Page 4 of 21
#121
Good idea.

I'm a native English speaker. Technically, I'm a native Portuguese speaker, but I'm so rusty that I'm almost a beginner. I am fluent in French, native level, and probably expertish in Spanish.

I should really try and learn a non-Latin language.
#122
I'm learning Japanese and German.
私の名前はアジリョです

Quote by MarshmallowPies
I snapped my high E once and sliced my finger open, so I can only assume snapping the low E would put me into a coma or something.
#123
http://www.mylanguageexchange.com/ <-- That's another good site for learning. You exchange languages with other people through email.

Anybody here know Finnish?
Quote by Ville Valo
Hurting Linde is like hurting Bambi. You just can't do it.





You should click on those, I think.



I like My Little Pony. Come at me, bro.
#124
I'll try relearning some Russian, and maybe basic Swedish (so I can understand what they're saying in the Bridge).
OUT OF ORDER
#125
Fluent Korean speaker here. But I'm Korean.

I can also speak a bit of cursory French and I want to learn Spanish one day, Community had no influence on me whatsoever >_>
#126
Thanks for putting me in the OP you bastard >______>
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#127
I'm a native English speaker and I'm learning Japanese. I just got all the Hiragana characters memorized. I'm going to work on Katakana tomorrow along with along with a bit of Kanji.
Last edited by NothingRocks at May 17, 2012,
#128
I've seen a few people here wanting to learn finnish. May I ask why? It's hard as hell and fins make fun of anyone trying to speak finnish incorrectly.

Quote by N_J_B_B
Thanks for putting me in the OP you bastard >______>

YOU'RE WELCOME
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#129
is this a private party? or can anybody join in??
Thor! Odin's son Protector of mankind Ride to meet your fate Your destiny awaits Thor! Hlödyn's son Protector of mankind Ride to meet your fate Ragnarök awaits


E-ARCH NEMESIS of girlgerms007
#130
I can speak Italian (native) and English (probably better than my Italian), as well as French at an intermediate level. Thanks to my Italian I can also get by in Spanish speaking countries, but I don't really know how to speak it properly. I also studied Finnish for 4 years at school, but I forgot most of it
This summer I will hopefully attend a two week intensive course in German, which I plan to keep on learning throughout next year (weekend classes or something).

4 languages is quite good IMO, but I plan on adding at least a couple more eventually.

If anyone has any questions about Italian I'd be glad to help

Forza Juve


'e voglia 'e mettere rum, chi nasce strunz' nun po' addiventà babbà
Last edited by solo_freak at May 17, 2012,
#131
Quote by deathdrummer
is this a private party? or can anybody join in??


Yes. You must be sent an invitation, and you must RSVP in 7 different languages to get in.

Once you get to the door, you will be asked questions on conversational Russian, Spanish, Finnish. French, Japanese, Chinese, and Arabic.

Once you pass through, you may enter our party.

Or you can just come in the back way without anybody noticing and learn from there. I won't tell >.>
Minecraft: Sonic
League of Legends: CinoSRelliK


Currently Playing/listening to/Reading:


Kerbal Space Program,
Binding of Isaac
Opeth - Orchid
S. by Doug Dorst
The Martian by Andy Weir
#132
Quote by Gorelord666
Basti, mio vecchio amico!

Don Satana! How's-a life treatin you signore?
#133
Quote by NothingRocks
I'm a native English speaker and I'm learning Japanese. I just got all the Hiragana characters memorized. I'm going to work on Katakana tomorrow along with along with a bit of Kanji.


I'm into my second year of Japanese and we didn't start learning kanji until about 5 chapters of a lot of grammar and vocab. Kanji is rough, I would improve my vocabulary a bunch and learn how to say basic things before I start on it, it's painful. Especially since the same Kanjis can mean a ton of different things in sentence context.

One example is "Kiku: (To hear/listen/to ask) If you saw that kanji, it's extremely context specific to understand it's meaning. "Sensee o kikimasu" (Listen to the teacher) and sensee ni kikimasu" (ask the teacher) are two complete difference sentences due to one particle. If you don't understand the particles and grammer rules, you will be throw off. Those two sentences looks like this "せんせい に聞きます" (ask the teacher) せんせいを聞きます (listen to the teacher). You have to understand the difference between に and を to get it.
Quote by iantheman
I laughed at someone for breaking his g-string, and got sigged


Quote by Veil Of Osiris

You just made me spit out my Kool-Aid all over my keyboard.


sorry
#134
Quote by Kensai
I've seen a few people here wanting to learn finnish. May I ask why? It's hard as hell and fins make fun of anyone trying to speak finnish incorrectly.

