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#81
Shit, we have an amazingly complex procedure compared to the states. First of all, we have to be 18 before we can legaly get a license, not 16 or whatever it is in the US. At least we can drink at 18

Anyway.
First you have to pass the school road regulation tests
Then you have to pass first aid class, and pass the test.
Then you have to pass the state road regulation tests (that most people fail the 1st time)
Then you have to go to driving school and rack up like 20 hours
Then you take the school driving test
And rack up some more hours.
After you did all of that, you are eligeble to take the state driving test with an examiner present (most people fail this on their first try as well)
And lastly, you have to finish a "safe driving" corse in two years after getting your drivers license, otherwise you can't extend it.

To top it off you are a "young driver" untill you turn 21 or you have had the license for 2 years, whatever comes later. Being a young driver means you get higher penalties, have to have 0.00% alcohol level at all times, and only have 1/3 of penalty points that normal drivers have.
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#82
Just make sure the clutch isn't complete shit and you'll be able to pick it up well enough to get from point A to point B.
Quote by element4433
Be subtle with it. Don't like molest him.

And cup his balls.


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If there's anything to take away from this thread, anything at all, it's to always cup the balls.
#83
Quote by gorkyporky
Shit, we have an amazingly complex procedure compared to the states. First of all, we have to be 18 before we can legaly get a license, not 16 or whatever it is in the US. At least we can drink at 18

Anyway.
First you have to pass the school road regulation tests
Then you have to pass first aid class, and pass the test.
Then you have to pass the state road regulation tests (that most people fail the 1st time)
Then you have to go to driving school and rack up like 20 hours
Then you take the school driving test
And rack up some more hours.
After you did all of that, you are eligeble to take the state driving test with an examiner present (most people fail this on their first try as well)
And lastly, you have to finish a "safe driving" corse in two years after getting your drivers license, otherwise you can't extend it.

To top it off you are a "young driver" untill you turn 21 or you have had the license for 2 years, whatever comes later. Being a young driver means you get higher penalties, have to have 0.00% alcohol level at all times, and only have 1/3 of penalty points that normal drivers have.


Each state has their own driving laws here. My state just happens to be very lax. I recieved my permit and started driving class at 15. Got my license at 16. At 21 I recieved my adult license. I don't remember what the difference was.

I also went to a racing school later lol I enjoy learning more about driving, I think it should be harder to get a license here. It's waaay too easy.
#84
It's incredibly easy to get a license in California.

Take written permit test.
3 sessions with a licensed instructor.
40 hours of driving time with licensed driver
Behind the wheel test.

The 40 hours of driving doesn't even need to be done because it's not monitored. My behind the wheel test was about 15 minutes long. I didn't need to drive on the freeway or parallel park. Also, you don't need a separate license for driving manual.
#85
You can learn it in a day, but to be able to drive smoothly takes time and alot of practice.
Sincerely,
Shitstirrer
#86
In Florida you don't even to do instructor sessions. You just do the written test for the learner's permit, and then once you're 16 you can take the driving exam at any time. Not even an obstacle course or anything--they just take you out on the road for 10 minutes and every once in a while tell you to do a hard stop or a three-point turn.
#87
Yeah, I wouldn't trust any 16 year old driving over here.
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#89
Quote by Thrill-house
You can learn how in 2 days but you probably won't feel comfortable enough to drive on the road with other people.


This. I learned in about an hour, and I have it all in my head, but whenever I take it out I usually stay off the main roads still. I stall at least once every time.
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#92
Yup.

Especially with an old beater, then you can just drive it like a tractor and be rough with it without worrying about it exploding in your face.

Gently play with the clutch, don't over do the gas, and slowly get it into first. Evry car is different, every car will take getting used to.

Then it's just clutch in, switch gears, clutch out. You'll be laughing once you get it. It's really no big deal.
#93
Quote by K'Nuckles
Oddly enough, I can drive manual perfectly fine, but I can't drive an automatic - last time I tried I just didn't get it.


