#1
I just started my degree recently and we've been working on relative pitch. My lecturer mentioned perfect pitch, which in his word said "It is nigh on impossible to achieve perfect pitch" which is most probably true without a lot of practice. Anyway, I was doing my relative pitch exercises and I could get it slightly but when I tried a perfect pitch exercise I was getting a large majority of the answers right, I struggled a bit when the note changed octave but I got used to it.

I don't really get it, so am I between relative and perfect pitch or something?

Thanks
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#2
Can you identify a note just by hearing it, with no references whatsoever? If no, you don't have perfect pitch.

My understanding of perfect pitch is you are either born with it or you can learn it at a very young age... somehow.

But, even if adults could learn it, because it's so hard to do so, there's no point in trying when you could work on having amazing relative pitch.
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#3
It's almost like half and half. Some notes I can just hear and say the note, other times I relate them to a chord.
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



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#6
Quote by :-D
take it from someone with perfect pitch

work on your relative pitch and don't worry about attaching a label to it



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Last edited by British_Steal at Oct 12, 2012,
#7
Yeah, your test seems a little imperfect in that you'd still have a note from the previous answer in your memory. Perfect pitch would be somebody tinking a glass and you being able to identify that it's an A, or that somebody's phone vibrating on the table sounds an F#. Relative pitch is far more practical, and more easily developed. Work at it and enjoy reaping the rewards.
#8
Sometimes I recognize the absolute pitch of random things. For instance, if a sound happens to be the same pitch I associate with a particular part of a song, I'll be like "oh, that's the same note as that part in that song, and that note's a C or whatever." I don't think I'd do very well on command, though. So that's a thing that happens.
#9
What's absolute pitch? I actually haven't heard of it....or I have and haven't listened, cause what you have is very similar to how i recognize notes and chords.
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
#11
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Absolute pitch is another name for perfect pitch. And you probably don't have it. And you probably don't want it, it seems like it would be more annoying than anything else.


Yeah i heard people can't listen to AC/DC because there are a few bum notes in the recording. I just don't get how I can't get relative pitch but I can listen to notes or chords and know what they are.....confuzzled haha.
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
#12
To the best fitting thread I could find:

I recently realized I was humming MCA's bassline for the Beastie Boys' "Sabotage" in the correct key.

I picked up my bass to play the riff and - low and behold - they matched exactly.

I waited a day and did the same thing with "Spoonman", by Soundgarden and the same thing happened.

Hours later, I did the same thing with "Nightmare", by A7X.

I don't have a very good relative pitch, and I know next to no music theory, but would being able to play in key without external reference be considered "perfect pitch"?
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#13
you just have listened to those songs a lot...maybe too much, and memorized them...

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#14
Quote by sideslick
To the best fitting thread I could find:

I recently realized I was humming MCA's bassline for the Beastie Boys' "Sabotage" in the correct key.

I picked up my bass to play the riff and - low and behold - they matched exactly.

I waited a day and did the same thing with "Spoonman", by Soundgarden and the same thing happened.

Hours later, I did the same thing with "Nightmare", by A7X.

I don't have a very good relative pitch, and I know next to no music theory, but would being able to play in key without external reference be considered "perfect pitch"?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Levitin_effect
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#15
I'm not saying I have perfect pitch cause to be honest I wouldn't really want it. I do tend to remember the notes by songs, for example I would remember a D because it's the first note of With or Without You by U2. But then I know what a C#/Db would sound like because I know the flattened sound. Then if there is a melody or chord and I listen to the first note I think "Oh yeah, that's a C# because it sounds a half step lower than the first note of With or Without You" then I'm able to go from there and play the rest of the phrase. It's just how my mind processes it. I guess it similar to what Sideslick has mentioned, since I was able to do it when I was younger but now my theory has developed I can do it better than what I used too.
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
Last edited by Tokai09 at Oct 13, 2012,
#16
I think it was Alan that said in a similar thread some weeks ago that with perfect pitch you can differentiate and name the pitches like you can differentiate and name colours. To compare that with the post above, you don't usually recognize the colour green by thinking "that's a tad more yellow than blue, so it has to be green", do you?
#17
I know you see colours when you have perfect pitch, I don't see colours. Then again I'm slightly colour blind...sooo haha. But I don't see colours, it's like a lightbulb goes off in my mind haha.
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
#18
Quote by Tokai09
I know you see colours when you have perfect pitch, I don't see colours. Then again I'm slightly colour blind...sooo haha. But I don't see colours, it's like a lightbulb goes off in my mind haha.

That's something completely different.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synesthesia#Sound_.E2.86.92_color_synesthesia
#19
Quote by Tokai09
I'm not saying I have perfect pitch cause to be honest I wouldn't really want it. I do tend to remember the notes by songs, for example I would remember a D because it's the first note of With or Without You by U2. But then I know what a C#/Db would sound like because I know the flattened sound. Then if there is a melody or chord and I listen to the first note I think "Oh yeah, that's a C# because it sounds a half step lower than the first note of With or Without You" then I'm able to go from there and play the rest of the phrase. It's just how my mind processes it. I guess it similar to what Sideslick has mentioned, since I was able to do it when I was younger but now my theory has developed I can do it better than what I used too.

OK, this sounds like you remember the song in the right key and just compare the notes you hear to that song. That's not perfect pitch. You just remember the song in the correct key. And that sounds the same as what rockingamer2 posted:
Quote by rockingamer2


I think if you had perfect pitch, you could immediately tell that the note is C#. You wouldn't have to compare it to the key of a song. Whenever you heard a note, you would know what it was. So the color example was good. When you see something blue, you instantly can tell that it's blue and you don't have to compare it to other colors.
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#20
So in laymans terms, what is synesthesia?
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
#22
TS, just get relative pitch and if you want gain a tonal memory over a few notes. You will be able to do pretty much anything you want from there.
#24
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
It doesn't matter. It really and truly doesn't matter.


So the point in posting the link is?? haha

I looked at tonal memory. Anywhoo, I got a better understanding of it all now. Thanks guys!
Mark Tremonti: I have my own mixer on stage so I can alter my volmes while on stage

Myles Kennedy: And why's that Mark?

Mark Tremonti:....I have trust issues with the sound guy



Selling a Marshall DSL401!
#25
someone tried associating colors with pitches to help people learn perfect pitch. I used to want it pretty badly. sitting here with a interval trainer and color wheel.....nothings happening...lol

If I'm jamming to music sometimes if I listen and wait I guess the correct key of the song on my first attempt.

even ones with perfect pitch must train there relative pitch I guess they can just tell they are out of key easier..lol
#26
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