Poll: Should I begin learning Spanish?
Poll Options
View poll results: Should I begin learning Spanish?
Yes, learn the **** out of Spanish.
15 33%
No, do not learn the **** out of Spanish (stick with Swedish/English)
10 22%
Yes, learn the **** out of Spanish, and learn Swedish at the same time.
21 46%
Voters: 46.
#1
Hey you folks out there, I am a bit stumped as to what I should do. I am a native English speaker (and we do not have the best reputation for learning new languages), but over the course of a year and a half, I've managed to pick up a fair amount of Swedish on my own.

The only issue I take with this being, that I know no Swede's, and have never really had much of an opportunity to practice. Swedish is also not a very useful language, but I really like it a lot. (Jag tycker det svenska språket är väldigt vackra)

In any case, I am considering learning Spanish for practical reasons (I'm going to be a teacher, and the population of Spanish speakers is increasing dramatically here), but I'm not sure if I should. I do not want to learn Spanish and forget the Swedish that I've learned.

So my question to anyone out there who has tried to learn other languages, would my ability to use Swedish diminish if I were to start learning Spanish? Also, is it a bad idea to learn Spanish at the same time as Swedish? I don't want to confuse them. Also do you think I should or shouldn't?

I really would like to be trilingual before I die, and Spanish, Swedish and English seems like a good combination to me.

I'm going to go on a run right now, but I'll check back on this thread in an hour or so; forgive me for not responding quickly.


TL;DR: I want to learn a third language, but I'm afraid my second language will shrink if I do, and I want to ask others with similar experience.
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#2
i'm no expert, but i don't think it'll diminish your second language if you've got it down pretty well. i bet talking on message boards with Swedes will help.

#3
It shouldn't, if you keep practicing Swedish every once in a while while you're learning Spanish.
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#4
As with anything, if you don't regularly practice something, your abilities may diminish. As long as you regularly practice Swedish, I don't think learning spanish will cause you too much trouble.

Also, props for wanting to learn new languages, too many people in Canada and the US these days don't appreciate the value of knowing more than english.

Personally, I can speak English and Vietnamese both very fluently, but with my Vietnamese, i find that I am talking less and less with my parents in Vietnamese (the main people I speak to in Vietnamese), and am talking more in English. As a result my Vietnamese is really just a messed up version of broken Vietnamese with English words everywhere.
#5
Spanish is comparatively easy and if you're truly interested in maintaining your Swedish since you like the language, you should be able to learn both without any problems.
cat
#7
Go for it brah.
I'm a native Spanish speaker, I can speak perfect english and I'm learning French and Japanese.
"I wanted water but I'll walk through the fire"
#8
i speak english, french and spanish fluently. and honestly you just sometimes mix everything up, like you will know how to say something in two languages but not in the third one, and then you'll get confused and depressed a bit, but other than that, i don't see the problem. i didn't learn my languages at the same time so i can't know for sure.
#9
Quote by cubs
i speak english, french and spanish fluently. and honestly you just sometimes mix everything up, like you will know how to say something in two languages but not in the third one, and then you'll get confused and depressed a bit, but other than that, i don't see the problem. i didn't learn my languages at the same time so i can't know for sure.


Hmm, thank you for the input. I find the depressing part silly, but I like the enthusiasm .


Quote by zincabopataurio
As with anything, if you don't regularly practice something, your abilities may diminish. As long as you regularly practice Swedish, I don't think learning spanish will cause you too much trouble.

Also, props for wanting to learn new languages, too many people in Canada and the US these days don't appreciate the value of knowing more than english.

Personally, I can speak English and Vietnamese both very fluently, but with my Vietnamese, i find that I am talking less and less with my parents in Vietnamese (the main people I speak to in Vietnamese), and am talking more in English. As a result my Vietnamese is really just a messed up version of broken Vietnamese with English words everywhere.


Thank you for the encouragement. I think that I'll do some Spanish refreshing tonight. I hope I don't get the languages confused, but if I do, I can always backtrack.

Thank you to everybody for your input as well.

I just have to ask, does anyone know any good resources for learning Spanish?
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Last edited by Bushinarin at Apr 15, 2012,
#12
Just keep practicing them separately and you'll be just fine. Also, Spanish is a very sexy language while Swedish is pretty damn badass. That's awesome.

