#1
So, I'm hoping this goes bit deeper than traditional music theory talk, and is somewhat original / interesting. But maybe I'm stating obvious that musicians come to realize at some point.

Anyway, my thought is this:

The drive to create music is to create order out of chaos. The sounds we want to control and use for this will be those chaotic noises that surrounded us in our formative years.

So, you can imagine the Industrial Revolution came along and suddenly there were entirely new sounds all around people -- machinery, steel, cars, electricity. Kids heard these noises growing up as just background noise, part of life. When those kids (or some of them) became musicians, they had a hunger to create a musical form of that noise, which required creating new instrumentation that echoed the sounds of machinery, metal, electricity, etc.

Basically, the sounds that surround you when you grow up become your "palette" for music. Kids growing up surrounded by traffic, factories, metal, machines, etc., could appreciate those sounds being harnessed and used to make music. However, older folks who grew up before those things were commonplace, have a different palette, based on the sounds that surrounded them when they grew up.

As we got into the late 20th century, there was a lot of beeping, electronic type sounds and electronica music was born.

By the same reasoning, you can look at people living in very close quarters in poor neighborhoods in tiny apartments with thin walls (ghetto, etc.) where you are always hearing people talking, yelling, fighting, screaming, crying, and you have an innate desire to turn that into musicality. And so rap is born.

Or you could go back thousand of years and imagine some tribal people living near a waterfall, hearing the plunging water, and the youth from that tribe try to create sounds that mimic the deep, ponderous plunging and gurgling sounds.

So there is city music, river music, ocean music, country music, etc.

I don't know much about country music, but I'm thinking that farmland with herd animals has particular noises -- bleating / mooing / etc. -- twang of animal voices in one place, that is harnessed in the instrumentation.

I guess I'm looking at this as sort of the "psychology" of music, or something along those lines. I think it intrigues me because (1) what are the new sounds do we think of as disruptive noises from modernization that will be turned into musical inspiriation by youth? (2) it helps generate understanding for different musical tastes / sensibilities apart from some attitude that "my music is better than your music."

At the very least, it may answer the age old question, why don't old people like good new music? Because they have a different musical palette.


Ken Myers
#2
you looking to deep into it

your right it is defiantly to do with environment , but musical environment not the sounds of factories and cars , I grew up in a city and music was a refreshing break from city noise

rap was born because the people in the ghettos couldn't afford instruments or tuition , also its rhythmic based music (lyrics provide rhythm instead of melody) which has evolved from traditional african music which is very rhythmic orientated
#3
not very well known, da vinci and braums actually created electronic music under king james I prior to any instruments being created
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#5
Quote by krm27
......particular noises -- bleating / mooing / etc.....

Come and visit my in-laws at Xmas... your theory will go out the window...

You make a good point though.... humans as a species have some sort of built in need to make sense of the world around us through different forms of expression and communication...music, painting, writing...etc

....its borne out of that drive to make our emotions, perceptions, and experiences understood by others.... we are a particularly communal species.... with the weird twist that we have the unique ability to deliberatley cause pain to ourselves and others.... "what a piece of work is man"... thats from some poem or something...its very good.... Picard said it to Q in some episode of Star Trek, from memory....
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#6
Quote by krm27


The drive to create music is to create order out of chaos. The sounds we want to control and use for this will be those chaotic noises that surrounded us in our formative years.

So, you can imagine the Industrial Revolution came along and suddenly there were entirely new sounds all around people -- machinery, steel, cars, electricity. Kids heard these noises growing up as just background noise, part of life. When those kids (or some of them) became musicians, they had a hunger to create a musical form of that noise, which required creating new instrumentation that echoed the sounds of machinery, metal, electricity, etc.

Basically, the sounds that surround you when you grow up become your "palette" for music. Kids growing up surrounded by traffic, factories, metal, machines, etc., could appreciate those sounds being harnessed and used to make music. However, older folks who grew up before those things were commonplace, have a different palette, based on the sounds that surrounded them when they grew up.

As we got into the late 20th century, there was a lot of beeping, electronic type sounds and electronica music was born.

By the same reasoning, you can look at people living in very close quarters in poor neighborhoods in tiny apartments with thin walls (ghetto, etc.) where you are always hearing people talking, yelling, fighting, screaming, crying, and you have an innate desire to turn that into musicality. And so rap is born.

Or you could go back thousand of years and imagine some tribal people living near a waterfall, hearing the plunging water, and the youth from that tribe try to create sounds that mimic the deep, ponderous plunging and gurgling sounds.

So there is city music, river music, ocean music, country music, etc.

I don't know much about country music, but I'm thinking that farmland with herd animals has particular noises -- bleating / mooing / etc. -- twang of animal voices in one place, that is harnessed in the instrumentation.

I guess I'm looking at this as sort of the "psychology" of music, or something along those lines. I think it intrigues me because (1) what are the new sounds do we think of as disruptive noises from modernization that will be turned into musical inspiriation by youth? (2) it helps generate understanding for different musical tastes / sensibilities apart from some attitude that "my music is better than your music."

At the very least, it may answer the age old question, why don't old people like good new music? Because they have a different musical palette.


Ken Myers


You do understand that

"why don't old people like good new music? Because they have a different musical palette."

Isn't really dependent on your above statement?

You could replace this with anything and infer the same conclusion.