#1
Ok, so, I've been playing guitar for 6 years, I've had several people tell me I'm an incredible player, but I can only read tabs. I can't read sheet music. So can someone explain to me how it works? I can read it for orchestral instruments however.
#3
Quote by :-D
REALLY GAY OWL






that shit made my day.

i don't get it, TS. so you can read sheet music, but you can't read sheet music? the ability to read sheet music is the ability to read sheet music. if you can read it on one instrument, you can read it on another - you just need to achieve familiarity with the instrument. and since you've been playing for 6 years...

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#4
Quote by Brotherbrodude
Ok, so, I've been playing guitar for 6 years, I've had several people tell me I'm an incredible player, but I can only read tabs. I can't read sheet music. So can someone explain to me how it works? I can read it for orchestral instruments however.


Yes, it's possible to explain how sheet music works, but not in one post. Your best bet is to find a music theory website (I tend to use teoria.com, other people might give you other sites to look at) and start working through the basics. If you're really, really keen a guide such as Eric Taylor's AB Guide To Music Theory will give you a handy reference. Whatever you do though, don't just read the lessons and think you're done. Make sure you practice what you learn because otherwise you'll just have a bunch of theory in your head that's disconnected from the music you're playing.
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#5
Quote by Brotherbrodude
I can't read sheet music. So can someone explain to me how it works?

Uh huh...
I can read it for orchestral instruments however.

WAT?

Do you know the notes on the fretboard?
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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#6
Quote by Brotherbrodude
Ok, so, I've been playing guitar for 6 years, I've had several people tell me I'm an incredible player, but I can only read tabs. I can't read sheet music. So can someone explain to me how it works? I can read it for orchestral instruments however.

Can you tell where E or G is on the sheet? If you can, then you can read sheet music so what's the problem? It's the same for all instruments. So what do you mean with "I can read it for orchestral instruments however"? Do you know where E is on your fretboard? If not, I don't know how you can have been playing for six years without knowing it.
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#7
I can read it for Cello, Viola, and Violin. I just for some reason can't understand it for Guitar. It just doesn't piece together in my head correctly.
#8
Quote by Brotherbrodude
I can read it for Cello, Viola, and Violin. I just for some reason can't understand it for Guitar. It just doesn't piece together in my head correctly.



Guitar sheet music often utilizes the Treble Cleft. Cello uses a Bass cleft. Viola uses an Alto Cleft. Violin uses Treble cleft. Herein may lie your confusion?
#9
Quote by Simper-Yut
Viola uses an Alto Cleft.

Mostly. Sometimes, we get bits and pieces in treble, but you're right outside of that.


On topic, learn the notes of the fretboard. And then play the notes in treble clefs an octave lower. Then, ZING!, you can read guitar music.

If only it were that simple for me. I still have issues remembering some of the notes.
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#11
Quote by ibanez1511
This problem happens more with electric players.
I suggest you get into classical guitar. try and get your classical guitar playing on par with your electric. If you can do this you will find your sight reading will really improve.


Thanks man. I'll do that.