Page 3 of 21
#81
I've got the tapes for Pimsleur Polish. Through about 3 of them now. My last name is polish, figured I might as well. Thought about learning russian, but didn't want to dive straight into learning the Crylic alphabet.
OBEY THE MIGHTY SHITKICKER
Last edited by Spaceonaut at May 16, 2012,
#82
My brother (interning in Germany, knows very little German) just sent me this:


"i walked into my boss' boss' boss' office because a colleague of mine said the former had the eggs necessary to cook the Maultaschen for lunch. i walked in and for some reason decided to talk german because i didnt know if he speaks english. and just said 'hast du eier' which literally means do you have the eggs. but he had a shocked look on his face and then people started laughing. apparently in german it's the equivalent of walking into your boss' boss' boss' office and saying 'GOT BALLS?'.

shit."


I know this thread isn't for shit like this, but can any German speaker please confirm this is true?
#83
Okay, I can tell learning Japanese is going to be a daunting task. I just tried working out how to write hello in katakana by doing it phonetically, and ended up with something that was nothing like the actual way of writing it.

Also, how do you know which script to use for certain words? So if I wanted to write hello, would it be Hiragana or Katakana? Or Kanji?

Kanji can be called the "main" script of the three scripts. For words that don't have Kanji characters, or for different grammar forms, Hiragana is used. Of course, it goes much deeper than that, but that's the general idea.

Katakana is used for foreign-language loandwords like terebi [television] and pasokon [personal computer]. Katakana is also used to write names. Now, names are always written in Kanji [with a few exceptions, when the parents don't want to use Kanji], but since there are many ways to pronounce even a single Kanji, naming can get a bit ambiguous. So, on things like business cards, people usually write their name alongside the Kanji in Katakana, so that it's clear to the receiver as to what the pronunciation is.

As for saying "hallo", there are many ways. You can simply say "hallo", but in a Japanese accent, which would be "ha-ro". Since that's a loanword, you write it in Katakana. It'd look like this - ハロ

In "proper" Japanese, one usually says "konnichiwa". Now, greeting people according to the time of day is very important, so there isn't a direct translation to "hallo" as such. So, depending on the time of day, you can say different things. But, "konnichiwa" is generally accepted as an appropriate way of saying hallo to someone.

Since "konnichiwa" is a native Japanese word, but doesn't have a Kanji, you're expected to write it in Hiragana - こんにちは

You'll notice that I've written the "wa" as "ha". There's an explanation to that. In Japanese, the marker "wa" is written as "ha", but pronounced "wa". Silly, I know. But, that's just the way it is.

"Konnichiwa" is essentially "konnichi" [today] and "wa" [is]. So, yeah, when you're saying hallo to someone, you're literally saying "today is".
Last edited by hriday_hazarika at Feb 24, 2013,
#84
Quote by Kensai
You caught me, the entire thread is a ruse

I actually don't know what it does besides get me friends on busuu. It's supposed to give me the travel course but I already have it

Btw I see a lot of people signing up for busuu but I've only had two people verfiied. What gives?

I'm signing up but not using your reference link to spite you.
#85
Spanish (native)
Quote by Pleasure2kill
The truth is, Muslims never apologized for their faith having something to do with the attacks on 9/11.
#86
Just added a whole bunch of stuff to the OPs. If I missed anything or something needs changing, let me know


Quote by RU Experienced?
I'm signing up but not using your reference link to spite you.

You are dead to me.
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#89
Quote by hriday_hazarika


Kanji can be called the "main" script of the three scripts. For words that don't have Kanji characters, or for different grammar forms, Hiragana is used. Of course, it goes much deeper than that, but that's the general idea.

Katakana is used for foreign-language loandwords like terebi [television] and pasokon [personal computer]. Katakana is also used to write names. Now, names are always written in Kanji [with a few exceptions, when the parents don't want to use Kanji], but since there are many ways to pronounce even a single Kanji, naming can get a bit ambiguous. So, on things like business cards, people usually write their name alongside the Kanji in Katakana, so that it's clear to the receiver as to what the pronunciation is.

As for saying "hallo", there are many ways. You can simply say "hallo", but in a Japanese accent, which would be "ha-ro". Since that's a loanword, you write it in Katakana. It'd look like this - ハロ

In "proper" Japanese, one usually says "konnichiwa". Now, greeting people according to the time of day is very important, so there isn't a direct translation to "hallo" as such. So, depending on the time of day, you can say different things. But, "konnichiwa" is generally accepted as an appropriate way of saying hallo to someone.

