Page 5 of 21
#163
Russian women (and only women) keep on adding me on Busuu...it's weird.

Anyway,

Speaks: English, (piss poor) and Francais.

Wants to Learn: Russian, Japanese, Arabic and improve my French.
#164
Quote by DonGlover
Yeah, just watch Spanish soap operas all day and soon enough you'll catch on.


That how I learned a lot it, ex used to watch it A LOT.

Sos mi vida is one of the few I remember well, probably cause of Natalia Oreiro.
Father of ilikepirates And icesk8erqueen8
every man on here who tries to touch them will get his dick chopped off.

E-married to Shyne <3



Officialy has OddOneOut as e-sexslave
#166
Oh, speaking on shows. The best way to learn Mandarin is through by watching Chinese Dramas. PM me for links and recommendations - I know where to get them with English subtitles.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

#167
Watching anime is also a good way to pick up spoken Japanese. Not the action crap like Dragon Ball Z and Naruto, though. I'm talking about slice-of-life shows like Minami-Ke and Natsume Yuujinchou.
#169
Kensai, btw - edit your main post when you say Welcome in Chinese. It's 歡迎 (Traditional Chinese). What you have written, 欢迎 is Simplified Chinese used only in China. All the other Chinese Home Countries use the Traditional Script and I hate Simplified Script

Here's a story you may be interested. Why is there simplified and traditional script? No one knows for sure but there are two explanations which are usually given:

1. The literacy of Mainland China was poor after the Second World War which is why the Communist Party decided to use "Simplified" script so that it was easier to write in Chinese - Simplified Chinese Characters mean the same as Traditional Chinese Characters but there are just fewer brush strokes (not the full character).
2. The outbreak of the Chinese Civil War during World War Two meant that the defeated Nationalist fled by a nearby island just off the coast of Mainland China (now known as Taiwan or to be more politically correct, "Republic of China"). The Nationalists continued to use Traditional Chinese Characters and the Mainland wanted to be different and adopted simplified characters.

Out of the two, I believe #1 more - what we learnt from highschool - but a lot of Chinese war veterans have told me otherwise.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

#170
Quote by Harmonius
Kensai, btw - edit your main post when you say Welcome in Chinese. It's 歡迎 (Traditional Chinese). What you have written, 欢迎 is Simplified Chinese used only in China. All the other Chinese Home Countries use the Traditional Script and I hate Simplified Script .


Oh, well, this is awkward... but I'm learning simplified chinese alongside pinyin
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#171
Pfft... Simplified Chinese Text is for the dumber Chinese population.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

#172
And dumb foreigners! Chinese symbols are difficult enough without a million extra strokes per symbol.
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#173


The picture really confuses me. Since Japanese used traditional, how come the kanji for learn is the same as simplified? The character for open is the same as traditional how ever
Quote by iantheman
I laughed at someone for breaking his g-string, and got sigged


Quote by Veil Of Osiris

You just made me spit out my Kool-Aid all over my keyboard.


sorry
#175
Quote by wesleyisgay


The picture really confuses me. Since Japanese used traditional, how come the kanji for learn is the same as simplified? The character for open is the same as traditional how ever


I'm not sure why that is - you'll have to consult someone who is an expert in Japanese. I can tell you that a lot of the times, the simplified and traditional is the same. This is because you can't get much more simple that the traditional already - e.g:

我有 = Wor Yau / Gnaw Yau (Cantonese) - The "Gnaw" rhymes with "Wor"
没 = Mei / Moot (Cantonese)

我 (TRAD and SIM) = I/Me
有 (TRAD and SIM) = Have
没 (SIM) = No/Not
沒 (TRAD) = No/Not

有 = Wor Mei Yau (I have not/I didn't)
The above is written in Simplified Chinese Characters and the above romanticisation is in Mandarin Chinese. You say this spoken and in writing.

有 = Gnaw Moot Yau (I have not/I didn't)
The above is written in Traditional Chinese Characters and the above romanticisation is in Cantonese Chinese. You say this when reading and writing but when speaking to someone you just say, "Mowe-Ar". 90% of the time, spoken Cantonese Chinese does not translate into written Chinese in contrast to Mandarin which is spoken as it is written. This is why you can always tell if someone is reading just by voice.

You can't get much simple brush strokes than the traditional for some like the above example, so they are the same for simplified but sometimes our language really takes the mickey like the character for and where the difference is minimal.

