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Who Sh0t Ya HxO
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Join date: Apr 2008
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#1
So apparently I can't get lessons from Tom Hess because I can't do or understand what a barre chord is. That's understandable that he wants to work with people who already know the basics. I've been playing for 4 years though, I'm not really a beginner, and I've tried to teach myself chords... it's so confusing and I give up.

Anyone know if Tom Hess' lessons are worth it and how much do they cost?
Hail
i'm a mean bully
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#2
i wouldn't recommend him
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Xiaoxi
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#3
Tom Lulz

...modes and scales are still useless.


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DaddyTwoFoot
Barned
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#6
If you can't play chords, you're a beginner (even if it's after 4 years), sorry.
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So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
vampirelazarus
the one with four strings
Join date: Oct 2010
10 IQ
#7
Ive also heard that his lessons aren't worth it, as he's just a good salesman... or something...
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
505088K
Drekkenbrein
Join date: Nov 2008
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#8
If you can't play chords Tom Hess isn't going to help you either, or at least not more than any other teacher would.

He probably couldn't give better advice than most decent players on here. Because barre Chords are kinda a thing that you just learn and do. There aren't many ways to do them. You just find one way that doesn't hurt and sounds clean and that's it. "Masterclass" teachers like that Hess bloke are most about lead playing; stuff like vibrato bendings and picking articulations. It's just for rich people who can already play well to sound a tiny tiny bit better. Imho it's not worth the money, but you can see some of lesson clips of him on youtube for free and they do have some good advice. You won't see him talking about barre chords though, but any decent local teacher should be able to teach you how to do that. It's really not that hard...
Unreal T
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2006
220 IQ
#11
There are a million ways to do things on the guitar. That is why you have so many people with lessons spread all over the internet claiming their methods are best and beg for your money.

Best thing to do is to figure out things on your own especially when it comes to lead. There are so many ways you can be creative on guitar ...playing leads chords composing etc.

There is lots of free info on the internet and I would just use that and be creative yourself and not rely on someone. Tom Hess seems like he knows his stuff but I would never pay hundreds of dollars or whatever it is he charges. He has some pretty informative lessons for free on youtube...check them out because I think they are above what most guitar teachers spew out all over youtube. Great thing is that, his free lessons on youtube is all you really need to know from him lol.
TheHydra
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2011
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#12
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
I think I understand them... it's just a chord all on the same fret and u play it with one finger?


You know how open chords utilize the open strings? Well, with barre chords, your barring finger allows you to use the shape of an open chord while making the "open" strings fit the chord. You're essentially turning one of your fingers into a movable nut. I hope that makes sense.
AlanHB
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#15
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
If you can't play chords, you're a beginner (even if it's after 4 years), sorry.


Yep. Can't play chords, can't play songs. Its generally step number 1 for any guitarist to learn chords. I'll speculate and guess that TS knows some random riffs here and there that he learnt from tab, no full songs. That's definitely beginner territory.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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steven seagull
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Join date: Oct 2006
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#16
Your ability on the guitar isn't quantified by " the hardest/most impressive thing you'r eable to do", what matters is how good you are across the board. For example, if someone has focussed all their abilities on leanng to sweep up and down a few arpeggios and that's all they can do, but is unable to get to grips with a fundamental, basic concept like chords then the technical prowess is pretty much worthless.
They'll be able to do those few things they're good at but they won't really be able to "play the guitar", in the same way that you can teach a parrot to mimic all the words you like but it'll never really be able to hold a conversation with you.

So yes, you're still a beginner. Why? Because there's a lot of beginner stuff that you can't do, therefore need to learn.

Also didn't we already have a similar thread about this not long ago.
Actually called Mark!

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guitarherolol
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#19
Quote by Freepower
I would definitely recommend justinguitar.com over Tom Hess, and Justin's site is free.


+1
Hey there.
Who Sh0t Ya HxO
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2008
120 IQ
#20
I decided not to get Tom Hess' lessons.

