johnyere
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
1,069 IQ
#1
What do you do when you don't feel like practcing?

Should i just skip a day, or tough it out?
ayreon37
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2008
71 IQ
#2
Tough it out. You let yourself skip a day, it turns into a week before you know it. Schedule an off day each week so you're even on a schedule when you're off. Best way to keep up.
johnyere
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
1,069 IQ
#3
Thanks, i decided to just suck it up and practice anyways.

It's tough sometimes, because sometimes i feel unmotivated with guitar in general, which leads to me not being to excited about practicing.
kratos379
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2009
914 IQ
#4
It's okay to take a break for a few days. If you force it too much, you're not going to enjoy it and may even quit. A couple days for a break can make you feel refreshed and ready to go.
vIsIbleNoIsE
The Asian-Viking Paradox
Join date: Feb 2006
1,540 IQ
#5
when i don't feel like practicing, i put on a tv show and just play chromatic exercises and scales that i already know. when i don't have anything else to do.
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MegadethFan18
Judge Shredd
Join date: Dec 2008
1,387 IQ
#6
Practice for what exactly? You make it sound like a joyless chore, if you don't want to play don't. If you are having to "suck it up" to do a hobby then it isn't a hobby anymore. I sometimes don't play for weeks at a time, guitar is like riding a bike you never forget.
Br@ndNew
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2009
75 IQ
#7
Quote by MegadethFan18
Practice for what exactly? You make it sound like a joyless chore, if you don't want to play don't. If you are having to "suck it up" to do a hobby then it isn't a hobby anymore. I sometimes don't play for weeks at a time, guitar is like riding a bike you never forget.

OH you forget!
Slashiepie
Banged
Join date: Apr 2011
492 IQ
#8
Quote by ayreon37
Tough it out. You let yourself skip a day, it turns into a week before you know it. Schedule an off day each week so you're even on a schedule when you're off. Best way to keep up.

+1
steven seagull
not really a seagull
Join date: Oct 2006
1,064 IQ
#10
Quote by MegadethFan18
Practice for what exactly? You make it sound like a joyless chore, if you don't want to play don't. If you are having to "suck it up" to do a hobby then it isn't a hobby anymore. I sometimes don't play for weeks at a time, guitar is like riding a bike you never forget.

This.

It's a hobby, not an obligation.
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bootsam
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
133 IQ
#11
I leave my guitar leaning against the sofa i sit on. Right next to me. So I tend to pick it up for an hour or so most evenings. Having it right next to me serves as a constant reminder. Plus when there nothing on the telly I just pick it up and run through the scales. I am a beginner, only 4mnths and having this beside me as a reminder helps me. My goal is at least 2 hours an evening and 4 per day weekends. Some days i am in excess, some in deficit but it all balances out in the end. I am really beginning to see the results of this. I can rattle through C major backwards/forwards and inside out.
Mephaphil
No empty frets.
Join date: Apr 2012
1,956 IQ
#12
I've been playing for years and years now, but it's only recently that I've realised that there are some basics that are holding me back. I've always been kinda happy with my speed even though it's not that fast. I don't listen to thrash or too much metal so most things I like I can play.

But now that I've decided to dedicate myself to blues I've started to learn scales and try to increase my speed. And only when trying to do this I've found that there are some things holding me back, so now I have to go through the chore in order to get myself to the level I want to achieve.

Mix the shitty chromatic drills and slow practice with learning something new, like a song.

I look at it like this: The scales, drills, slow practice is the vegetable fueled meal, good for me and necessary, the song learning is the dessert, and we all love a good trifle, right?!
tobinobin
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
289 IQ
#13
I don't know how far you can take a meal based analogy for learning guitar...but I also feel the same as OP. I really want to get at a very competent level of guitar playing, and realise how much time I need to put into practicing and in the end I only play for a little while/get distracted :/
Prophet of Page
Registered User
Join date: May 2005
258 IQ
#14
If you don't want to play, don't.

I know this sounds like a blunt answer, but the reality it's the best advice your going to get. When I was younger I went through a spell of about 2 years where I practiced at least 4 hours a day, and often more than 7 hours a day. I was obsessive about practicing and meeting the goals I set for myself. I became a more technically proficient player, but it was a very damaging experience overall. I became very results focused. Soon, I stopped enjoying the process of learning the guitar and only felt some satisfaction when I accomplished a goal. Later, everything I accomplished felt insignificant and gave me no satisfaction.

After a while, it wasn't just practicing and progressing I'd stopped enjoying. I stopped enjoying playing the guitar. I burned myself out (some bad experiences setting up bands also played a significant part here). In the end, I couldn't even remember why I'd put in all that time and effort. It felt like it had an been an enormous waste of my teenage years.

