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#41
Quote by WhiskeyFace
How does he have any idea at all where he's going to land?

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#42
Quote by Arby911
Not sure if serious and stupid or trolling?


Please elaborate how I would be stupid in this case, because I am dead serious on what I said. I ran with what I typed without looking at the numbers, this information would be valid if Baumgartner was attempting to dive from the Mesosphere or Thermosphere; however seeing as he is only going to 23 miles he will just be on the cusp of the Stratosphere as the Mesosphere doesn't start until roughly 30 miles. The risk of heat will not be as great but the risk of pressure issues will certainly still great, read how Kittinger's hand ending up swelling to twice the size from a pressure leak.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Kittinger
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Excelsior
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_diving
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Baumgartner

I don't lie, troll or try and fabricate stuff, in fact I do the opposite and try to make sure people get the truth and facts.

Quote by Todd Hart
0.o

Almost all skydivers pull their chutes at terminal velocity.


Yeah terminal velocity was the wrong term to use there, as in a sense yes all skydivers do hit a terminal velocity, but the way they jump actually limits that velocity. On average the velocity would be approximately 120MPH, this is your standard belly first face down dive. Diving head first would decrease your drag allowing you to pickup considerably more speed in fact Kittinger and Baumgartner both hit the same speed of 614MPH so I am guessing that is top speed when diving head first. Which I can only assume if your going three times as fast odds are the force when you open your chute will be three times greater, but that's a bad way to put it as they probably have and axillary chute or something that slows them down I cant really say jumped from 19 miles before!
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#43
Quote by WCPhils
lrn to terminal velocity


I wasn't serious.

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Quote by strait jacket
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#44
Quote by ErikLensherr
If he attached magnets to his jumpsuit and embedded the ground around the landing zone with magnets of the opposite polarity, he wouldn't need a parachute.


Quote by whoomit
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#45
Quote by ne14t
Please elaborate how I would be stupid in this case, because I am dead serious on what I said. I ran with what I typed without looking at the numbers, this information would be valid if Baumgartner was attempting to dive from the Mesosphere or Thermosphere; however seeing as he is only going to 23 miles he will just be on the cusp of the Stratosphere as the Mesosphere doesn't start until roughly 30 miles. The risk of heat will not be as great but the risk of pressure issues will certainly still great, read how Kittinger's hand ending up swelling to twice the size from a pressure leak.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Kittinger
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Excelsior
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_diving
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felix_Baumgartner

I don't lie, troll or try and fabricate stuff, in fact I do the opposite and try to make sure people get the truth and facts.


Yeah terminal velocity was the wrong term to use there, as in a sense yes all skydivers do hit a terminal velocity, but the way they jump actually limits that velocity. On average the velocity would be approximately 120MPH, this is your standard belly first face down dive. Diving head first would decrease your drag allowing you to pickup considerably more speed in fact Kittinger and Baumgartner both hit the same speed of 614MPH so I am guessing that is top speed when diving head first. Which I can only assume if your going three times as fast odds are the force when you open your chute will be three times greater, but that's a bad way to put it as they probably have and axillary chute or something that slows them down I cant really say jumped from 19 miles before!


There is NO risk of heat, he won't be going fast enough. There is no pressure risk unless he has an equipment failure, so I'm not sure what your point was there? He won't be opening his, or any, chute at 600+mph. He will hit his maximum speed in the first 30 seconds or so of the jump, and decelerate due to increased atmosphere from that point on, and open his chute at or around the velocity of a normal skydive.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
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