Yeah I get that if I don't know beginner stuff like chords, that would still make me a beginner but to be honest you know... being self taught, it sucks... because in the beginning I didn't have a clue of what I was supposed to learn so I never learned anything, no one told me what to learn or what order to learn stuff in.

I made a thread a couple months ago asking for help on the subject of chords, how you use them in a song, when to use them and how to understand them, I read some of the content people posted, especially this one 12 part article called "The Crusade" that someone linked, but the two articles or so that had talked about chords weren't really a beginner's guide to chords and it didn't really help, also not knowing fret notes doesn't help me out either.

Also Justin guitar is still learning on my own, I'm done learning on my own, I need lessons for a person. No time though, which is why I'm looking for online lessons.

Can you get one on one lessons from Jam Play?
Last edited by Who Sh0t Ya HxO at Jul 19, 2012,
Hydra150
cutebutt mcsexyface
Join date: Nov 2006
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#21
So getting one on one (not online I mean) lessons is out of the question for you? Dont you live in a decent sized city?
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Who Sh0t Ya HxO
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2008
120 IQ
#22
I don't really have the transportation to get to a guitar teacher. I live a 3 minute bike ride away from a guitar center... you think they give decent lessons?

Hell.. the best buy next to it has a music section and I think they even offer guitar lessons... hmmm.

Oh and if you're all wondering...

The Tom Hess lessons range from 55-59 dollars depending on how often you pick to have them sent to you.


"To help you decide which option to choose, I recommend the following guideline:

If you can 'usually' practice 14 or more hours per week, then I recommend to take lessons once a week. (This means you will get a new lesson every week). 22% of my students choose this option.

If you can 'usually' practice 10-13 hours per week, then I recommend to take lessons once every 2 weeks. (This means you will get a new lesson once every two weeks.) 34% of my students choose this option.

If you can 'usually' practice 7-9 hours per week, then I recommend to take lessons once every 3 weeks. (This means you will get a new lesson once every three weeks.) 29% of my students choose this option.

If you can 'usually' practice less than 7 hours per week, then I recommend to take lessons once every 4 weeks. (This means you will get a new lesson once every four weeks.) 11% of my students choose this option.

If you can 'usually' practice less than 4 hours per week, then I recommend to take lessons once every 6 weeks. (This means you will get a new lesson once every 6 weeks.)
4% of my students choose this option."


Once a week $55.00
Once Every 2 weeks $55.00
Once Every 3 weeks $57.00
Once Every 4 weeks $58.00
Once Every 6 weeks $59.00
Last edited by Who Sh0t Ya HxO at Jul 19, 2012,
91RG350
At least Microsoft cared
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#23
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
I live a 3 minute bike ride away from a guitar center... you think they give decent lessons?


Personally, I would try that before giving money away on the interweb......
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Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
60 IQ
#24
if you have an old keyboard laying around (everybody seems to), you could always get piano lessons. the theoretical aspects will carry over to guitar without all the mucky muck a lot of guitar teachers throw at you (read: "if you want a cool scale, man, you should, like, learn modes")
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Hail killed MT

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vampirelazarus
the one with four strings
Join date: Oct 2010
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#25
That and Tom Hess seems a little weird... sending prerecorded lessons to people..... What about one on one? That is more important than.... what ever it is he teaches.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
wench38
Bahhh..
Join date: May 2011
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#26
The JustinGuitar lessons are much better for what you want and easy to follow. The whole Tom Hess thing is just awful for the most part.

I've tried the Jamplay trial and if you don't like Justin, you won't like them either.

Sounds like what you really want is a local teacher that can tell you what to adjust .
And being self-taught has nothing to do with being a beginner and not learning. Alot is self motivation and practice. There a several books and DVD's on how and what to learn and what order. Hal Leonard-- been around for decades and started many of us.

Barre chords.. comes down to practice. They've never been easy. Put down the T.V. Remote or xbox controller and spend some time EVERY day practicing them. You will improve at them.
Who Sh0t Ya HxO
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2008
120 IQ
#27
The problem with learning on my own, is that I don't know exactly what I should be learning. I need someone to tell what I don't know so that they can tell me what I need to learn.