EDIT: I'll also like to point out to people that Chinese characters are usually based on pictures. For example, what I quoted about. You can see the character for "Open" as being this:

開 = Open = Kai (Mandarin) = Hoi (Cantonese)

The two, "flags" shall we say in that character are meant to be doors and the middle part is supposed to be a person. Consequently, the character for door is:

門 = Door = Mun (Mandarin) = Moown (Cantonese)

Here's where it gets inconsistent. These are the characters for "we"

我們 where 我 = I/Me = Wor (Mandarin) = Gnaw (Cantonese) where "Gnaw" rhymes with "Wor".

我們 = We = Wor Mun (Mandarin) = Gnaw Moown (Cantonese written and read only) = Gnaw dey (Cantonese spoken)

As I've already said Mandarin is spoken and read as it is written.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at May 18, 2012,
#176
Hello

I will have the opportunity to move to Brazil in 2 years time for 2 years maybe more if I like it.

So Ive started learning portuguese. Always wanted to learn it anyway
#177
Oh wow

I screwed up. My Spanish is about intermediate. My vocabulary is a little small, but I have very good grammar.
Minecraft: Sonic
League of Legends: CinoSRelliK


Currently Playing/listening to/Reading:


Kerbal Space Program,
Binding of Isaac
Opeth - Orchid
S. by Doug Dorst
The Martian by Andy Weir
#178
Quote by Harmonius
EDIT: I'll also like to point out to people that Chinese characters are usually based on pictures. For example, what I quoted about. You can see the character for "Open" as being this:



The two, "flags" shall we say in that character are meant to be doors and the middle part is supposed to be a person. Consequently, the character for door is:



Then why isn't the middle part 人 ?
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#179
Quote by Kensai
Then why isn't the middle part 人 ?


lol. No idea but people can be depicted in various different ways in characters - it not consistent at all.

Oh just FYI:

人 = Traditional and Simplified
人 = Person
人 = Ren/Yun (Cantonese)
一 = Traditional and Simplified
一 = Yi/Yut (Cantonese)
個 = Of (used usually in counting)
個 = Ger/Gor (Cantonese)

一個人 = 1 Person = Yi Ger Ren
一個人 = 1 Person = Yut Gor Yun

To use some of the things I mentioned in my above post:

我有一個 = Wor Yau Yi Ger = I have one of...
我有一個 = Gnaw Yau Yut Gor = I have one of... (Cantonese spoken and written is the same)

And just to confuse you...

我有一個 = Gni Yiew Yit Jak = I have one of (Hakka Chinese spoken and written)

And to confuse you even further...there are several dozens of Hakka varients, most of which are understood with a lot of effort in repeating and relistening. Prominent variets of Hakka are Taiwanese Hakka and Hong Kong Hakka - I speak the latter.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at May 18, 2012,
#180
Quote by Harmonius
lol. No idea but people can be depicted in various different ways in characters - it not consistent at all.

Oh just FYI:

人 = Traditional and Simplified
人 = Person
人 = Ren/Yun (Cantonese)
一 = Traditional and Simplified
一 = Yi/Yut (Cantonese)
個 = Of (used usually in counting)
個 = Ger/Gor (Cantonese)

一個人 = 1 Person = Yi Ger Ren
一個人 = 1 Person = Yut Gor Yun

To use some of the things I mentioned in my above post:

我有一個 = Wor Yau Yi Ger = I have one of...
我有一個 = Gnaw Yau Yut Gor = I have one of... (Cantonese spoken and written is the same)

And just to confuse you...

我有一個 = Gni Yiew Yit Jak = I have one of (Hakka Chinese spoken and written)


It gets really confusing when you mix traditional hanzi and cantonese into all of this

If I write yi gè rén doesn't that mean "alone" or something like that? And isn't writing yi rén enough when you want to say "one person"?
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#181
Quote by Basti95
Don Satana! How's-a life treatin you signore?

Bene. E tu?
To be vulnerable is needed most of all, if you intend to truly fall apart.


Quote by due 07
You have no idea how much I don't want to tell stories about my mother's vaginal slime on the internet.


I make music sometimes.
#182
Quote by Kensai
It gets really confusing when you mix traditional hanzi and cantonese into all of this

If I write yi gè rén doesn't that mean "alone" or something like that? And isn't writing yi rén enough when you want to say "one person"?