Since "konnichiwa" is a native Japanese word, but doesn't have a Kanji, you're expected to write it in Hiragana - こんいちは

You'll notice that I've written the "wa" as "ha". There's an explanation to that. In Japanese, the marker "wa" is written as "ha", but pronounced "wa". Silly, I know. But, that's just the way it is.

"Konnichiwa" is essentially "konnichi" [today] and "wa" [is]. So, yeah, when you're saying hallo to someone, you're literally saying "today is".

Wow you are really helpful I was trying to write out konnichiwa in Hiragana, but I couldn't find the symbol for chi on the app I was using so I tried in Katakana instead. Now that I've checked again, I see it straight away in the Hiragana section though

If I did use わ (wa) instead of は (ha), would that make the word different?
#90
Quote by akack
My brother (interning in Germany, knows very little German) just sent me this:


"i walked into my boss' boss' boss' office because a colleague of mine said the former had the eggs necessary to cook the Maultaschen for lunch. i walked in and for some reason decided to talk german because i didnt know if he speaks english. and just said 'hast du eier' which literally means do you have the eggs. but he had a shocked look on his face and then people started laughing. apparently in german it's the equivalent of walking into your boss' boss' boss' office and saying 'GOT BALLS?'.

shit."


I know this thread isn't for shit like this, but can any German speaker please confirm this is true?


In Spanish, they use their word for eggs (huevos) to mean balls. Maybe it's the same in German?

I am a native English speaker and I speak OK Spanish.
#91
I speaks the Russian.
Native tongue
^^ Hahah, I'm just kidding.. or am I?


Don't click this.
#92
Quote by RU Experienced?
http://duolingo.com/

This is supposed to be a nifty site, but it's currently in closed beta. Might want to throw it in the OP anyway.

Not too crazy about putting a website currently in closed beta that no one has tried in the OP. I signed up for chinese but it's still on "coming soon". The background looks similar to busuu's for that matter!
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#94
Oh, I get it, you're trying to streamline all the traffic through your little busuu reference link even if it's at the cost of impeding the learning of the fine members of the pit. Don't think you'll get away with this; you may be able to silence me but sooner or later the truth will come out and the people will revolt.
#95
I used to speak a little of a Native American language, Muscogee Creek, but I've forgotten most of it. I can still read it a little.
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#96
I'm intermediate in French and Italian I guess...
Quote by the_white_bunny
your just a simpleton that cant understand strategy apparently.

Quote by the_white_bunny
all hail king of the penis sucking(i said balls. you said dick for some reason?) Isabiggles
#97
Spanish is my native

I'd say I'm Intermediate in English since I can read and write but my spoken English is shit.

I've been wanting to learn either German, Italian or Portuguese, but the last two seem to be the easiest and most accessible and useful for me right now.

Edit: Also I remember using this site a while ago to try and learn Italian but gave up too quickly, but it seems like a nice site.

http://www.livemocha.com/
Last edited by VillainousLatin at May 16, 2012,
#98


Thanks, man. Let me know if you need any other help. It's not like I know much either, but I'll try to help to the best of my abilities.

Most people would understand if you used わ instead of は, but like I said, it's a rule, and you have to follow it. Keep in mind that the wa-ha transformation only applies if wa is being used as a marker to something, for example: "watashi wa AnAngrySquirrel desu", which shall be written as "watashi ha AnAngrySquirrel desu" [notice how the "wa" in "watashi" doesn't change to "ha"]. Suppose you want to write something like watashi or wasabi in Hiragana, you have to use the regular wa.

Also, on the subject of casually greeting people, lots of young Japanese people also say things like "yo" or "yahoo" to say hallo to someone, so you can use those terms too. Since they're loanwords, you're expected to write them in Katakana, but no one will mind if you write them in Hiragana, so feel free to use either one.

Right, that makes sense. Thanks a lot
#99
Italian speaker here. 16/16 years of living in this country says i'm pretty good
#100
Slovene (Native)

English (Expert); I can read and write it fluently, but my Slavic accent doesn't exactly make it easy for me to pronounce things. I'd put it between Intermediate and Expert but if I have to choose I'd pick the latter.

French (was Learning)
Italian (Learning)


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
Last edited by JamSessionFreak at May 16, 2012,
#101
You're missing some Hebrew here.
*points to self*
BEWARE THE BANANA ARMY.

