bass94
Registered User
Join date: Feb 2009
10 IQ
#2
The extra fret on the second one will allow for you to go higher by a half step on each string.
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
30 IQ
#3
The first guitar, A 32 CP (19 frets ), is what is called a "12 fret" guitar. The body joins the neck at the 12th fret. It's an auditorium size

The second guitar is a "14 fret" guitar, (body joins neck @ 14th frat), and it's a larger, "dreadnaught" size body.

14 fret guitars a more common, as is the dreadnaught size. That doesn't mean it's right for you.

You need to learn and understand guitar specs a bit better, before you make your choice. (IMO, of course).

Not criticizing, jus' sayin', you'd be better off armed with more knowledge.
PrinceEvo
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2011
30 IQ
#4
oh hey guys.. thanks for ur reply.. im aware of the guitar itself has different number of frets and that the 12th fret position ... im just curious about the sound... since one guitar has longer one has shorter neck... how does it affect the sound because obviously the string is gonna be different length.. does it sound like its higher pitch?
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
30 IQ
#6
Quote by Telecaster7
They're both tuned the same, the one with the longer neck will have the bridge closer to the neck to compensate.
Huh? No, they're not even close.... Or perhaps, "you can't have a 24 fret guitar unless it has a longer scale".

That's similar to saying a, "Telecaster is identical to a Stratocaster because they're tuned the same.

You can find 14 fret guitars in auditorium sizes, and they're likely more common. Since you're dealing with an acoustic, body size will have a great effect on tone.

Granted, "parlor guitars" are most often 12 fret and short scale, but those bodies are quite tiny by today's standards.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 15, 2012,
Viban
UG's resident bum
Join date: Nov 2011
150 IQ
#7
its scale length that matters, not the number of frets, it could be a 30 fret guitar and it won't matter if the nut to 12th fret is 12.5 inches and 12 fret to bridge is 12.5 inches, it'll still be the same as any 25 inch scale guitar in terms of tuning. it'll just have more frets.

the inotation would be odd though
Quote by R45VT
Bastards.
Last edited by Viban at Jun 15, 2012,
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
30 IQ
#8
Quote by Viban
its scale length that matters, not the number of frets, it could be a 30 fret guitar and it won't matter if the nut to 12th fret is 12.5 inches and 12 fret to bridge is 12.5 inches, it'll still be the same as any 25 inch scale guitar in terms of tuning. it'll just have more frets.

the inotation would be odd though

Quote by PrinceEvo
oh hey guys.. thanks for ur reply.. im aware of the guitar itself has different number of frets and that the 12th fret position ... im just curious about the sound... since one guitar has longer one has shorter neck... how does it affect the sound because obviously the string is gonna be different length.. does it sound like its higher pitch?
OK, the overarching issue here is the sound.

The smaller guitar should be brighter, with a bit less bass. That's a broad generalization. And we can't give you a definitive answer, since none of us has actually A/B compared the two. Sorry on that point.

The issue of a 12 or 14 fret neck joint also over arches scale length!

Here we have the Jackson Browne Signature Acoustic from Gibson: http://www2.gibson.com/Products/Acoustic-Instruments/Round-Shoulder/Gibson-Acoustic/Jackson-Browne-Signature/Specs.aspx

Please read the specs. This is a 12 fret, huge dreadnaught, with Gibson's traditional 24.75" (short) scale length....... So, none of the 3 variables, body to neck joint position , body size, and scale length are necessarily interdependent.. By that I mean, they don't necessarily change at the same time.
Bikewer
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
10 IQ
#9
It's strictly a matter of preference. Many players like the sound of 12-fret models, deeming it superior in some ways to the more-common 14-fret layout.
Others don't.
If you have the opportunity, play both and see which one pleases you more.

In many styles of playing, access to the upper frets is not important.
Steve BP
Sonic Abuser
Join date: Nov 2006
60 IQ
#10
12-fret guitar lovers tell me that there is something special about the sound of a 12-fretter. I don't have enough first hand experience to confirm.