For example, I don't understand chords. Sure you can explain to me the definition or tell me to go learn chords. Learning and memorizing chord shapes does not help me understand them, I know some but it doesn't help me. I want to know how they work in songs, when you use them, how do they help me in creating songs... I play metal genres most metal bands I know I don't see them pulling out an A chord or whatever.

As for the barre chords... forget them, I'm not taking Tom's lessons, therefore I can put that off until after I understands chords in general.
Last edited by Who Sh0t Ya HxO at Jul 19, 2012,
vampirelazarus
the one with four strings
Join date: Oct 2010
10 IQ
#28
So...

Go learn the notes on the fretboard, then lessen how to construct the major scale, then learn the intervals in making chords, then learn their functions in a given key.

Edit: I could tell you this stuff, but I'm on my phone and hate using it on forums for long posts.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
Last edited by vampirelazarus at Jul 19, 2012,
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
60 IQ
#29
e)----8-----
B)----8-----
G)----9-----
D)----10----
A)----10----
E)----8-----


just to get your feet wet:

this is a C major chord. if you wanted, you could even imagine it as a sweep arpeggio


e)---------------8h12(T)19p12p8--------------
B)-------------8----------------8-------------
G)------------9------------------9------------
D)----------10--------------------10----------
A)--------10------------------------10--------
E)----8h12-----------------------------12p8----


whether or not your at the sweeping level, you can see that they have basically the same notes. a lot of metal players don't even realize that the intricate sweep patterns they do are just within the confines of chord tones, and don't realize that by learning to make their own chords, they can make their own arpeggio voicings as well. i doubt you're sweeping if you can't perform barre chords, but honestly i was trying (and failing) to sweep long before i even knew what a barre chord was

now, how do you get the chords, and how do they interact?

C major has no sharps or flats, so the diatonic notes in the key of C major are:

C D E F G A B

within the chord, the voicing is C G C E G C

so, essentially, it's C E G.

now, if we number the notes in the key in order tonally:

R 2 3 4 5 6 7
C D E F G A B


C E G are the root, 3rd, and 5th in a major "triad", making a C major chord.

now, if you take that same key, and try to make, say, a D chord, your key signature has no sharps or flats, so you're stuck in that. typically theory doesn't have rules, but hypothetically speaking let's pretend you're forced to not use any accidentals here. you'd do the same thing as the C - add the 3rd and 5th note in the series if the D was the root.

D F A will spell out the chord. now, if you play that on your guitar, it'd be


e)----10-----
B)----10-----
G)----10-----
D)----12-----
A)----12-----
E)----10-----


that's not a major chord! a D major chord has an F# instead of an F, but because we can't use sharps or flats here, the 3rd is flattened.

now, i could do this and spell out triads all over the neck for you in C major, but you know the basic shapes you'll get and what to look for. you don't have to play these barre chords yet, but understand what they mean and be able to spell them out.

these are only triads - the most basic of chords, other than dyads (like power chords and double stops) - but once you understand the difference between major and minor chords and their role within each major and minor key, you have the resources at your disposal to figure out 7th chords and beyond.
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

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I want to be Hail when I grow up.
Sean0913
Music Theory Life-Hacker
Join date: Dec 2009
150 IQ
#30
If you send me your email, I'd be happy to shoot you over a course catalog. Also, I mentor people for free, and maybe I can help get you "unstuck". Because the very things that you are asking, makes me think we might be able to help!

Best,

Sean

Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
The problem with learning on my own, is that I don't know exactly what I should be learning. I need someone to tell what I don't know so that they can tell me what I need to learn.

For example, I don't understand chords. Sure you can explain to me the definition or tell me to go learn chords. Learning and memorizing chord shapes does not help me understand them, I know some but it doesn't help me. I want to know how they work in songs, when you use them, how do they help me in creating songs... I play metal genres most metal bands I know I don't see them pulling out an A chord or whatever.

