#1
Hi,
I'm working on a bluesy song, and in the middle there's a solo section. When I'm improvising over it my solos just don't fit with the song. They don't sound sad enough I think. Anyways, could you give me any tips on how to make it sadder yet still bluesy. I found on the blues scale there's a minor arpeggio in it, but I can't have a solo of three notes. Is it my phrasing that's wrong? Do I need to resolve on a certain note of the chord I'm soloing over?
Thanks
#2
try to bring out the root note of the chord that you're playing when you end a bar... or if it's a minor chord bring out the b3... the best thing to do is use your ears, if you have an idea of how it's supposed to sound in your head, work out how to play it on your guitar..
#3
Quote by FenderGuy909
but I can't have a solo of three notes

there is so much that could be said, but I always write really long replies and I can't be bothered right now, so... but this is the thing that stood out to me the most. you most certainly can have a solo of three notes, as long as your rhythm and phrasing are solid and interesting enough. in fact, it's probably easier to make something sound sad when it's just a few notes, rather than mad rushes of scales. try some really harsh clashes as well, so if it's in A minor try playing a G and bending it up, very slowly, to the A, passing through and lingering on the G#, then maybe a little bit up past the A before resolving to the A itself. sometimes a few very definite discords played in a way that sounds almost completely out of time can convey a really desolate, hopeless feeling. or that's what I think anyway
#4
Quote by FenderGuy909
Hi,
I'm working on a bluesy song, and in the middle there's a solo section. When I'm improvising over it my solos just don't fit with the song. They don't sound sad enough I think. Anyways, could you give me any tips on how to make it sadder yet still bluesy. I found on the blues scale there's a minor arpeggio in it, but I can't have a solo of three notes. Is it my phrasing that's wrong? Do I need to resolve on a certain note of the chord I'm soloing over?
Thanks



Understand the power of notes. Play the notes of the scale. One at a time against the solo. Do they sound like there's tension, sadness, happiness etc? You can't speak too well until you know what the words mean. Right now you don't. You know a group of notes and scales. That's like me in Italy with a Italian phrase book, and being perplexed because I really CANT communicate. Sure, I can mumble some words, and maybe get some essential things done, but look out if I really need to converse with another Italian.

Do you really think you KNOW what you're doing? You don't. And I mean that in sincere terms, not to make you feel bad. Please hear me. The ability to express yourself, comes from learning how these notes all sound together. That can be done by playing lots and lots or...by understanding and studying the power of these notes (for example, by studying and applying theory). You can be raised around it and it be "in your blood", or you can fight with it for years and years from sheer stubborn will and eventually get "there", or you can study and understand, and "see" what's going on.

That's not a slam, but I'm just saying that you're merely functional as a guitar player, as many are, yet, however you got there, you don't really understand or control the power of you're doing. You don't know the power of notes, and your ear cant guide you to where you can express yourself as if it were your own inner voice just yet. Try this....sing a sad solo over it...can you do that? If you can't, then how can you play one? If you can, then why can't you play what you sing in your head?

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 15, 2012,
#6
So maybe you could tell me how I could understand the notes instead of telling me what I do wrong.
#7
Listening to 'sad' solos will be a good start for you. Listen, absorb, imitate then create.
It's hard to sit here and advise you when I can't hear your song as you haven't posted a link to it - that would help.

It almost certainly comes down to your phrasing - one note played at the right time with the right phrasing can tear your heart to pieces.
#8
That's what they're doing. If they tell you what you're doing wrong, you can try to fix it. There's no cookie-cutter build to make a sad solo. It's not like there's a certain order to play scale degrees at a certain rhythm to make the perfect sad solo. It has to come from you, not us, we're trying to guide you in the right direction. I think there is some perfectly useful advice in this thread already.
#9
I think the real trick is to listen to the music, rather than chuck random licks out and hope they work. As for the 3 note thing, it may be a good idea just to start with 3 notes, and see if you can make it "sad", "happy" etc. It would definitely highlight the main point of a lot of threads on this forum, that it's not the notes/scale, it's how you use them.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by FenderGuy909
So maybe you could tell me how I could understand the notes instead of telling me what I do wrong.


Maybe you missed what I suggested?

The ability to express yourself, comes from learning how these notes all sound together. That can be done by playing lots and lots or...by understanding and studying the power of these notes (for example, by studying and applying theory).

Understand the power of notes. Play the notes of the scale. One at a time against the solo. Do they sound like there's tension, sadness, happiness etc?

What exactly are you looking for, that you haven't received...and
I'll try and help.

Best,

Sean
#11
Quote by FenderGuy909
Hi,
I'm working on a bluesy song, and in the middle there's a solo section. When I'm improvising over it my solos just don't fit with the song. They don't sound sad enough I think. Anyways, could you give me any tips on how to make it sadder yet still bluesy. I found on the blues scale there's a minor arpeggio in it, but I can't have a solo of three notes. Is it my phrasing that's wrong? Do I need to resolve on a certain note of the chord I'm soloing over?
Thanks


Try this:

Listen to the chord changes, and SING a sad melody over the solo section.

Don't think, just let the sounds come out of you.

Now find those sounds on your guitar. Embellish them with some licks to spruce them up ... and voila - sad solo!

(Of course, it's not that easy. If you don't have a well-trained ear, you'll struggle to sing something in pitch, and thus will have a hard time finding what you sang on the guitar because it won't be consistent. So you may have to start with some ear training).
#12
Quote by FenderGuy909
Hi,
I'm working on a bluesy song, and in the middle there's a solo section. When I'm improvising over it my solos just don't fit with the song. They don't sound sad enough I think. Anyways, could you give me any tips on how to make it sadder yet still bluesy. I found on the blues scale there's a minor arpeggio in it, but I can't have a solo of three notes. Is it my phrasing that's wrong? Do I need to resolve on a certain note of the chord I'm soloing over?
Thanks


get more experience, and then play with feel.

following step by step instructions for creating "sad" solos doesn't actually work.
shred is gaudy music