How does that work...
Sincerely,
Shitstirrer
#96
it cannae be that hard

>hasn't had his first lesson yet
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#97
Quote by genghisgandhi
If I really put my mind and energy into learning how to drive a car (actually a shitty old pick-'em-up truck) with a stick shift, could I do it in two days?

You're already fairly good at handling long, hard objects. I think you could do it.
-The Crimson Fucker, aka PonyFan #376121
#98
my friend tried to teach my stick. it was hard to try to learn in a parking lot because i never really needed to shift. and then i tried to go up a steep ass hill. stalled out on it. lol.

if you really tried, i bet you could do it though. it's really just about getting the mechanics down. it's like learning a lick or something. just repetition of the motion until it becomes ... automatic.
#DTWD
#99
Traditional sticks will be phased out in favor of DSGs within our lifetimes anyway, and a retard could work paddle shifters. Audi and Volkswagen have already said they're working on cancelling traditional manual transmission production. Porsche and BMW will follow suit eventually. Then it'll ht economical cars, and by 2030 you'll be hard-pressed to buy a new car with a single clutch manual.
Last edited by Seref at Nov 17, 2012,
#100
Quote by Seref
DSGs

I like using unexplained acronyms too. FTNV, amirite?
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#101
Quote by gorkyporky
Shit, we have an amazingly complex procedure compared to the states. First of all, we have to be 18 before we can legaly get a license, not 16 or whatever it is in the US. At least we can drink at 18

*process*


I got my licence in the state of Utah and it was sort of like that. I took drivers ed as a high school class so most of that was just thrown in with the course. You are supposed to have forty hours but it's not enforced. I wish ours was more extensive like yours to be honest, because even though I very rarely drive (I haven't driven since around June) if I see a wreck, I likely won't be able to assist the wounded as I should and such.

Edit: I just realised I'm responding to a post from four days ago. And the OT is a bit outdated now since two days have passed.
Last edited by slipknot5678 at Nov 17, 2012,
#102
Quote by Hydra150
I like using unexplained acronyms too. FTNV, amirite?


Direct Shift Gearbox.

Sort of complicated, but its a type of manual transmission with two (automated) clutches. The driver controls upshifts and downshifts with electronic paddles or buttons rather than a mechanical stick. No clutch pedal.

It shifts much faster than a normal manual and can function in a fully automatic mode when desired. Most sports cars will be on this system by the end of the decade.
#103
I can only drive an automatic. I don't have my license because I'm lazy but I'm pretty sure I can pass the test!
#104
Quote by Seref
Direct Shift Gearbox.

Sort of complicated, but its a type of manual transmission with two (automated) clutches. The driver controls upshifts and downshifts with electronic paddles or buttons rather than a mechanical stick. No clutch pedal.

It shifts much faster than a normal manual and can function in a fully automatic mode when desired. Most sports cars will be on this system by the end of the decade.


Which makes me sad :c I like shifting with the clutch
#105
Quote by DukeDeRox
Which makes me sad :c I like shifting with the clutch


I do too, but after driving a Volks GTI with a dsg...It was a lot of fun. All the torque of that turbo combined with the amazingly fast shifts makes you accelerate like a rocket.
#106
When I was at Bondurant they had sequential shifters and you didn't need to use the clutch. That was the weirdest thing to me at 18. It was great for around the track but I think I'm more of a casual driver who likes to play around with foot work. Like I feel occupied when drivng on the road.
When you're on the track you have enough to worry about lol
#108
Quote by genghisgandhi
Alright so I have a question. When you're starting from a stop, do you release the clutch and then push the gas, or the other way around?

Kind of both. You're not supposed to be pushing the gas when you're clutch is in or half-way through, but in first and at very low speeds, it's no big deal. It also depends on the car. My old blazer would barely need any gas, like to the point where if I was rolling at like 2km/h and going back into first after coasting or something, I wouldn't even put my foot on the gas.