Kind sir, Slovene has a third grammatical number - dual.

For example:
I = Jaz
We (2) = Midva (masc.) /Midve (fem.)
We (3 or > = Mi (masc.) / Me (fem.)

Not to mention our declension.

Example (A stupid one, I know):

English

I am a human.
There is no human here.
I'll give this to a human.
I saw a human yesterday.
We were talking about a human.
I was walking home with a human.

Slovene

Sem človek.
Tu ni človeka.
To bom dal človeku.
Videl sem človeka.
Govorili smo o človeku.
Domov sem hodil s človekom.

Now this seems fine and dandy, but there are eight types of declensions methinks; three feminine ones, three masculine ones, and two 'middle-gender' ones. You can basically figure out which gender-type to use but there is little logic behind knowing which of the three feminine or masculine ones to use. Also, many of them have certain forms that are also used in other declensions so it's sometimes very hard for a foreigner to know how to use certain words.

And you don't even want to know what kinds of things we do to words for the slightest differences in meaning. Basically I could go on for a long time but there's no point really.

I've never heard anyone call Slovene easy or even intermediate. I don't know if it's as hard as Finnish but I'm still sure it's pretty damn hard.

Now that I've streched my linguistical e-peen, I bid you farewell.



Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
Last edited by JamSessionFreak at May 17, 2012,
#136
Quote by deathdrummer
is this a private party? or can anybody join in??

You may join, but it'll cost you your firstborn son.

Quote by JamSessionFreak
Kind sir, Slovene has a third grammatical number - dual.

For example:
I = Jaz
We (2) = Midva (masc.) /Midve (fem.)
We (3 or > = Mi (masc.) / Me (fem.)

Not to mention our declension.

Example (A stupid one, I know):

English

I am a human.
There is no human here.
I'll give this to a human.
I saw a human yesterday.
We were talking about a human.
I was walking home with a human.

Slovene

Sem človek.
Tu ni človeka.
To bom dal človeku.
Videl sem človeka.
Govorili smo o človeku.
Domov sem hodil s človekom.

Now this seems fine and dandy, but there are eight types of declensions methinks; three feminine ones, three masculine ones, and two 'middle-gender' ones. You can basically figure out which gender-type to use but there is little logic behind knowing which of the three feminine or masculine ones to use. Also, many of them have certain forms that are also used in other declensions so it's sometimes very hard for a foreigner to know how to use certain words.

And you don't even want to know what kinds of things we do to words for the slightest differences in meaning. Basically I could go on for a long time but there's no point really.

I've never heard anyone call Slovene easy or even intermediate. I don't know if it's as hard as Finnish but I'm still sure it's pretty damn hard.

Now that I've streched my linguistical e-peen, I bid you farewell.


I only said it was difficult, not the most difficult. Considering the low payoff of learning finnish I don't see the point of it, unless you're moving there.

Spanish is a lot like that when it comes to genders. German is pretty 'bad' too since they don't have just masculine and feminime, but also a more neutral definer; "das". Luckily chinese doesn't have any gender stuff
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#137
Quote by Kensai
You may join, but it'll cost you your firstborn son.


I only said it was difficult, not the most difficult. Considering the low payoff of learning finnish I don't see the point of it, unless you're moving there.

Spanish is a lot like that when it comes to genders. German is pretty 'bad' too since they don't have just masculine and feminime, but also a more neutral definer; "das". Luckily chinese doesn't have any gender stuff

Wait, any gender stuff?

I want to learn Chinese now.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#138
Quote by JamSessionFreak
Wait, any gender stuff?

I want to learn Chinese now.

No tenses, plurals, cases or genders! It's pretty straightforward. The hard part is pronouncing and listening.
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#139
Quote by Kensai
No tenses, plurals, cases or genders! It's pretty straightforward. The hard part is pronouncing and listening.

My god that sounds so simple after learning French :| How can you have no tenses? You wouldn't be able to say you've done/ doing/going to do?
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#140
Hey Kensai where would you recommend looking for basic Swedish? That busuu thing has Russian lessons but not Swedish.
OUT OF ORDER
#142
Only English for me, Seeing as I'm from there lol, I'd like to learn another Language but i just know ill start and just won't stick at it.
#143
Quote by loose bowels
Hey Kensai where would you recommend looking for basic Swedish? That busuu thing has Russian lessons but not Swedish.

