kauna
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2012
478 IQ
#1
Recently i started jamming and improvising basic pentatonic and natural minor scales over slow and groovy backing tracks.The problem is that whenever i play slow and add vibrato and slides and stuff like that,it always sounds like farts and doesn't sound good.How do i improve that?
Kevin Saale
Talks to empty chairs
Join date: Dec 2007
1,339 IQ
#2
Practice. Good vibrato is one of those things that separates the good from the great. It helps to be in time when you use vibrato.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
Facecut
Vorsitzender
Join date: May 2007
322 IQ
#3
Watch instructional videos about vibrato and bending to make sure you are using proper mechanics. Common problem is posture. The classical posture is badly suited in many cases because key point is the knuckle of your index finger having contact with the neck in order to be used as a pivot point. Your thumb needs to be above the neck while bending and vibrating upwards on the high strings. Then copy players with good phrasing and vibrato as close as you can. Determine and become aware of problems and difficulties and work on them specificly like any other technique. Once you have done that for some time it will start to show up in your improvising. Refine it over the years.
Last edited by Facecut at Oct 11, 2012,
vayne92
UG's Fedora Enthusiast
Join date: Jan 2011
2,974 IQ
#4
Vibrato in my opinion is one of the hardest if not the single hardest technique to perfect. Your vibrato will improve your entire life. And i definitely agree that good vibrato separates the good from the great.
I have mad respect for someone with good vibrato. Vibrato is much more impressive to me for instance than 1000bpm 8string sweep arpeggios.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eXMJnltcTzQ&feature=plcp

This Swedish bastard has some disgustingly good vibrato. I can think of very very few musicians in the world with vibrato like that.
Last edited by vayne92 at Oct 11, 2012,
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#5
Quote by vayne92
Your vibrato will improve your entire life.

Great! Made laugh.

TS, the fingers don't move, it's an illusion. Rotation comes from the wrist, and the movement is like turning a key. The whole hand moves as one entity.

Practice the motion without the guitar, then simply bring your hand to the guitar and do the exact same thing.

Do it slowly, like a series of mini downward bends.
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#7
Once again, this guy pwns all. Right at the end of the improvisation.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IwWc_Wyl5HA

And around 2:15 here... mind you I'm on fresh gauge 11's so it's a bit tough! 9's or 10's would be ok.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXD8Pf2R-tQ
chuck knuckles
Your mother's favorite
Join date: Oct 2012
23 IQ
#8
it helps me with slow playing to spend more time visualizing what im gonna play, and trying more to sing with the thing then just make notes or get from A to B. try to play nice pretty melodies into parts, and use those techniques to vocalize the sound rather than just to transition notes. and listen to the blues guys. the old blues guys wailed. BB King is one of the vibrato masters. Beesting vibrato
llBlackenedll
Serial Thread Hijacker
Join date: Apr 2011
699 IQ
#9
A few months ago my vibrato was absolutely shocking. Now I'm quite happy with it and it's constantly improving. I've found the best way to improve vibrato technique and timing is to shove on a metronome, and go through all 4 fingers on all 6 strings (one at a time, of course!) doing semitone vibrato and whole tone vibrato. When I do it, I do it in quarters, then dotted 8ths, then 8ths. Don't push the metronome or anything - the whole point is to make sure you're just vibratoing in time. When I first started doing it, I'd do it on the 12th fret, but as your technique improves/you develop the requires muscle(s) to do it, you can move it down a few frets.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Oct 12, 2012,
JoeyHoser
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
21 IQ
#10
I'm just starting to work on my vibrato and I'm wondering just how necessary it is to use your wrist instead of your fingers to do the work. I'm a little guy with little hands and I just for the life of me can't get the wrist action to feel natural or actually behave the way I want to. Does this just indicate a problem with technique(I may be holding the neck to tightly with my thumb, not sure), or is it possibly an actual symptom of just having smaller hands?

This problem has lead to try to learn to just use my fingers instead, but I'm wondering if I should rethink the whole thing.
llBlackenedll
Serial Thread Hijacker
Join date: Apr 2011
699 IQ
#11
Quote by JoeyHoser
I'm just starting to work on my vibrato and I'm wondering just how necessary it is to use your wrist instead of your fingers to do the work. I'm a little guy with little hands and I just for the life of me can't get the wrist action to feel natural or actually behave the way I want to. Does this just indicate a problem with technique(I may be holding the neck to tightly with my thumb, not sure), or is it possibly an actual symptom of just having smaller hands?

This problem has lead to try to learn to just use my fingers instead, but I'm wondering if I should rethink the whole thing.

It does feel incredibly unnatural at first (at least it did for me) but you get used to it in time. I assume you have your thumb over the neck when bending upwards, and not over the neck when bending downwards? You need to make sure you're pivoting on the side of your index finger. I (and I'm sure many others) find it quite a bit easier to bend downwards (without your thumb over the neck, but pivoting on the index finger) but you need to learn to do both as obviously you can't bend downwards on the high E and it's a bad idea to on the B.

You can bend and vibrato with just the strength of your fingers but I personally wouldn't recommend it (though it may be a bit easier in some situations if you can't wrap your thumb over the neck quickly enough). Apparently it's not good for your fingers to do this, and also I find that the guitar can shake around quite a bit if you're standing if you're bending upwards as the string can actually start to lift the guitar (depending on string gauge).
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)
Last edited by llBlackenedll at Oct 12, 2012,
JoeyHoser
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
21 IQ
#12
Quote by llBlackenedll
It does feel incredibly unnatural at first (at least it did for me) but you get used to it in time. I assume you have your thumb over the neck when bending upwards, and not over the neck when bending downwards? You need to make sure you're pivoting on the side of your index finger. I (and I'm sure many others) find it quite a bit easier to bend downwards (without your thumb over the neck, but pivoting on the index finger) but you need to learn to do both as obviously you can't bend downwards on the high E and it's a bad idea to on the B.


Hmmm... I'm not sure exactly what you mean by having my thumb "over" the neck. Regardless of using vibrato or not, my thumb generally stays pretty well planted on the back of the neck for stability(that's my thinking anyway). Perhaps this is an unrelated problem I need to address first?