if you put the bridge in the wrong place, the intonation will be wrong.
Nah, you just draw around the bridge with a "Sharpie" once you get it in the right location. Then you're gold when you change the strings. If you've got a Stradivarius violin, better use an "extra fine point".

(You know I'm just kidding, right )?
Last edited by Captaincranky at Apr 15, 2012,