Yeah, that's basically saying 1 person or by myself. Like I remember when I spoke to my uncle a long time ago. I was selling my piano and he said that he'd come and collect it. I said these three words - "Yi Gor Yun"? (Cantonese) as in, "collect it by yourself?". The "yi rén" means "one people" but the "Yīgèrén" means "one person". You can say it interchangeably really but when written in Cantonese or Mandarin it's best to say/write 一個人.

More complex things:

寂寞 (TRAD and SIM) = Lonely = Ji Moure (Mandarin) = Jik Mok (Cantonese written, read and spoken)

http://translate.google.com/#en|zh-CN|Lonely
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at May 18, 2012,
#183
Quote by Harmonius
Yeah, that's basically saying 1 person or by myself. Like I remember when I spoke to my uncle a long time ago. I was selling my piano and he said that he'd come and collect it. I said these three words - "Yi Gor Yun"? (Cantonese) as in, "collect it by yourself?". The "yi rén" means "one people" but the "Yīgèrén" means "one person". You can say it interchangeably really but when written in Cantonese or Mandarin it's best to say/write 一個人.

More complex things:

寂寞 (TRAD and SIM) = Lonely = Ji Moure (Mandarin) = Jik Mok (Cantonese written, read and spoken)

http://translate.google.com/#en|zh-CN|Lonely


But 一 can also mean "a", right? So it's like "a person" or "1 person". How do you know which is which? Or does it matter?

Also didn't know you played the piano...
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#184
Quote by Kensai
But 一 can also mean "a", right? So it's like "a person" or "1 person". How do you know which is which? Or does it matter?

Also didn't know you played the piano...


You're correct in that context but there is no real character for "a". For "a" we usually use "個" which you already know, otherwise we use things like "a pair", "a set of clothes", "a pack of wolves" etc...instead of the 個.

For example:

一對/一对 (Simplified) = A Pair = Yi Dueway (Mandarin) = Yut Duew (Cantonese)

We don't use for "個" for things like this where we have our own rules.

Piano was my first instrument, Saxaphone my second, Guitar is my third.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at May 18, 2012,
#185
Quote by Harmonius
You're correct in that context but there is no real character for "a". For "a" we usually use "個" which you already know, otherwise we use things like "a pair", "a set of clothes", "a pack of wolves" etc...instead of the 個.

For example:

一對/一对 (Simplified) = A Pair = Yi Dueway (Mandarin) = Yut Duew (Cantonese)

We don't use for "個" for things like this where we have our own rules.

Piano was my first instrument, Saxaphone my second, Guitar is my third.


Is 个 = 個? And how would I say something like "a pair of clothes"? 个双衣服?
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#186
Quote by Kensai
Is 个 = 個? And how would I say something like "a pair of clothes"? 个双衣服?


The bold is correct. The red is gramatically wrong in Chinese considering clothes never come in pairs except for things like gloves or socks in which cases you would say: 一對襪子* where "襪子" means socks . If you want to say clothes you would use, "套"

套 = Tao/Towe (Cantonese)

一套衣服

* Note this is the Cantonese way of writing it. In Mandarin, a lot of people use "雙" in place of "對" which means double. You can still say that in a way but it's a little weird in Cantonese - you would never use 雙 in that context, never.

雙 = double = Shaung = Seung (Cantonese)

EDIT: What you've written (个双衣服?) is 個雙衣服? which doesn't make any sense - it says literaly "the double clothes".
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at May 18, 2012,
#187
Quote by hriday_hazarika
I'm learning Japanese right now.

I'm fluent in English and Assamese, and I'm alright/I can manage day-to-day things in Hindi. Also, since it's quite similar to Assamese, I can understand Bengali somewhat, but I don't know how to speak it.

There are lots of resources online for Japanese. Even a quick Google search turns up lots of useful stuff.

I also bought a dictionary of Japanese grammar a few months back, and it's pretty damn useful. On my phone, I have a J-E dictionary app that has many, many words with their kanji, kana, and, romaji forms, so that's been a huge help too. You should really get if you're on an Android phone.

I can only manage a few basic sentences so far, and I recognize a few kanji/kana, but I haven't been studying the language a lot lately, since my exams are right around the corner. Once they're over, I'll be studying Japanese pretty heavily, since watching anime and reading manga aren't marketable skills.

If anyone else here is learning Japanese, we can exchange resources and stuff, if you'd like. I know James [NothingRocks] is learning Japanese. Anyone else?


