nasserliverpool
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2009
1,233 IQ
#1
Now I've been a blues player ever since I started playing guitar. Throughout the years, I've heard and listened to many jazz artists and at times wanted to explore the world of jazz. As soon as I start my efforts, I hit this wall of jargon and jazz terminology that just intimidates me in a musical sense. Its been a while since I heard a good jazz player until I stumbled upon this gem of a video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zufIbIu_IxA&feature=plcp

The improv he starts at 0:42 just blows me away. There are a few questions that stem from his playing. One is what kind of jazz that improv follows and if there are any guitarists who have the same style. The second would be what recommendations the wise people of these forums have for an aspiring guitarist looking to explore the world of jazz.
Last edited by nasserliverpool at Nov 11, 2012,
FierceLikeBear
Registered User
Join date: Nov 2012
10 IQ
#2
Looks and sounds like bebop or hard bop. That style is big on lots of chord changes and up tempos. Then again he may also be playing "hot jazz" or gypsy jazz look up Django Reinhardt (one of my favorites). It may be a mix of them all!

Now I'm just learning jazz right now as well but I have found that in jazz if it works and sounds good... it's good. So he very well could be playing modes over up-tempos and be-bop chords. I'm using [forbidden link] and doing the "Jazz University" lessons. It's good stuff. I'd recommend that as well as reading lesson books that work for you and if you can... find an instructor or someone that plays jazz and have them teach you. Best way to learn jazz is to listen to lots, learn all you can, and have some to help explain things to you.
amonamarthmetal
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2008
1,808 IQ
#3
I don't know much about jazz, but people always say listen. It wouldn't hurt to learn some jazz songs. I'm working on some Charlie Parker songs right now as they aren't to difficult but are really fun.
This site has licks and stuff. I Don't know if that will help, but it shows what chords the licks can be played over.
http://www.jazzguitar.be/
Gear:
Dean RC7X (Bareknuckle Coldsweat pickups)
Ibanez Rg2570Z (Bareknuckle Juggernaughts)
Schecter KM-6
Schecter Hellraiser Hybrid 7 String
Engl Powerball II
Orange PPC412
Line 6 Pod HD500X
mattrusso
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2012
615 IQ
#4
I would describe style in the video you posted as soul jazz or maybe jazz-funk to some degree. for the most part. Definitely not bop or gypsy jazz (although he did cop a lot of Django licks). If you're looking for stuff in a similar style, check out Soulive, John Scofield, and some funkier Grant Green tracks. There are a lot of guys who play in a similar style, so the possibilities are really endless. Also check out more than just guitar players! We wanna transcend the limitations of our instrument, not be bound by them! Right?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdGe0BsbEt8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5-9j2WPfnCo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLBTSrD42QY

The only real way to get into this stuff is to really WANT it. You have to want it enough to learn harmony and other musical concepts, and to practice ridiculous amounts. There's no "easy" way or shortcut. If you don't do this, you'll be playing a shitty imitation at best, because you won't have a clue what's going on musically.

Also, amonamarthmetal, if those Charlie Parker tunes are easy, you're probably playing them wrong.
Last edited by mattrusso at Nov 11, 2012,
a0kalittlema0n
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2004
798 IQ
#6
I have been thinking the same thing as the TS forever. My only question is is there any type of progression in learning jazz? I keep hearing "learn millions of chord extensions." I see and have learned a bit about substitution of chords and how millions of possibilities are out there.

My next thing is learning standards. Where the heck to i begin doing this. There are like 5 billion jazz standards, and I don't understand all the jargon that comes with it. I dont understand have 400 people can play one song and have it all be different.

I have also looked up jazz rhythm to help me learn more, but the rhythm seems to be generally simple (compared to the theory of jazz chords)

I also don't understand if I'm supposed to make my own crazy progressions from a ii V I and make my own melodies? or am I supposed to play mostly other jazz pieces (or standards)?
CryogenicHusk
wannabe guitarist
Join date: Apr 2012
1,005 IQ
#7
Quote by a0kalittlema0n
I have been thinking the same thing as the TS forever. My only question is is there any type of progression in learning jazz? I keep hearing "learn millions of chord extensions." I see and have learned a bit about substitution of chords and how millions of possibilities are out there.

My next thing is learning standards. Where the heck to i begin doing this. There are like 5 billion jazz standards, and I don't understand all the jargon that comes with it. I dont understand have 400 people can play one song and have it all be different.

I have also looked up jazz rhythm to help me learn more, but the rhythm seems to be generally simple (compared to the theory of jazz chords)

I also don't understand if I'm supposed to make my own crazy progressions from a ii V I and make my own melodies? or am I supposed to play mostly other jazz pieces (or standards)?


The millions of chord extensions part is basically mastering chord construction so that you barely have to think about it. This comes with time and practice I'd say.

For the standards I'd suggest getting "The Real Book." Then just look at it and look up the ones that catch your attention on youtube and learn them (both melody and chords).