GRAY RAINBOW

#13
http://tesl-ej.org/ej45/tesl-ej.ej45.fr1.pdf

this is a good read before even learning a language. Kind of opens you up to learning new languages. I'm halfway through and find it actually really interesting and useful. Best read with a highlighter handy though.

It's pages or so, really not long. I printed this off at my college, we get 1000 pages per semester free.
#14
I've learned spanish and german, and only very rarely had problems juggling the two. It's doubtful that learning spanish will diminish your swedish.
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#15
In any case, I am considering learning Spanish for practical reasons (I'm going to be a teacher, and the population of Spanish speakers is increasing dramatically here), but I'm not sure if I should. I do not want to learn Spanish and forget the Swedish that I've learned.


Any extra language learned will potentially dampen your abilities in another language. You just have to find ways to stay fluent and able in all your tongues. Whether that's speaking with people or reading books (the most common way of staying in touch with it).

So my question to anyone out there who has tried to learn other languages, would my ability to use Swedish diminish if I were to start learning Spanish? Also, is it a bad idea to learn Spanish at the same time as Swedish? I don't want to confuse them. Also do you think I should or shouldn't?


I can't see Swedish being quite relatable to Spanish. Actually Swedish is not far from German isn't it? So besides the fact that any language learned, ESPECIALLY your mother tongue (because you will always try to reference yourself back to it) potentially dampens your abilities in another, you're going to have to put more work into it than say someone like me, whose mother tongue is French. That being said, everyone is different, which can almost negate my above comment. Some English speaking Texan may have no trouble learning Punjab but a bilingual Italian-German speaking person may have an immense amount of trouble wrapping their heads around it. Punjab is an extreme example though, those are very outlandish languages.

So you may have trouble, or you may not. Depends on your learning abilities. Look at me, my first language is French (canadian french), and I was able to converse in English by 4. My mother's tongue is french, and my father is english, although they are both bilingual. That being said, I can pick up an Italian text, and with little effort, be able to get about 50% to 75% of the material from the first read (nowadays closer to 80% in written, 60% in understanding spoken, speaking is a whole other ball game) mainly because French is very closely related to Italian. Same with Spanish, I can get almost everything of what's written, although I do find Spanish a tad tougher mainly because the vocabulary sometimes is unrelatable.

The same could most likely said about you (or you tell me? lol) if you were to start speaking Dutch, or maybe even if you were to give Afrikaans a try. I'll bet that you have less trouble over all learning that then Spanish or French. But then again, everyone is different. When you're learning a language you have to clear your head of your mother tongue, because instinctively your mind will wander towards it and try to associate it with the languageyou're learning.

The way I see it, pretend you're a baby. Babies come into this world not knowing any form of coomnunication. They have NO reference to anything, yet in their early years they pick up language skills because it comes to almost survival. That's how you have to try and see it, just clear your head. It's also why most people prefer visiting the country in which the language is popular, because in immersing themselves, they are forced to flex their brain mnuscle into learning the language. Whereas in your environment, there are so many escapes and easy ways out.
#16
Quote by Bushinarin
Hmm, thank you for the input. I find the depressing part silly, but I like the enthusiasm

You can't imagine the amount of times I've tried to off myself because I couldn't find the right...ohh...umm... Damn, here I go again.
Hi, I'm Peter
#17
Quote by zincabopataurio
(...)Personally, I can speak English and Vietnamese both very fluently, but with my Vietnamese, i find that I am talking less and less with my parents in Vietnamese (the main people I speak to in Vietnamese), and am talking more in English. As a result my Vietnamese is really just a messed up version of broken Vietnamese with English words everywhere.


Same here, being a franco-ontarian basically exposes me to a much larger english world than if I were to live in QC. It gets broken, anglicisms get shoved in and next thing you know you're struggling to find words. I work with actual France french people so that helps sort of keep it on a straight track. Mind you my mom and I speak french to each other so it's not too bad.

This makes me think of Creole for some reason. Which I think is a bullshit ''language'', it's basically just a carribean accent of carribean people who learned french, and who speak it very poorly, almost like children.
#18
Im learning spanish as well as a 3rd language. I know french and English. Spanish is pretty easy to me as it's rooted in the latin language just like french and english are, so they're a lot of similarities between each.


I have no idea about swedish...might be harder as I think it is not a ''latin'' language.