#1
So on the 25 min essay section, you first given an random situation. You are then given the actual assignment. My question is, do you have to somehow synthesize the situation given into your essay?

for example, on the sat practice test online, it gives you the following situation that ill summarize: Watson (co discoverer of dna) was described by a fellow scientist as a lounger - he didn't do much. However, given his way he was able to make a very important discovery (dna). Then it gives you the assignment: write an essay on your position regarding whether or not people are more productive when given the freedom to act independently, and support with reasoning from studies, books, observations, and experiences.
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#2
It would make sense to.
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#3
I remember on my SAT essay, I wrote about Hitler and Jews. I got like a 650 or something.

There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#4
Was that background about Watson in that box with a short example paragraph? Just skip that box, always. The graders see thousands of essays based on the crap that they gave you in the instructions, so just skip straight to the prompt and don't even waste time on anything but the question itself. For your actual essay try to have an intro, a paragraph about a historical example, a paragraph about a literary example, and a conclusion, but if you're running low on time you can just cut the conclusion to a single sentence. Clearly, I finished with my own SAT very recently and am a horrible showoff. Also, I realize most of this shit doesn't relate to your question, but trust me, it's good shit.
#5
I'd refer to it occasionally but mostly stick to my own examples as support. they want you to demonstrate your ability to reason and come to a conclusion based on what you know.
Last edited by Arthur Curry at Apr 15, 2012,
#6
Yes. You should use the given scenario (Watson and DNA) to support your argument for/against the given prompt.
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It's not like bullshit, more like poetry.
#7
The SAT essay shows how well you understand the passage and use it as the basis for a well written ,thought out discussion .The two people who score your essay will each award between 1 and 4 points in each of these three categories.Reading,Analysis,Writing.A successful essay show that understood the passage,including the interplay central ideas and important details for your useful site. A successful essay is focused organized and precise with an appropriate style.
#8
Stop fucking bumping old threads
Come back if you want to
And remember who you are
‘Cause there's nothing here for you my dear
And everything must pass
#9
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#10
I thought bots were meant to be coherent these days?
It didn't take long to realise
The safest place was not her arms, but her eyes
Where she can't see you
For her gaze, it blisters;
Grey skin to cinders
#11
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I thought bots were meant to be coherent these days?

They have quotas to fill, and some of them drink to deal with the pressure.
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