After that, I had to change my attitude and my approach to the guitar, or it would have been just a matter of time before I stopped playing entirely. I played acoustic guitar almost exclusively for a year or so, focusing on writing music, working on my rhythm, and trying to sing (that didn't work, but it was fun to try). I never let myself get stressed over music and the guitar. I gave music and the guitar the time I wanted to give it out of the little time I had to give it (starting in university meant I had a lot less free time).

The guitar was something I enjoyed again. Eventually I got back to the electric guitar as my primary instrument. I still don't have a lot of time to spend on the guitar (I'm doing a Ph.D at the moment), but I enjoy what time I do get to spend on the guitar.

If you want to hang out with friends instead of practicing, do it. If you want to take a night off and watch tv, do it. The rest of your life has to happen too.
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johnyere
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
1,069 IQ
#15
Sorry guys let me rephrase, I love playing/practicing guitar expect sometimes I feel unmotivated to do so.
What i was asking is, when i feel unmotivated should i just practice anyways?

Sorry i made it sound like a chore ahah.
Zaphod_Beeblebr
Shallow and pedantic.
Join date: Apr 2006
1,670 IQ
#16
Quote by johnyere
Sorry guys let me rephrase, I love playing/practicing guitar expect sometimes I feel unmotivated to do so.
What i was asking is, when i feel unmotivated should i just practice anyways?

Sorry i made it sound like a chore ahah.


Still no. You're never going to make enough money from playing guitar to justify doing it for anything other than pleasure so if you're not enjoying it or if you have to make yourself do it then don't.

You wouldn't make yourself watch a movie if you didn't feel like it, you wouldn't force yourself to play a video game if you didn't feel like it so why should guitar be any different?
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bootsam
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
133 IQ
#17
I cant practice enough. I love it. I cant wait to get home from work and run through the scales a few times before turning on my DF-2 pedal a tad and messing around. I'll then finish off my fooling around by running through the scales again and making naive bluesy riffs. I'm never gonna be a Peter Green or a BB King but that doesnt matter. I am having a ball. I guess its down to why you decided to learn in the first place. Mine was accidental and on surgeons advice due to a finger injury. Ive accidentally found a pastime that i really really enjoy. Including all the 'monotonous' practicing. I enjoy the practice; does that make me weird?
"I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I intended to be"
johnyere
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
1,069 IQ
#18
Thanks Prophet of Page, i really like your answer.

I guess I was being was too hard on myself- if i screwed up i got frustrated or if i didn't accomplish a goal i got frustrated, and we all know frustration is deadly when it comes to playing guitar.

I guess the solution here is just to play and to remember playing guitar is supposed to be fun.
Hou-Tex
Gary
Join date: May 2012
592 IQ
#19
No. If you don't feel like playing, don't! Youll, at least I have a tendency to play lazy and that's a step backwards.
MegadethFan18
Judge Shredd
Join date: Dec 2008
1,387 IQ
#20
Quote by johnyere
Sorry guys let me rephrase, I love playing/practicing guitar expect sometimes I feel unmotivated to do so.
What i was asking is, when i feel unmotivated should i just practice anyways?

Sorry i made it sound like a chore ahah.


I cannot truly answer that because I had a different experience learning. I didn't ever "practice". I played stuff I couldn't until I could. I had no schedule I just played when I wanted (which was most of the time) for as long as I wanted and that's still how I do it today.

Personally I think why should you do something for fun if you aren't finding it fun? You should get better by playing, not practicing to get better.
Muffinz
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2009
784 IQ
#21
Agreeing with the Prophet and all those with the same opinion. I also had strict practice schedules and what not at a time in my guitar journey, but for me at least, I started progressing even more when I didn't have a schedule and just playing whatever I wanted whenever I wanted because I found that when I was having a lot of fun I played for much longer than when I was forcing myself to do scale runs and sweeps and what not.

"You should get better by playing, not practicing to get better."
I think these are words filled to the brink with wisdom.

Also, Guthrie Govan has this approach as well so it can't lead you too much astray, can it?
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fishmike
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2008
1,063 IQ
#22
Quote by bootsam
I cant practice enough. I love it. I cant wait to get home from work and run through the scales a few times before turning on my DF-2 pedal a tad and messing around. I'll then finish off my fooling around by running through the scales again and making naive bluesy riffs. I'm never gonna be a Peter Green or a BB King but that doesnt matter. I am having a ball. I guess its down to why you decided to learn in the first place. Mine was accidental and on surgeons advice due to a finger injury. Ive accidentally found a pastime that i really really enjoy. Including all the 'monotonous' practicing. I enjoy the practice; does that make me weird?
hell no... there is really nothing I would rather do with spare time than practice. I totally get you on that. The problem with me is spare time... I no longer watch TV shows. I will tune into an event or game or something but I dont watch any TV shows anymore. I still work out and do some physical stuff but Im 39 and this is my first year Im not playing organized baseball and I couldnt be more OK with it... all because I would rather be playing guitar anyway
he of tranquil mind