Why would he know, do you think a native Swedish speaker is looking online for resources to learn Swedish?
#145
Quote by N_J_B_B
My god that sounds so simple after learning French :| How can you have no tenses? You wouldn't be able to say you've done/ doing/going to do?

I dunno yet, ask harmy

Quote by loose bowels
Hey Kensai where would you recommend looking for basic Swedish? That busuu thing has Russian lessons but not Swedish.


Not really sure, sorry. If you find any, let me know and I'll put it in the OP

Quote by teleporters
I want to learn japanese. You have any ideas?


Check the third post in this thread, we have some links avaliable
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#146
Quote by loose bowels
Hey Kensai where would you recommend looking for basic Swedish? That busuu thing has Russian lessons but not Swedish.

Hey, if you need any basic help feel free to PM me and we could skype :B
^^ Hahah, I'm just kidding.. or am I?


Don't click this.
#147
Native English speaker. Tamil is also technically my native language but I can't understand it unless it's the super colloquial shitty form and im too shy to speak it and i can't read/write anything other than my name. so I'm probably less than a beginner.

I'm a beginner at Spanish. I probably used to be better but I haven't used it for over a year so I forgot lots of things.

I want to learn a lot of languages but I haven't picked one to focus on yet. I guess i'll post back when I decide.
cat
#148
Native Spanish and fluent English speaker reporting in. Looking to learn French and Italian.
My signature lacks content. It is, however, blue.
#149
Nice idea for a thread. Put me on the frontpage if you want Kjell

Dutch - Native
English - Native(well at that level at least)
German - Intermediate
Spanish - Intermediate, still learning but I can manage.
French - Beginner

Japanese - learning(and sucking at it)
Father of ilikepirates And icesk8erqueen8
every man on here who tries to touch them will get his dick chopped off.

E-married to Shyne <3



Officialy has OddOneOut as e-sexslave
#150
Native: English and Portuguese
Advanced: Spanish
Very Basic: French and Italian
Phonetic: German

Would love to try Arabic.
#151
Quote by wesleyisgay
I'm into my second year of Japanese and we didn't start learning kanji until about 5 chapters of a lot of grammar and vocab. Kanji is rough, I would improve my vocabulary a bunch and learn how to say basic things before I start on it, it's painful. Especially since the same Kanjis can mean a ton of different things in sentence context.

One example is "Kiku: (To hear/listen/to ask) If you saw that kanji, it's extremely context specific to understand it's meaning. "Sensee o kikimasu" (Listen to the teacher) and sensee ni kikimasu" (ask the teacher) are two complete difference sentences due to one particle. If you don't understand the particles and grammer rules, you will be throw off. Those two sentences looks like this "せんせい に聞きます" (ask the teacher) せんせいを聞きます (listen to the teacher). You have to understand the difference between に and を to get it.



Thanks for the info, but I already know how to use Japanese particles. You also use them to separate parts of the sentence if I'm not mistaken. If I were to write "I open the box" You would write it out: subject: watashi ga/object: hako o/verb: akemasu. Ga is an identifier/possessive used to connect nouns in this case. Wo/o is used to connect nouns to motion verbs.

So if I were to write it in Hiragana with spaces:

わたしが・はこお・あけます


I still appreciate the effort none·the·less.

Last edited by NothingRocks at May 17, 2012,
#152
Quote by Kensai
You may join, but it'll cost you your firstborn son.


I only said it was difficult, not the most difficult. Considering the low payoff of learning finnish I don't see the point of it, unless you're moving there.

Spanish is a lot like that when it comes to genders. German is pretty 'bad' too since they don't have just masculine and feminime, but also a more neutral definer; "das". Luckily chinese doesn't have any gender stuff


Technically, that's not true. We still have to write she and he the feminine and masculine - it's just that when you say "he" or "she" there is no real way to distinguish. "He" or "She" is pronunced, "Ta" < http://translate.google.com/#en|zh-TW|He%0AShe. Ignore the tone difference - there is no tonal difference but I'm not sure why Google Translate pronunces it the way it does.