So really it's just a mix of both. Slowly release the clutch, if you feel your revs drop, pedal on the gas ever so slightly and eventually you'll just sort of know how much gas/clutch you need to start it up.
#109
Quote by metalblaster
Kind of both. You're not supposed to be pushing the gas when you're clutch is in or half-way through, but in first and at very low speeds, it's no big deal. It also depends on the car. My old blazer would barely need any gas, like to the point where if I was rolling at like 2km/h and going back into first after coasting or something, I wouldn't even put my foot on the gas.

So really it's just a mix of both. Slowly release the clutch, if you feel your revs drop, pedal on the gas ever so slightly and eventually you'll just sort of know how much gas/clutch you need to start it up.

Alright, thanks.

I'm pretty good with this so far, except 1) starting from a stop 2) I can't go under 5 mph very well, and as a result can't really park that well
#110
Quote by genghisgandhi
Alright, thanks.

I'm pretty good with this so far, except 1) starting from a stop 2) I can't go under 5 mph very well, and as a result can't really park that well


sounds about right. lol. done any sweet burnouts by accident?
#111
Quote by genghisgandhi
Alright, thanks.

I'm pretty good with this so far, except 1) starting from a stop 2) I can't go under 5 mph very well, and as a result can't really park that well



You should try reversing up a hill, lots of fun.

Especially if the car has a lightened flywheel. >_>
People in the pit take my post way too seriously.

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#112
Quote by genghisgandhi
Alright, thanks.

I'm pretty good with this so far, except 1) starting from a stop 2) I can't go under 5 mph very well, and as a result can't really park that well


Starting and driving at low speed are the hardest parts. It's all about clutch control. It just takes time and practice.
"Music snobbery is the worst kind of snobbery. 'Oh, you like those noises? Those sounds in your ear? Do you like them? They're the wrong sounds. You should like these sounds in your ear.'"
- Dara O'Briain
#113
Quote by genghisgandhi
fucm you you bitch i bet i have more pubic hair then you



bet your boyfriend has some stuck in his teeth too
#115
Quote by Child In Time
Instead of saying DSG, just say Formula 1 gears.


No, because this would be wrong.

DSGs are electronically-assisted sequential mechanical transmissions. Formula 1 gearboxes aren't mechanical, they're pneumatic. The only similarities are that they shift sequentially.
#116
Depends on what you drive. I learned to drive stick (it's what I drive to this day) on a little Toyota Tacoma truck, and it took a lot of stalling out at first, but once you get it down, it's like riding a bicycle. Of course, every stick-shift vehicle is a little different with shifting. Rule of thumb for me is driving at a normal speed, shift once you hit about 3000 on the tachometer.
#117
After only ever driving manuals I thought that driving Automatic would feel weird. Earlier this year I drove an auto for a few days (work car) and it was so simple. By the end of the day I found myself getting complacent.

I did find that the transmition seems smoother in a manual.
RPD - Finger Pickin' Good
#118
Quote by genghisgandhi
Alright so I have a question. When you're starting from a stop, do you release the clutch and then push the gas, or the other way around?


Slowly release the clutch while giving it gas at the same time. The more the engine starts to rumble, the more gas you need to feed it. Eventually you'll get the feel of it.
#119
I can't honestly think of a reason anybody would prefer a manual to an auto. That's like preferring to get up to switch the channel on a tv instead of just using a ****ing remote. What are you guys, a bunch of cavemen?
pinga
#120
I like having more control over my vehicle. Engine braking FTW!

Once you've got the hang of it you don't even think about gear changes, you just do them. So it's not really any more difficult or requires any more effort.
"Music snobbery is the worst kind of snobbery. 'Oh, you like those noises? Those sounds in your ear? Do you like them? They're the wrong sounds. You should like these sounds in your ear.'"
- Dara O'Briain