anameofsomesort
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2006
364 IQ
#1
Hey guys.

I have started uni and really wanna join the big band but have no experience in reading music, so went down to the rehearsal and got my ass kicked trying to play along with bass tablature and ended up just following chord symbols! Does anyone know any good resources for learning how to read, maybe somewhere you can get the sheets and then play along to the music? thanks!
Last edited by anameofsomesort at Oct 4, 2012,
Metalloy
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2010
1,249 IQ
#2
Quote by anameofsomesort
Hey guys.

I have started uni and really wanna join the big band but have no experience in reading music, so went down to the rehearsal and got my ass kicked trying to play along with bass tablature and ended up just following chord symbols! Does anyone know any good resources for learning how to read, maybe somewhere you can get the sheets and then play along to the music? thanks!

music tablature or music notation? i think you mean notation, and i dont know a website for it, but this is not a day or two kind of thing, it takes a lot of time.
Good luck.
jeleopard
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Join date: Apr 2011
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#4
Good Boys Do Fine Always.
(GBDFA) are the lines of the bass clef.
FACE are the spaces of the bass clef.

I find that reading a note and then translating what fret to push down is the harder part.
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derek8520
Registered User
Join date: May 2012
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#5
Quote by jeleopard

FACE are the spaces of the bass clef.



ACEG are the spaces of the bass clef.
Metalloy
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2010
1,249 IQ
#7
Quote by jeleopard
Good Boys Do Fine Always.
(GBDFA) are the lines of the bass clef.
FACE are the spaces of the bass clef.

I find that reading a note and then translating what fret to push down is the harder part.

but isnt that a particular case of a certain key? maybe the most commonly used but not always the case.
Tostitos
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Join date: Jan 2009
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#8
Quote by Metalloy
but isnt that a particular case of a certain key? maybe the most commonly used but not always the case.

Notes don't change their positions on a staff. The key signature denotes the key, and accidentals are there to raise or lower individual notes, but the notes themselves don't change places in a given clef.

Its not like tabs where the note positions can change with different tunings. Think of the keys on a piano, middle C is always middle C. You can play in whatever key you want, but the keys on the keyboard don't change around.
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jeleopard
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Join date: Apr 2011
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#9
Quote by derek8520
ACEG are the spaces of the bass clef.



jabfklsjg;kjrg;elrg.

I'm a sax player at heart.



But yes, ACEG.

Sorry about that.
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Metalloy
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2010
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#10
Quote by Tostitos
Notes don't change their positions on a staff. The key signature denotes the key, and accidentals are there to raise or lower individual notes, but the notes themselves don't change places in a given clef.

Its not like tabs where the note positions can change with different tunings. Think of the keys on a piano, middle C is always middle C. You can play in whatever key you want, but the keys on the keyboard don't change around.

Yea I meant Clef XD I translated it from french, my bad XD
Sudaka
Novice Bass Player
Join date: Sep 2008
1,096 IQ
#11
As previously stated, it's not a two or three day thing. If you want to read from sight (playing something written on a pentagram without having practived it before) you've got a long, long way to go. If you just want to understand what is written on a pentagram, that isn't complicated, but at first you'll something like need 10 seconds per note to know where to fret (may sound exaggerated, but when you start learning, it's like that). I've found that you start working rythm with a whole different perspective when you start reading music, so i highly recommend it. Oh, and this process will be slower if you don't know the fretboard by memory. It'll help if that's the case, though.
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Last edited by Sudaka at Oct 5, 2012,
anarkee
oh the horror!
Join date: Aug 2006
3,136 IQ
#12
Get ahold of Hal Leonards bass method. They actually don't even mention tabs until late in the game and force you to, in very easily digestible lessons to learn Bass Clef and standard notation.

Like anything else, it's a matter of practice.
King Of Suede
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Join date: Mar 2007
873 IQ
#13
I recommend just getting a beginner bass methods book. Work through that, then pick up a simandl book. It's a technique book for upright bass, but it has a lot of scalar exercises that reinforce reading note in different ways. (unless someone knows a better book for this)
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sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
anarkee
oh the horror!
Join date: Aug 2006
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#14
If you've never read standard notation, I'd think a Simandl book would be like handing someone War and Peace when they're really just ready for "The Cat in the Hat".

Simandl is the torture all of us upright players put ourselves through because we have to.
King Of Suede
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Join date: Mar 2007
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#15
Quote by anarkee
If you've never read standard notation, I'd think a Simandl book would be like handing someone War and Peace when they're really just ready for "The Cat in the Hat".

Simandl is the torture all of us upright players put ourselves through because we have to.

I suggested the beginner method book first because they at least go through notes up to around middle C. I like the Simandl because it shows enharmonic ways of reading things.
Meh. I was beat tired when I made that post anyways.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
Robbgnarly
Tab Contributor
Join date: Feb 2011
1,177 IQ
#16
I learned low to read notation when I was in 7th grade, because I took band. It deff takes some time to get up to par on reading the note and playing it at the same time. But it is super handy to know.
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