#1
In your view is it easier to be a good rock/pop bassist or a good rock/pop rhythm guitarist? (obviously for genres like jazz and funk, it's easier to be a rhythm guitarist).
#3
Neither is "easier" than the other. They are both demanding positions requiring a lot of skill and knowledge. both have to know how to and be able to hold down a solid rhythm. Both require a considerable amount of technique. Guitarists - particularly jazz guitarists - need to know a lot of chord forms and be able to move between them effortlessly. Bassists need to know when "less is more," as well as when to play a lot of notes. It is not fair to compare the two. They are both niches within music that require a lot of the player.
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#4
^I will agree with your post to a point. I've been a rhythm guitarist and a bass player. As a rhythm guitarist you can be a bit looser with your sense of timing, esp. if you have a locked in rhythm section behind you. As a bass player, if you haven't got a locked groove its a major issue. There is no room for slacking in your timing.
#5
Bass guitar combines rhythm, melody and percussion and links the whole band together. Its also a serious workout to play.

Not to say rhythm guitar is easy (just listen to Mastodon) but bass requires you to cover all bases (baddum tshhhh,) focus on all other instruments and have a ton of stamina.
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#6
Well Rock is a massive genre with many different sub-genres. But for the most part bass and rhythm guitar are about the same (most often they are playing the same riffs xD). But there are some stand-out groups that have waaaay more complex basslines than their over laying guitar lines; take for instance RHCPs. But than there's nirvana, where the opposit is true.

As for pop. I say bass is way more difficult, well important is a better word. Not because of the complexity of the basslines themselves, but because the actual groove is made and depends on the ability of the bassist. This is debatable, but a lot of pop groups have done away with guitarists as a whole, and replaced them with keyboardists (or the evil of evils, the synthesizers >.>.
#7
Quote by MellowDeath
Well Rock is a massive genre with many different sub-genres. But for the most part bass and rhythm guitar are about the same (most often they are playing the same riffs xD). But there are some stand-out groups that have waaaay more complex basslines than their over laying guitar lines; take for instance RHCPs. But than there's nirvana, where the opposit is true.

As for pop. I say bass is way more difficult, well important is a better word. Not because of the complexity of the basslines themselves, but because the actual groove is made and depends on the ability of the bassist. This is debatable, but a lot of pop groups have done away with guitarists as a whole, and replaced them with keyboardists (or the evil of evils, the synthesizers >.>.


Being in Austin, the capitol of hipsterdom for the south, this is very true, why buy a guitar when you can get a $10 casio keyboard and a looper.

To my knowledge though, Kurt and Krist often played the same thing or pretty close, and neither were that "complex".
#9
Quote by askrere
Being in Austin, the capitol of hipsterdom for the south, this is very true, why buy a guitar when you can get a $10 casio keyboard and a looper.


Oh wow that's rough. It's pretty bad here in the Netherlands too. Pop, the slow degradation of the music industry

Quote by askrere
To my knowledge though, Kurt and Krist often played the same thing or pretty close, and neither were that "complex".


Hmmm, I wouldn't say their parts are complex, or that one part is more difficult to play over the other, but the guitar does a little more than the bass does within a given song, neglecting solos of course.

Take for instance Breed. The bass goes from the intro/verse to bridge (F# for a bar or 2) and then into the chorus, and then back to the verse. Where as the guitar goes intro/pre-verse (?) - verse (?) (the part where he strums the F#5 and does a lil pull off vibrato thing) - bridge - chorus - and repeat.

Smells like teen spirit. F-B-Ab-Db, apart from a bridge, that's all that the bass does really xD, the strum pattern changes, but not very dynamic. The guitar has lil more going on with the "meledy" part of the chorus.
#10
For AC/DC, bass is much easier. Though rhythm guitar isn't very hard either.
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#11
Quote by MellowDeath
Oh wow that's rough. It's pretty bad here in the Netherlands too. Pop, the slow degradation of the music industry


Oh yes, its now reached the stage in Utrecht where you now stand out for NOT wearing Rayban Wayfarers and acting like a complete tosser.....

OT: Bass guitar hands down, rhythm guitar always sound a little uninspired compared to lead/bass.
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#12
Quote by MaggaraMarine
For AC/DC, bass is much easier. Though rhythm guitar isn't very hard either.

For AC/DC the lead guitar isn't all that difficult.
#13
Quote by MaggaraMarine
For AC/DC, bass is much easier. Though rhythm guitar isn't very hard either.

The bass is barely audible in AC/DC songs. Listen closely and you do hear a couple of little pieces of wizardry every now and again.
TS there's no way to give your question a straight answer, take a step back and look at all the variables. If you're wanting the easiest option I daresay you're not playing for the right reasons anyway.
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#14
Quote by consecutive e
If you're wanting the easiest option I daresay you're not playing for the right reasons anyway.


