#1
Hi all, I bought my first guitar with a FR last week, and yesterday I got it setup and re-strung with new Ernie Ball Cobalts. Now I'm getting a weird echo from my bridge with pretty much any note I play. When I rest my hand against the trem it stops.

Any idea what could be causing this and how to fix it?

Thanks!
My Gear:
Fender Squier VM Jazz Bass
ESP LTD B-5E
ESP LTD EC-330FM
Ibanez RGD7421
Jackson DXMG
Line 6 Pod X3
#2
Do you mean a sort of inherent reverb effect? That's just part of the nature of recessed and floating vibratos. The vibration of the strings is just enough to carry through the bridge and resonate through the springs. When your hand is on the bridge it works as a kind of dampener and reduces this. With a non-recessed bridge the wood the bridge rests on does this job.

If you mean it is a more direct doubling of whatever you play, that'll be because either a saddle or part of the locking nut is loose, or the string is loose within either; the string is kind of ringing out twice as it slips. Check everything is tightened properly (make sure to not over-tighten anything!).
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
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#3
Yeah, it's just a reverb. I suppose that's just something that you learn to deal with? I was considering getting a small piece of foam to sit under the bridge seeing as I don't plan on using my trem for pulling upwards. Would that work? Or a bad idea?
My Gear:
Fender Squier VM Jazz Bass
ESP LTD B-5E
ESP LTD EC-330FM
Ibanez RGD7421
Jackson DXMG
Line 6 Pod X3
#4
If you're going to do that then you might as well block it to dive-only properly. A bit of foam won't stabilise it. You could cut a piece of wood to the right size to fit in at the back, but the best way to get a recessed bridge to become like a non-recessed is to put some wood between the bridge's sustain block and the body of the guitar, under where the springs are (not on the other side of the block, which would stop the bridge from being able to dive). You need to be very precise with the size and you need to glue or screw it in so it won't move, but you'll be able to dip the bar down and it won't pull up. That will reduce the reverb effect a bit and make the bridge generally more stable. Adding a Tremol-No with the 'Deep C' on will also reduce the echo effect and improve stability while making the bridge dive-only.

That said, the only way to completely kill the reverb-ish effect is to block the bridge off entirely, take out the springs and basically convert the guitar to a hardtail. All vibrato bridges have a little bit of that spring echo. At least if you block it from pulling upwards it should stop the echo from being amplified but it won't take it out 100%.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
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