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#81
I came here to learn sean, from people like you, and I'd like to think I have. But its you regulars that keep me coming back, its you regulars that helped me decide to major in music, and although I didn't actually go into a music program my first semester, I still intend to.

So, in the seriousness that this thread had suddenly taken, thanks everybody for correcting my mistakes, and teaching me fancy words. :P
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#83
Quote by wbt1988
I have read that knowing the Major scale is the most crucial building block in understand theory.

I know the major scale contains a M m m M M m d I know its w w h w w w h. Well that seems easy enough. Is that all? Am I missing any information on the Major Scale here?

What would it mean to Subvert the Major Scale?

Nah that's pretty much it. play it play it play it.

It has scale degrees (R)1(R) 2 3 4 5 6 7 (R)8(R) so you know the step pattern between each note already. Now when naming chords and a musical staff and a million other things follow that musical pattern. It is a common relationship between all western instruments. And so you have been told and are correct that knowing the major scale is the most crucial building block in understanding theory. It's like a key that unlocks it all.

Subvert? Makes me think of Sub -> Subdominant: vert -> invert (inversion)*
If you think of a perfect fifth that's the dominant. You go up five steps in the scale (three whole and a half step - seven frets or semitones) that's your dominant.

If you go down from the tonic or root note the same distance (Three whole and a half steps) this is called an inverted fifth. The note you land on is the fourth scale degree. The SubDominant.

So you have a sub dominant being played as an inverted fifth a subversion of the major scale perhaps??

Then again maybe we are just making stuff up??

But when you play through the scale think of the dominant tonic relationship and how you might go up to the 5 using steps of the major scale along the way and then how you might get back down. Once you have a pattern worked out then apply the same step patterns going down away from the tonic. You will now be targeting the sub dominant and you subverted the major scale

theory.

*inversion - when you have two (or more) notes one higher than the other(s). Then you take any one of those notes and move it one octave to the other side of the other note(s). That's an inversion.
Si
#84
Quote by 91RG350
theres....fancy words....? you mean like..... "modes"...?


Yeah......

It was mostly a joke pointed at the "hope to talk like am ace guitarist thread."
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
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