Volcz
VCA '18
Join date: Oct 2011
2,428 IQ
#1
On VOX amps, the Tone Cut has confused me somewhat.

What's the 'zero' (ie. uneffected) position of the Tone Cut control? I'd assumed it was all the way counter-clockwise, then as you rolled it clockwise, it shaved off higher frequencies, but upon reading the manual...

"Turning it clockwise will decrease the higher frequencies and turning it counterclockwise will add higher frequencies"

I'm guessing that 12 o'clock is neutral then? But then reading online some people are saying that fully counter-clockwise is indeed the neutral position, and that VOX might have a misleading manual?

Can anyone clarify on this?

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gumbilicious
beginner
Join date: Oct 2007
1,236 IQ
#2
Quote by Volcz
What's the 'zero' (ie. uneffected) position of the Tone Cut control? I'd assumed it was all the way counter-clockwise, then as you rolled it clockwise, it shaved off higher frequencies, but upon reading the manual...

"Turning it clockwise will decrease the higher frequencies and turning it counterclockwise will add higher frequencies"

I'm guessing that 12 o'clock is neutral then? But then reading online some people are saying that fully counter-clockwise is indeed the neutral position, and that VOX might have a misleading manual?


well, the problem is not exactly clean cut. the functionality of the 'Tone Cut' knob will depend upon it's implementation (passive or active EQ).

active EQ will actually have a preamp-like component that will actually amplify particular frequencies. if your Tone Cut knob is active, then most likely 12 noon will be the 'neutral' setting (but this will also depend on how the circuit is designed).

passive EQ will use a subtractive method (it doesn't amplify, it only rolls off frequencies with RLC circuits). if your Tone Cut knob is passive then "fully counter-clockwise" would most likely be 'neutral' (as a clockwise setting removes high end frequencies).

that being said, inserting a components into a circuit always effects the tone is some way. so true 'neutral' tone (in the limited sense you are referring to) would bypass the EQ control completely, and i don't think you have that option. best advise is just to set it where you like the sound.
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Roc8995
Moderator
Join date: Nov 2005
2,050 IQ
#3
I think the manual is a bit misreading. If you read that sentence again, you'll see that it's really saying (albeit in ambiguous terms) exactly what you said. If you turn the knob clockwise, you get less highs; counterclockwise, you get more. If you ignore the incorrect implication that it's an active system, it means the same thing as "rolls off highs."


There's no true neutral position for this type of control, but the simplest answer is that it's all the way counterclockwise.
head-case
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
41 IQ
#4
I like to keep it turned all the way down, and to my ears it sounds like no highs have been diminished. I plug straight into the normal input, nothing but the volume knob being used. Such wonderful amps...
cjc1990
Simple Man
Join date: Apr 2010
373 IQ
#5
Yeah every bit of knowledge I have and have been given on these amps says that fully counter-clockwise would be considered "neutral" or "off". I run it that way as well and jump channels, diming them, and just use the master. no tonal adjustments needed! Beauteeefulll