I'm planning on learning Japanese, it's just so daunting. A website that might be useful for you and the third post is http://www.imabi.net/ It's got a pretty extensive collection of lessons.

conor-figgy:

English (native)
Irish (native/intermediate)
Japanese (learning)
Spanish (beginner but not learning)
Last edited by conor-figgy at May 18, 2012,
#188


found this while wasting time on stumbleupon.

Can't speak to its accuracy, but it seems like a simple guide to the Korean alphabet. Doesn't really teach the language, but may help with reading/writing.
Rhythm in Jump. Dancing Close to You.

Quote by element4433
Yeah. people, like Lemoninfluence, are hypocrites and should have all their opinions invalidated from here on out.
#189
Quote by Lemoninfluence


found this while wasting time on stumbleupon.

Can't speak to its accuracy, but it seems like a simple guide to the Korean alphabet. Doesn't really teach the language, but may help with reading/writing.


I know basic Korean and that's pretty good stuff.
¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

#190
Am I the only guy who heard that guy in my head with an australian accent?
Minecraft: Sonic
League of Legends: CinoSRelliK


Currently Playing/listening to/Reading:


Kerbal Space Program,
Binding of Isaac
Opeth - Orchid
S. by Doug Dorst
The Martian by Andy Weir
#191
Awesome thread, busuu looks like itll be awesome. I speak English natively, I'm in between beginner and intermediate with German (learning in school), and I'm just starting on Spanish, French, and Arabic. Concentrating on Spanish most, French second, and Arabic least.
Last edited by TheZephyrSon at May 19, 2012,
#192
Quote by Harmonius
The bold is correct. The red is gramatically wrong in Chinese considering clothes never come in pairs except for things like gloves or socks in which cases you would say: 一對襪子* where "襪子" means socks . If you want to say clothes you would use, "套"

套 = Tao/Towe (Cantonese)

一套衣服

* Note this is the Cantonese way of writing it. In Mandarin, a lot of people use "雙" in place of "對" which means double. You can still say that in a way but it's a little weird in Cantonese - you would never use 雙 in that context, never.

雙 = double = Shaung = Seung (Cantonese)

EDIT: What you've written (个双衣服?) is 個雙衣服? which doesn't make any sense - it says literaly "the double clothes".



So you don't say "a pair of pants" or anything? Since "pair" literally has to mean two, unlike in english where it can mean one "item" of pants.

What is 一套衣服 literally translated as? Google translate says "a suit of clothes". When I put 个双衣服 into google translate it says two pairs of clothes which I guess is pretty odd if the word "pair" isn't used like it is in english...
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#193
I'm finding French more and more beautiful if I'm being honest. Sadly I'll never have the proper accent. Il n'est pas possible
#195
I have a vague plan to learn Norwegian at some point in my life, but no real motivation or plans to get it done atm. I've also heard it's a fairly complex language, any Norske speakers out there who can verify this?
Tool
Sleep
Gojira
Puscifer
Neurosis
Sunn O)))
Meshuggah
Modest Mouse
Electric Wizard
Mammoth Grinder


Lucid Dreaming Thread
#196
Le francais c'est tres difficile Mais amusent!


I don't like Busuu though, it's forcing me to talk to people who understand french and I'm too shy for that.
#197
Well, I am native Russian and speak English also. A bit of Italian, but not much.
#198
This is for all you Korean students, it's a very funny video but filled with bad words, mainly because that's the subject of the video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAkX1giNels
BEWARE THE BANANA ARMY.

I SAY, I SAY, BEWARE THE BANANA ARMY.

They say when they finally attack, all the impostors will peel themselves. In order to tell if you have been assimilated, check for a zipper somewhere near your pelvis.


#199
Busuu actually looks really helpful, thanks TS. I'm thinking I'm gonna use it to learn Hebrew because I'm certain that my Israeli family is constantly talking behind my back to my face. Might just learn Gaelic or something for the hell of it, I don't really know. For a native English speaker and meh-ish Spanish speaker, and recommendations?
#200
Quote by Robot Monster
Busuu actually looks really helpful, thanks TS. I'm thinking I'm gonna use it to learn Hebrew because I'm certain that my Israeli family is constantly talking behind my back to my face. Might just learn Gaelic or something for the hell of it, I don't really know. For a native English speaker and meh-ish Spanish speaker, and recommendations?


Irish is a funny language, it's incredibly fun and can sound awesome when you get into it but I found that there are a lot of rules when it comes to tenses, plurals, adjectives, masculine/feminine words etc. and although it's more structured than English as English has very few rules, some bits are a bit hazey.

...that was what you meant when you said recommendations about Gaelic?