Ruark
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
487 IQ
#1
Many decades ago, for some reason, I picked up the habit of playing vibrato by moving the string back and forth ACROSS the fretboard, instead of lengthwise BB King-style. I find it infinitely better to do it that way, besides being used to it. It's much easier to control the precise speed and amplitude of the vibrato, for example, especially considering differences among the six strings. It's as easy to produce that "twwweeeee~~~" vibrato as it is to produce a very slow whammy-bar-type sound, because you can see, hear and feel exactly what you're doing to the string.

I guess in summary I could say, "it works for me." Any comments?
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Zaphod_Beeblebr
Shallow and pedantic.
Join date: Apr 2006
1,670 IQ
#4
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I'm confused, OP. Vibrato doesn't work lengthwise on fretted instruments....


Actually it does. It's a very subtle vibrato but it very definitely works, classical guitarists use it all the time.

TS: That kind of vibrato is what most electric guitarists do. Go you

Quote by AtimeforMetal
Unless I'm misunderstanding what your saying, that's how everyone plays vibrato on guitar. Since the string is resting on a fret it is not getting any shorter if you play vibrato as you would on a violin or cello. So, the only way to raise the pitch of a string is by bending it.


Actually wrong, by doing the sideways motion you alter the amount of tension on the string, thus altering the pitch. Same process as changing the tuning.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Apr 23, 2012,
Hup
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
10 IQ
#5
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I'm confused, OP. Vibrato doesn't work lengthwise on fretted instruments....


Yes it does. Classical guitarists use it often.
Macabre_Turtle
UG's UGer
Join date: Oct 2006
640 IQ
#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Actually it does. It's a very subtle vibrato but it very definitely works, classical guitarists use it all the time.

TS: That kind of vibrato is what most electric guitarists do. Go you


Actually wrong, by doing the sideways motion you alter the amount of tension on the string, thus altering the pitch. Same process as changing the tuning.


I've done vibrato by simply altering my tension, but I guess I just never thought to do it with a sidewise motion like you would on traditional fretless instruments. My bad.
Geldin
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2008
1,677 IQ
#7
You're fine. Ideally, you should learn any and all methods of vibrato that you can, since it gives you more options. Me, I like to use classical vibrato on my upper strings, a wider, bluesier vibrato on my lower strings, and on the middle three, I like to use a combination of the two. That said, I can do all three types on any string on the guitar; I'm just eccentric and like the sound.
steven seagull
not really a seagull
Join date: Oct 2006
1,064 IQ
#8
So you vibrato exactly the same way as everyone else

Unfortunately this has zero legs as far as discussion goes
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