#1
Like, if they hear a song, they can instantly hear what everything is in the song - chord progression, base, melody, counterpoint (if any) etc. Outside of key, of course.
I would imagine with good practice an hour a day of whatever regimen, it could take about 5 years. I might be completely off, but i want to hear some of your guys' opinions on this.
#4
I've noticed its cumulative over time. I know at the 5 year mark I could pick apart most radio tunes and I practiced 2-3 hours a day, every day. That being said I started off incredibly tone deaf and I have trouble believing it gets any worse than where I started so I'm sure most people wouldn't require that much practice.
#5
I started getting into music theory like 2 years ago. I've practiced very little actual ear training and I'd say I'm about halfway there, so 5 years sounds about right. In my case anyway.
#6
It also depends on what songs you plan on listening too. The radio stuff won't take you very long to figure out. But some modern classical music and avante garde stuff would be nearly impossible to interpret.
#7
Quote by killerkev321
But some modern classical music and avante garde stuff would be nearly impossible to interpret.


That kind of surrealist stuff is hardly 'music'.
#8
But it does depend. Simple diatonic stuff is pretty easy, major and minor chords are pretty easy. Inversions, chromatic notes, peculiar extensions ... those things are a lot harder.

And obviously the speed with which something is played makes a difference, and the context in which you hear it (distortion, loud drums, weird harmonies from other instruments).

Ultimately I have no idea. I feel like I've made tremendous progress with my ear in the last two years, but I also feel like I have a long way to go to really be able to hear all of that stuff accurately at speed.

I suspect it's like a lot of things - you're always aware of the stuff that's just beyond your reach, and there's always another rung onthe ladder.
#9
Yeah I think 5 years is pretty fair if you put in the work.

That said, it's a lifelong process, so it's hard to come up with a definitive time when you "have it figured out." There's always more that your ear can pick up on. You might be able to pick out basic chord progressions after a couple years, maybe a basic simple diatonic melodies just after that, but to really hear complex changes and melodies with larger/chromatic intervals, that could take many years of training.

This is all based on my experience though. It could take much longer for some people, and it could take as little as 5 years for someone to have a ridiculous aural mastery of melody, harmony and counterpoint to the extent that they could hear almost any piece of music and notate it perfectly simply by ear. I imagine this is the huge outlier though.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Also, of course, age makes a huge difference.

It's much faster to learn almost anything related to language (and music is a language) when you're younger. In fact, a lot of kids won't have to do the training work we adults have to do - they'll pick it up just from exposure.
#12
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
One day I should check that out to see if it's actually any good.



You are on fire today, mate. I swear.

Edit: ...and ditto.
Last edited by mdc at Oct 6, 2012,
#14
you'll be a better musician if you spend that time doing speed exercises on all the modes
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.
#15
Quote by Hail
you'll be a better musician if you spend that time doing speed exercises on all the modes


#16
Sure why not. In the meantime get off the computer and back to the guitar if you want to improve.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#17
Quote by AlanHB
Sure why not. In the meantime get off the computer and back to the guitar if you want to improve.


lol. Yea i've been making a lot of threads recently. I'll just get out of here for a while
#18
Quote by Jacques-Henri
That kind of surrealist stuff is hardly 'music'.




start making witch house and microtonal music in your bedroom to spite this misguided misguy macash

sell your guitar and amp and get ableton/FL, an sm58, and a pawn-shop keyboard for midi and put your dreams out on your sleeve
Quote by Kevätuhri
Hail isn't too edgy for posts, posts are not edgy enough for Hail.
#19
Quote by Hail


start making witch house and microtonal music in your bedroom to spite this misguided misguy macash

sell your guitar and amp and get ableton/FL, an sm58, and a pawn-shop keyboard for midi and put your dreams out on your sleeve


I'm on it
#20
They say you're not a master of something until you do it for 10,000 hours.
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#21
Never. By definition, the "average" musician will never have the "perfect" ear.
Quote by AlanHB
It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#22
There is no such thing as the 'perfect' ear, there will always be things that you can work on. If you think you don't then you're not thinking hard enough.