As for the barre chords... forget them, I'm not taking Tom's lessons, therefore I can put that off until after I understands chords in general.
Who Sh0t Ya HxO
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2008
120 IQ
#31
Quote by Hail
e)----8-----
B)----8-----
G)----9-----
D)----10----
A)----10----
E)----8-----


just to get your feet wet:

this is a C major chord. if you wanted, you could even imagine it as a sweep arpeggio


e)---------------8h12(T)19p12p8--------------
B)-------------8----------------8-------------
G)------------9------------------9------------
D)----------10--------------------10----------
A)--------10------------------------10--------
E)----8h12-----------------------------12p8----


whether or not your at the sweeping level, you can see that they have basically the same notes. a lot of metal players don't even realize that the intricate sweep patterns they do are just within the confines of chord tones, and don't realize that by learning to make their own chords, they can make their own arpeggio voicings as well. i doubt you're sweeping if you can't perform barre chords, but honestly i was trying (and failing) to sweep long before i even knew what a barre chord was

now, how do you get the chords, and how do they interact?

C major has no sharps or flats, so the diatonic notes in the key of C major are:

C D E F G A B

within the chord, the voicing is C G C E G C

so, essentially, it's C E G.

now, if we number the notes in the key in order tonally:

R 2 3 4 5 6 7
C D E F G A B


C E G are the root, 3rd, and 5th in a major "triad", making a C major chord.

now, if you take that same key, and try to make, say, a D chord, your key signature has no sharps or flats, so you're stuck in that. typically theory doesn't have rules, but hypothetically speaking let's pretend you're forced to not use any accidentals here. you'd do the same thing as the C - add the 3rd and 5th note in the series if the D was the root.

D F A will spell out the chord. now, if you play that on your guitar, it'd be


e)----10-----
B)----10-----
G)----10-----
D)----12-----
A)----12-----
E)----10-----


that's not a major chord! a D major chord has an F# instead of an F, but because we can't use sharps or flats here, the 3rd is flattened.

now, i could do this and spell out triads all over the neck for you in C major, but you know the basic shapes you'll get and what to look for. you don't have to play these barre chords yet, but understand what they mean and be able to spell them out.

these are only triads - the most basic of chords, other than dyads (like power chords and double stops) - but once you understand the difference between major and minor chords and their role within each major and minor key, you have the resources at your disposal to figure out 7th chords and beyond.


All this chord talk is like math to me... so confusing. I don't know what triads are, or what diatonic is, or what a voicing is. Thanks for trying to help though...

I'm going to need something more remedial and simple.
Last edited by Who Sh0t Ya HxO at Jul 20, 2012,
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
30 IQ
#32
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
All this chord talk is like math to me...
That's exactly what music is, applied mathematics. And BTW, not very difficult math. In most cases, simple addition and subtraction.

You need to learn the most basic level of music theory. How to form a major scale, how to extract and form the chords created by it.

If you don't have that down, most everything will sound incomprehensible to you.

And IMO, you're really not at a level where you should start investing big buck into an online course. Basic theory, with a bit of resolve, you should almost be able to teach yourself. There is a point where everything simply falls into place. Why notes are sharps or flats, why certain groups of chords are associated with a certain key, and on....Why everything depends on a working understanding of the "chromatic scale"..

I don't fully have the drift of this thread down, but it seems you want to run before you can walk.

Basic theory might even be easier to learn if you have access to a piano. A keyboard is a very graphic representation of the relationship between notes. The fret board is far more abstract.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jul 20, 2012,
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
60 IQ
#33
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
All this chord talk is like math to me... so confusing. I don't know what triads are, or what diatonic is, or what a voicing is. Thanks for trying to help though...