I SAY, I SAY, BEWARE THE BANANA ARMY.

They say when they finally attack, all the impostors will peel themselves. In order to tell if you have been assimilated, check for a zipper somewhere near your pelvis.


#102
I took four years of Latin in high school, so I could help with basic questions. I really hope there will be some similarities when I start Spanish next year.
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LET'S GO BUCKS
#103
Quote by akack
My brother (interning in Germany, knows very little German) just sent me this:


"i walked into my boss' boss' boss' office because a colleague of mine said the former had the eggs necessary to cook the Maultaschen for lunch. i walked in and for some reason decided to talk german because i didnt know if he speaks english. and just said 'hast du eier' which literally means do you have the eggs. but he had a shocked look on his face and then people started laughing. apparently in german it's the equivalent of walking into your boss' boss' boss' office and saying 'GOT BALLS?'.

shit."


I know this thread isn't for shit like this, but can any German speaker please confirm this is true?


Oh god xDD
yep, that's true: Eier = eggs AND balls
it's just like "nuts"
#104
You can add me in if you want as a native of Hong Kong - Cantonese Chinese, Mandarin Chinese and Hakka Chinese speaking. I have an interest in learning other far eastern languages including Korean and Japanese, the former of which I know basic terms and phrases.

You can also add: Wikidictionary for learning Far Eastern Languages. It's a great tool for learning characters and the correct pronunciation:

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dictionary

Just type in any Chinese character and if you're unsure of the pronunciation, listen to the same on Google Translate.

E.g....

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E8%A3%A1

This is the character for "in". In Cantonese it is pronunced "Leui" (my romanticisation). On the Wikidictionary page, the Cantonese is writted in Wade Giles format as leui5, meaning pronunced in the 5th Tone of the Cantonese Chinese language. On Wikidictionary, it also gives you the pronunciation in Mandarin ("Li"). If you're not sure how to pronunce that, go to Google Translate and get an audio sample:

http://translate.google.com/#zh-CN|en|%E8%A3%A1

Click on the audio icon on the left hand side.

In Chinese, "inside" is written as 裡 面(Meen/Mi-en)- Cantonese Chinese is pronunced as, "Leui Meen", whereas in Mandarin Chinese it is pronunced, "Li Mi-en".

Test yourselves - what does "面" mean and can you find an audio byte of this word?

Use Wikidictionary. It not only gives you translations/written strokes in Chinese (both Mandarin and Cantonese) but also Vietnamese and Far Eastern languages - Korean and Japanese transliterations.

Disclaimer: A word of warning, Chinese is written in both traditional (Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore and Malaysia) and simplified script (China). The simplified script is basically a simplified version of the traditional script which is the same thing. Most Chinese people can read both but a lot of us still have difficulty in working them out because we've been brought up on one script more than the other. If you're not sure whether it is traditional or simplified - ask me or use Google to translate the characters in Traditional or Simplified script.

Here's an example of a bunch of lyrics written in both Traditional and Simplified just for you to get an idea of the difference:

Quote by Traditional

他的輕狂留在某一節車廂
地下鐵裡的風比回憶還重
整座城市一直等著我
有一段感情還在漂泊

對他唯一遺憾是分手那天
我奔騰的眼淚都停不下來
若那一刻重來我不哭
讓他知道我可以很好


Quote by Simplified

他的轻狂留在某一节车厢
地下铁里的风比回忆还重
整座城市一直等着我
有一段感情还在漂泊

对他唯一遗憾是分手那天
我奔腾的眼泪都停不下来
若那一刻重来我不哭
让他知道我可以很好


@Kensai: It's spelt Mandarin
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at May 16, 2012,
#105
Quote by Aralingh
A couple of questions that will determine whether or not I will learn a new language,


Do I need french in Canada?
Do I need norwegian in Norway?

Other than that, I know russian, english and estonian.


Depends, eastern Canada, probably. Yet again, pretty much everyone speaks English. Even in Montreal there are a lot of English speakers. It's more when you get toward Quebec city and in places like Lac St-Jean and Trois-Rivieres and all those up the boot places.

Isn't there like a main dialect in Norway? Like Nynorsk or Bokmal or something?
#106
Quote by TheTee56
You're missing some Hebrew here.
*points to self*

I've tried to poke and prod into Hebrew. But man oh man, how do you differentiate between the letters!! I have a feeling I'd have an easier time learning Arabic.