I dunno what to tell you about rhythm. I, myself, am trying to learn as much about it as possible (in general, you know what I mean. Developed an interest in funk and once I get that down, I want to move apply the rhythm techniques to jazz and rock),

And for making your own crazy progressions: if you wanna write your own songs, why not? I'd start playing other jazz pieces and listen to as much of it as possible for a while first, though.
MikeDodge
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2009
349 IQ
#9
Quote by nasserliverpool
Now I've been a blues player ever since I started playing guitar. Throughout the years, I've heard and listened to many jazz artists and at times wanted to explore the world of jazz. As soon as I start my efforts, I hit this wall of jargon and jazz terminology that just intimidates me in a musical sense. Its been a while since I heard a good jazz player until I stumbled upon this gem of a video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zufIbIu_IxA&feature=plcp

The improv he starts at 0:42 just blows me away. There are a few questions that stem from his playing. One is what kind of jazz that improv follows and if there are any guitarists who have the same style. The second would be what recommendations the wise people of these forums have for an aspiring guitarist looking to explore the world of jazz.



I don't have my guitar so this is by ear...

That's just a jazzed up snippet of the 70's pop tune Just the Two Us (I believe that's the tune). I believe this is his progression, but I know it's full of 2-5 type moves:

||: C#m7b7 F#7#9 | Bm7 Bbm7 Am7 D9 | C#m7b7 F#7#9 | Bm7 | C#m7b7 F#7#9 | Bm7 / Am7 D9 | Gmaj7 | F#7#5 :||

That F#7#9 looks weird in text but it's just the Hendrix chord, so a F#7 chord with a #9 added. Similarly, the last chord is a F#7 chord with a #5 in it.

The minor 2-5-1 is found in an endless amount of jazz tunes, Black Orpeus, Autumn Leaves, Tune Up, etc all contain them either as the Tonic turn around, being modulated to, etc...

I have a tutorial on navigating the minor 2-5-1 you'd probably find useful. It's based on the tune Softly As In A Morning Sunrise. It's not an end all lesson but it should sure open you ears and the fretboard to adding direction to your playing instead of just scales: http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/navigating-the-minor-2-5-1-diminished-arps-and-the-t33.html

I'm also open for online Skype lessons. I can help you with jazz and just about anything else, I'm sure even your blues playing.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Nov 14, 2012,
MikeDodge
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2009
349 IQ
#10
Quote by a0kalittlema0n
I have been thinking the same thing as the TS forever. My only question is is there any type of progression in learning jazz? I keep hearing "learn millions of chord extensions." I see and have learned a bit about substitution of chords and how millions of possibilities are out there.

My next thing is learning standards. Where the heck to i begin doing this. There are like 5 billion jazz standards, and I don't understand all the jargon that comes with it. I dont understand have 400 people can play one song and have it all be different.

I have also looked up jazz rhythm to help me learn more, but the rhythm seems to be generally simple (compared to the theory of jazz chords)

I also don't understand if I'm supposed to make my own crazy progressions from a ii V I and make my own melodies? or am I supposed to play mostly other jazz pieces (or standards)?


You'll find in jazz standards that all of the cool lines, money notes, and chord extensions, inversion, sub, etc are usually found right in the melody. Start with the tune called Tune Up, that melody nails altered tones throughout. It's nothing but notes that signify modulation. When people "think of the jazz sound" it's usually that sound of modulation...it always sounds like it's going somewhere or has direction.

So, don't just learn the melody, but learn in how it relates to the chord at the time. You'll be amazed at how many tunes use the same progression but have different melodies.

But yeah, learn you major and minor 2-5-1's and the variations. If you can't make it sound like jazz today, the only way to is to keep work on them and experimenting while playing through them. You'll find how to get from one chord to next after while. Just keep trying though.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Nov 13, 2012,
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#11
Quote by nasserliverpool
Now I've been a blues player ever since I started playing guitar. Throughout the years, I've heard and listened to many jazz artists and at times wanted to explore the world of jazz. As soon as I start my efforts, I hit this wall of jargon and jazz terminology that just intimidates me in a musical sense. Its been a while since I heard a good jazz player until I stumbled upon this gem of a video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zufIbIu_IxA&feature=plcp

The improv he starts at 0:42 just blows me away. There are a few questions that stem from his playing. One is what kind of jazz that improv follows and if there are any guitarists who have the same style. The second would be what recommendations the wise people of these forums have for an aspiring guitarist looking to explore the world of jazz.

Jazz is hard isn't it? Allll those scales and chords.

It's only hard cuz it's not mainstream anymore. We didn't grow up with it, it's not in our ears.

Transcribe old jazz tunes. Particularly melody, then figure out the chords underneath it. Transcribe the bass line. Jazz is nearly all ii-V-I's all of the time.

The fancy chord extensions you can add to your taste. And that is nothing more than basic theory knowledge of the major scale and harmony.
Last edited by mdc at Nov 14, 2012,
Infinitychord95
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2012
174 IQ
#12
Hey guys i wanna know if there's any way i can download or buy all of django's music. Any ideas?