He: 他
Boy: 男孩
Dad: 爸爸
Brother: 弟弟
She: 她
Girl: 女孩
Mom: 媽媽
Sister: 妹妹

Notice the "女" which is feminine.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at May 17, 2012,
#153
Adding people in a bit.

Quote by Harmonius
Technically, that's not true. We still have to write she and he the feminine and masculine - it's just that when you say "he" or "she" there is no real way to distinguish. "He" or "She" is pronunced, "Ta" < http://translate.google.com/#en|zh-TW|He%0AShe. Ignore the tone difference - there is no tonal difference but I'm not sure why Google Translate pronunces it the way it does.

He: 他
Boy: 男孩
Dad: 爸爸
Brother: 弟弟
She: 她
Girl: 女孩
Mom: 媽媽
Sister: 妹妹

Notice the "女" which is feminine.


I didn't mean it had a lack of gender words, I just mean it didn't separate words into masculine and feminime using definite article like portuguese (a, o) or french (le pomme).

I hope that's right anyways...
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#154
As I believe I've stated before in another thread, I'm writing an Oratorio, and the vocal language will be an entirely constructed language. Of course, I need to make the language first, so that is where I am at with it. The first thing I did was try to familiarize myself with IPA, which is the International Phonetic Alphabet. This is a useful guide for anyone looking to learn a new language (or constructing one of their own) because it helps you recognize and learn the pronunciations of different vowels and consonants, the different diacritics, and the tones and word accenting from all different languages. You can find the IPA online in various places, but my two favourite go-to sites are :

http://www.yorku.ca/earmstro/ipa/ (Interactive charts provide sound samples)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet (Provides charts and in-depth explanations)

When you want to construct a language, after familiarizing yourself with the IPA, you should choose your influences; the languages that yours will draw elements from. For mine, Operas and Oratorios are generally sung in the romantic languages, especially French and Italian. However, the influences I've chosen are Occitan, Japanese, and Norwegian.

Once you've chosen your influences and understand the IPA better, you can start developing the alphabet, both the pronunciation of the characters and the calligraphy. Once you've done that you can title your language if you so please, and begin developing words. It's best to start with basics like pronouns and pro-verbs. As the dictionary builds, begin constructing a grammar set. With enough practice, you'll be able to form sentences and paragraphs made entirely of your constructed language.

I hope this helped anyone interested in con-langs (Constructed Languages). And with that being said, I better start learning my languages lol. I know a bit of French already, so Occitan should be the easiest. Then I'll get started on the Norwegian, then Japanese.
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#155
Quote by NothingRocks
Thanks for the info, but I already know how to use Japanese particles. You also use them to separate parts of the sentence if I'm not mistaken. If I were to write "I open the box" You would write it out: subject: watashi ga/object: hako o/verb: akemasu. Ga is an identifier/possessive used to connect nouns in this case. Wo/o is used to connect nouns to motion verbs.

So if I were to write it in Hiragana with spaces:

わたしが・はこお・あけます


I still appreciate the effort none·the·less.



Ok haha your doing good! And in Japan they don't use spaces most of the time, i think it's just there to help learning. My teacher does it with us to, but the exchange students and my school tell me not to. It gets super confusing sometimes trying to read it, that is when Kanji becomes a lifesaver haha
Quote by iantheman
I laughed at someone for breaking his g-string, and got sigged


Quote by Veil Of Osiris

You just made me spit out my Kool-Aid all over my keyboard.


sorry
#156
Oh I forgot to mention that one language I was looking to learn, just for fun, is Romanian. I'm interested in it because of all modern languages, it is the closest to Classical Latin.
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#158
I am Portuguese, so if you guise need a hand, just lemme know
Quote by slapsymcdougal
I'm cockblocked regularly by my appearance and personality.
#159
I am a native English speaker, and I'm fairly good at Swedish (reading and writing are more my strong points).

I just started learning Spanish again, so I'd say I'm a beginner with that. Do you folks have any good Spanish resources that you would like to share?

I would love to learn Portuguese eventually too, but I decided on Spanish first because it will be more useful to me where I live.
I've decided that my signature is terrible. I'm open to suggestions.


Click me, or I'll die.


# Un-nominated in UG Top 100,
#160
Quote by Bushinarin
I just started learning Spanish again, so I'd say I'm a beginner with that. Do you folks have any good Spanish resources that you would like to share?

Yeah, just watch Spanish soap operas all day and soon enough you'll catch on.
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