That's the truth of the matter.
#15
If this were a superhero stand off...Bass wins, hands down. Sorry I keep on thinking that every time I see this thread title.
#16
Quote by CJ Noble
For AC/DC the lead guitar isn't all that difficult.

But it is the most difficult part of AC/DC songs. And some songs are pretty shreddy (like Squealer). But determine "difficult." I think any song isn't difficult for a good guitarist/good bassist. If you can play it in studio you must be able to play it live without struggling. So no song is difficult for the band who plays them.

I'm not talking about all the songs by AC/DC. But the songs after Highway to Hell usually have 8th one-note basslines. Of course they have some more complicated basslines, like "Love Hungry Man" and many of their older songs. But on songs like "Highway to Hell" or "Thunderstruck" the bassline is very simple. AC/DC's music bases on simplicity so all the parts are pretty simple.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#17
Quote by MaggaraMarine
But it is the most difficult part of AC/DC songs. And some songs are pretty shreddy (like Squealer). But determine "difficult." I think any song isn't difficult for a good guitarist/good bassist. If you can play it in studio you must be able to play it live without struggling. So no song is difficult for the band who plays them.

I'm not talking about all the songs by AC/DC. But the songs after Highway to Hell usually have 8th one-note basslines. Of course they have some more complicated basslines, like "Love Hungry Man" and many of their older songs. But on songs like "Highway to Hell" or "Thunderstruck" the bassline is very simple. AC/DC's music bases on simplicity so all the parts are pretty simple.

I love Squealer. the bassline is pretty cool (and simple and esay, i know, but really efective, that is what counts...) And i have to agree that from Back in Black to the present the basslines have become more and more boring. It is true that the bassist was different from highway to hell, but in that particular record, basslines are cool enough, :S
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#18
bass is a more "solo" instrument than "rhythm". I hate people to compare bass with guitar, especially as rhythm. Yes bass keeps rhythm and controls the music.. but you got the biggest freedom to add some groove





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#19
Quote by vaca11
bass is a more "solo" instrument than "rhythm". I hate people to compare bass with guitar, especially as rhythm. Yes bass keeps rhythm and controls the music.. but you got the biggest freedom to add some groove

You are kind of right. Of course if there are two guitars, they can't play as freely as the bassist. But if there was only one guitarist... Or like in Guns N' Roses. Both guitarists play different things and they play pretty freely. But I wouldn't say bass is a "solo instrument." I mean, you have a bit more freedom than the rhythm guitarist in a band with 2 guitarists but you don't play solos. It's a different thing. Solo is when you are the only instrument/the main instrument who plays a melody, usually improvised. And when bass keeps the rhythm, it doesn't solo. Bass solos are a different thing and IMO overrated (they are cool when one or two songs have a bass solo but not the coolest thing in the world. If you want to play bass like a guitar, why don't you play the guitar?) Cool basslines are the stuff!
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
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Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#20
Quote by MaggaraMarine
You are kind of right. Of course if there are two guitars, they can't play as freely as the bassist. But if there was only one guitarist... Or like in Guns N' Roses. Both guitarists play different things and they play pretty freely. But I wouldn't say bass is a "solo instrument." I mean, you have a bit more freedom than the rhythm guitarist in a band with 2 guitarists but you don't play solos. It's a different thing. Solo is when you are the only instrument/the main instrument who plays a melody, usually improvised. And when bass keeps the rhythm, it doesn't solo. Bass solos are a different thing and IMO overrated (they are cool when one or two songs have a bass solo but not the coolest thing in the world. If you want to play bass like a guitar, why don't you play the guitar?) Cool basslines are the stuff!


A nice bass solo has a different ambiance than a guitar. Sure guitars can do a lot more while soloing but they can't give you the same feel as a bass does when doing lead roles. By far it's certainly not the most practical thing in the world, but none the less it's fun and complicated in it's own sense.
#21
^ Yeah... I didn't mean that they aren't cool, and they sometimes are. But everybody's like "wow" when a bassist plays a solo but when guitarist does the same, everybody's like "OK." And that's what I meant by saying that they are overrated. Everybody thinks that bassists can't play anything but 8th notes on E string. And when the bassist plays a solo, everybody's impressed. That's what annoys me.

I play bass in a band and I'm really not a pro when it comes to solos. If I don't have an idea what I want to play, it will sound like crap. I'm trying to plan my solos in advance. We play some blues/jamming stuff and that's where it's OK when bass plays a solo or two. But I'm trying to concentrate more on the rhythm part. And we are a trio so there is a bit more freedom. Guitar-bass "battle" is kind of cool (when you take turns at soloing).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#22
Quote by fireraven
A nice bass solo has a different ambiance than a guitar. Sure guitars can do a lot more while soloing but they can't give you the same feel as a bass does when doing lead roles. By far it's certainly not the most practical thing in the world, but none the less it's fun and complicated in it's own sense.

Unfortunately bass solos are boring and self indulgant. They're only there so the drummer can rearrange his kit and the audience can have a piss.
Wood doesn't affect tone. Grow up.