I'm going to need something more remedial and simple.


i wasn't sure how much you understood, so the better way is to have you ask than make it even longer

a triad is just a grouping of 3 notes in a chord. like i said, a power chord is a dyad - 2 notes, the root and the fifth. a triad is essentially the same thing - the root, third, and fifth, typically.

diatonic just means "within the key". in C major, that means no sharps or flats, so i was trying to show you how to build triads within that scale - C major, D minor, E minor, &c.

a voicing is just, well, where the note is on the fretboard, what octave it's in, whatever. playing an A on the 5th note of the E string is a different voicing from playing it on the 0th fret of the A string.

i'd go to musictheory.net and start on lessons. i thought you knew a little more than you did, but it's hard to judge without that person-to-person thing. start from scratch on there and work on memorizing notes on the fretboard, and, most importantly, go at your own pace. don't rush anything or you'll have to go back and relearn it later.
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
wench38
Bahhh..
Join date: May 2011
10 IQ
#34
Extreme basics...
Learn your notes on your fretboard. Start with the lowest strings E and A first and work from there. http://www.justinguitar.com/en/TB-007-NotesOnNeck.php

Learn your musical alphabet A, a#,B,C,c#,D,d#,E,F,f#,G . = From A to A# is a half step, C-D is a whole step etc etc. Half step is 1 fret, a whole step is 2 frets

Then learn your intervals ,
After than learn Scale construction ( C major scale is easiest at first)
CDEFGABC = WWHWWWH step formula

Then Chords are formed from there.
Musictheory.net as mentioned above is a good place. There are also a ton of youtube vids and sites around. Just google for each part.
This stuff is actually very easy and no expensive lessons are really needed for it. Just takes a bit of time to practice and look at.
Last edited by wench38 at Jul 20, 2012,
Sean0913
Music Theory Life-Hacker
Join date: Dec 2009
150 IQ
#35
Quote by Who Sh0t Ya HxO
All this chord talk is like math to me... so confusing. I don't know what triads are, or what diatonic is, or what a voicing is. Thanks for trying to help though...

I'm going to need something more remedial and simple.


I didn't see a PM from you, so I'm guessing you've gotten things sorted and are OK now! Good luck with that

Best,

Sean
Who Sh0t Ya HxO
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2008
120 IQ
#36
Quote by Hail
i thought you knew a little more than you did, but it's hard to judge without that person-to-person thing. start from scratch on there and work on memorizing notes on the fretboard, and, most importantly, go at your own pace. don't rush anything or you'll have to go back and relearn it later.


Been playing for 4 years and I don't have knowledge about anything really. But through out my time I have noticed the intervals I think they're called, on the fret board. For example if I start on the 7th fret on the A string and I just go up the fret board W H W W H W W W H W

it sounds naturally good and that it seems that those sounds go together for the key of E.

I realized that this was a pattern on all the strings, but I had no idea what it was, I have the pattern memorized on any string. I just have to play the first note in order to know how the rest of the pattern goes on the string. I don't why, but I thought I would say that, that is what I picked up on my own in the years I've played, even though it's nothing special to learn. Other than that I'm a noob.


EDIT: Didn't see this post

Quote by wench38


Then learn your intervals ,
After than learn Scale construction ( C major scale is easiest at first)
CDEFGABC = WWHWWWH step formula
.


So what I picked up on my own, was scale construction?
Last edited by Who Sh0t Ya HxO at Jul 20, 2012,
vampirelazarus
the one with four strings
Join date: Oct 2010
10 IQ
#37
Seventh fret of the A string buddy. Seventh fret is E.

But yeah, you found it by ear, and that's pretty ****ing sweet.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
Who Sh0t Ya HxO
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2008
120 IQ
#38
Quote by vampirelazarus
Seventh fret of the A string buddy. Seventh fret is E.

But yeah, you found it by ear, and that's pretty ****ing sweet.


Ahh yes... I meant 7th.
Spaztikko
*
Join date: Apr 2011
90 IQ
#39
Holy shit there is no way in hell I'd pay someone 50 bucks for a lesson each week which is pre-recorded.

I pay 100 NZ for literally an entire year's half an hour once a week lessons.

dat shit cray.
Vlasco
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2007
10 IQ
#40
Quote by Spaztikko

I pay 100 NZ for literally an entire year's half an hour once a week lessons.



Whaaaaaa????


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