I would like to learn Hebrew though. Speaking it would be cool just because not many people even know about it around here. They would just attribute it to speaking ''jew'' or something like that.
#107
Quote by ErikLensherr
Guten Tag. Woher kommen Sie? Haben Sie ein Auto?

Good day, how are you, do you have an auto (car) ?

Is that right? I'd just figure I'd take a shot at it. I actually didn't use any translating, just went on a whim. Haben is have right? I have no clue what woher could be.
#108
Quote by metalblaster
Good day, how are you, do you have an auto (car) ?

Is that right? I'd just figure I'd take a shot at it. I actually didn't use any translating, just went on a whim. Haben is have right? I have no clue what woher could be.

I know almost zero German but if I'd had to guess 'Woher kommen Sie?' = 'Where do you come from?'. I'll check google and edit.

EDIT:

Nailed it.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
Last edited by JamSessionFreak at May 16, 2012,
#109
Quote by JamSessionFreak
I know almost zero German but if I'd had to guess 'Woher kommen Sie?' = 'Where do you come from?'. I'll check google and edit.

shit you're probably right man, woher=sounds like ''where''. Kommen sie is pretty self-explanatory.
#110
Anyone wanna clarify this for me please:

From wiki

The basic word order, both in conversation and the written language, is subject–verb–object in transitive clauses, and free word order in intransitive clauses. However, because the relations are marked by inflection, considerable latitude in word order is allowed even in transitive clauses, and all the permutations can be used. For example, the words in the phrase "я пошёл в магазин" ('I went to the store') can be arranged

Я пошёл в магазин. (I went to the store)
Я в магазин пошёл. (I to the store went)
Пошёл я в магазин. (Went I to the store)
Пошёл в магазин я. (Went to the store I)
В магазин я пошёл. (To the store I went)
В магазин пошёл я. (To the store went I)

while maintaining grammatical correctness. Note, however, that the order of the phrase "в магазин" is kept constant


Am I mistaken, or does this mean that a sentence can pretty much be said in any order? As long as the ''v magazin'' is kept together? (in this case)

So saying this sentence in the form of ''went to the store I'' is still correct because ''the store'' is kept together (the ''the'' and ''store''). Doesn't this sound off if you're speaking to someone? Maybe I just have a hard time wrapping my head around this.
#111
@Kensai: put me under Italian, native already i need to feel important here
#112
Oh, and I am an a native of an English speaking country. (Scotland)


Thanks for the Japanese resources Kensai
#113
Quote by RU Experienced?
Oh, I get it, you're trying to streamline all the traffic through your little busuu reference link even if it's at the cost of impeding the learning of the fine members of the pit. Don't think you'll get away with this; you may be able to silence me but sooner or later the truth will come out and the people will revolt.

Well I'm sorry for not including a resource no one has tested or can gain access to without being invited

Quote by Harmonius
*text*

Well, I just had to add a bunch of stuff

Just kidding though, 谢谢. If anything is incorrect, let me know!

Quote by Basti95
@Kensai: put me under Italian, native already i need to feel important here


Made it EXTRA CLEAR

Quote by TheTones
Oh, and I am an a native of an English speaking country. (Scotland)


Thanks for the Japanese resources Kensai

Don't thank me, thank hriday_hazarika
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#114
Quote by metalblaster
shit you're probably right man, woher=sounds like ''where''. Kommen sie is pretty self-explanatory.

Yeah, woher specifically means "where from"
Quote by EpiExplorer
I swear this guy in particular writes for the telegraph or some shit.

Quote by Fat Lard
My name can actually be traced back to as early as the 1990s, it means "fuck off data miner"
#115
Put me down for English as native, and learning Russian and Spanish.

I don't know why everybody says the case system is so tough. If your grammar is good, it really isn't that tough to understand.
Minecraft: Sonic
League of Legends: CinoSRelliK


Currently Playing/listening to/Reading:


Kerbal Space Program,
Binding of Isaac
Opeth - Orchid
S. by Doug Dorst
The Martian by Andy Weir
#117
I just got an email from Language Expert...I think UG is selling my personal information
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

#119
Quote by Harmonius
I just got an email from Language Expert...I think UG is selling my personal information


It's a sign!
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#120
Quote by Basti95
Molto bene Kensai

Basti, mio vecchio amico!
To be vulnerable is needed most of all, if you intend to truly fall apart.


Quote by due 07
You have no idea how much I don't want to tell stories about my mother's vaginal slime on the internet.


I make music sometimes.
Last edited by Gorelord666 at May 16, 2012,