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#41
This is a post I read from another forum:

"An electric guitar is not a quiet acoustic guitar. An electric guitar works because a vibrating (ferrous metal) string causes a flux in the magnetic field of the pickup which is converted into a small electric current by the pickup coils. That current is then amplified and the sound transmitted via the amp loudspeaker.

A magnetic pick up does not and cannot amplify sounds generated by the wood of the guitar. When you play an electric guitar unamplified the vibrating strings (and to a much lesser extent the body of the guitar) causes air molecules to vibrate which carry the sound to your ear. A pick up does not do that. When you "hear" an amplified electric guitar you are actually hearing the amp loudspeaker."


I am not saying tonewood does or doesn't exist but I do think it is a very clever marketing ploy. The only way a company could know if a piece of wood sounded good was if they made it into a pre-guitar to see how it sounded and then made it into a final guitar based on how it sounded. What they probably do is pick the nice looking pieces of wood, judging a book by it's cover so to speak.

That and wood isn't very expensive I got a Grade AAA 1 piece Ash Blank for £50 ($75 ).
Last edited by MegadethFan18 at Nov 14, 2012,
#42
Quote by OliOsbourne
I'm sure that if you put a pickup in an acoustic and plugged it in, the wood would matter...

If it was an actually magnet pickup and not a microphone pickup, the wood wouldn't make a difference.
#43
Quote by MegadethFan18
This is a post I read from another forum:

"An electric guitar is not a quiet acoustic guitar. An electric guitar works because a vibrating (ferrous metal) string causes a flux in the magnetic field of the pickup which is converted into a small electric current by the pickup coils. That current is then amplified and the sound transmitted via the amp loudspeaker.

A magnetic pick up does not and cannot amplify sounds generated by the wood of the guitar. When you play an electric guitar unamplified the vibrating strings (and to a much lesser extent the body of the guitar) causes air molecules to vibrate which carry the sound to your ear. A pick up does not do that. When you "hear" an amplified electric guitar you are actually hearing the amp loudspeaker."


I am not saying tonewood does or doesn't exist but I do think it is a very clever marketing ploy. The only way a company could know if a piece of wood sounded good was if they made it into a pre-guitar to see how it sounded and then made it into a final guitar based on how it sounded. What they probably do is pick the nice looking pieces of wood, judging a book by it's cover so to speak. That and wood isn't very expensive I got a Grade AAA 1 piece Ash Blank for £50 ($75 ).


+1 (although I'm very convinced tonewood doesn't exist.) It's nice to know not everyone on UG is guitarded.
#44
Quote by Sullinger
IT DOES HAVE EVIDENCE, LOOK AT MY POST JUST ABOVE.


Quote by Sullinger
(finally someone who can think for themselves)

There are plenty of variables, but it's just impossible for the wood a magnet sits on to change the amount of different freq. it picks up. People just buy it because that's what guitar companies want you to think. Eventually I'll take the time and money to but the exact same guitar, but with different fingerboard woods, and switch out the pickup and do a blind switch test. I'll even switch out the pots, jack, etc.


So your evidence is, " it's just impossible for the wood a magnet sits on to change the amount of different freq. it picks up." So you are saying that the magnet is the only thing that determines a guitar's tone? What about the strings and what they are made of, do you realize that strings are pressed against the fingerboard? Don't you think the type of wood the fingerboard is made of has an effect on the guitar's sound since the strings are constantly in contact with the fretboard when a note is fretted?

A guitar's sound is not defined as "the pickup." Other things factors are involved. That is an indisputable fact, and when you deny facts, it makes you look stupid.

This is simple.

(Guess I'm going to have to try to ask that pickup question another time XD)
#45
Quote by Sullinger
(finally someone who can think for themselves)

get over yourself. I told you why your arguments don't hold water. I'm not regurgitating anything anyone else has said either.
#46
Megadethfan actually made a valid point, but if the wood has no effect, what has stopped companies from not making a mold and pouring some sort of plastic into it and selling it for the same price? Build costs would plummet due to only having to pour some stuff into a mold and wire it up. no sawing, sanding, etc etc
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#47
Quote by KSEjunkie2468
So your evidence is, " it's just impossible for the wood a magnet sits on to change the amount of different freq. it picks up." So you are saying that the magnet is the only thing that determines a guitar's tone? What about the strings and what they are made of, do you realize that strings are pressed against the fingerboard? Don't you think the type of wood the fingerboard is made of has an effect on the guitar's sound since the strings are constantly in contact with the fretboard when a note is fretted?

A guitar's sound is not defined as "the pickup." Other things factors are involved. That is an indisputable fact, and when you deny facts, it makes you look stupid.

This is simple.

(Guess I'm going to have to try to ask that pickup question another time XD)


You obviously don't get how an electric guitar works; the pickup (which is a magnet) is the only thing that goes to the amp. It picks up the string's vibration, thus recreating the note via amp. Sure it's fretted, but the wood is really affecting the sustain (and other things like that) not the tone (which is just the shape of the wave a note makes) These "facts" are/were created by the guitar companies to make money; you're stupid for actually falling for it.
#48
Quote by mrsixstrings12
Megadethfan actually made a valid point, but if the wood has no effect, what has stopped companies from not making a mold and pouring some sort of plastic into it and selling it for the same price? Build costs would plummet due to only having to pour some stuff into a mold and wire it up. no sawing, sanding, etc etc


Well, because no one would fall for tonal plastic. Tonewood works with acoustics, so the average person would believe the same thing would go for electrics. They have these "tonal woods" for electrics so people will buy more guitars. It's cheaper to replace the pickups and pots in a $100 guitar then to buy a $1000 guitar (but there's build quality, too)... And if you're an avid guitar collector, you're going to buy the rosewood and maple fingerboard versions, since you want "tonal variety".
#49
Quote by W4RP1G
get over yourself. I told you why your arguments don't hold water. I'm not regurgitating anything anyone else has said either.


I already proved you wrong; you just didn't get it.
#50
Quote by Sullinger
Well, because no one would fall for tonal plastic.

According to your own theory, you would.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Nov 14, 2012,
#51
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
According to your theory, you would.


...no? My theory is that: the material the neck, body, and fingerboard are made of make no difference in a guitar's tone when it's plugged in. People would probably fall for tonal plastic, but it's easier to just follow the same traditional route with wood, something people have been falling for for about a century.
#52
Quote by Sullinger
You obviously don't get how an electric guitar works; the pickup (which is a magnet) is the only thing that goes to the amp. It picks up the string's vibration, thus recreating the note via amp. Sure it's fretted, but the wood is really affecting the sustain (and other things like that) not the tone (which is just the shape of the wave a note makes) These "facts" are/were created by the guitar companies to make money; you're stupid for actually falling for it.


And you say we sound like the people preaching 9/11 conspiracy theories when you're the one talking about the guitar company marketing conspiracy.

If the guitar companies were trying to make money they would say money by making guitar's out of plastic, as Mrsixstring12 pointed out, they would just poor w/e into a mold. These facts of mine weren't created by guitar companies. You say that we can't think for ourselves, well you can't hear for yourself, because different woods have affects on tone however subtle. You said "the pickup (which is a magnet) is the only thing that goes to the amp." Yea, with the exception that the the pickup is connected to a freaking guitar, its not just pickup ---> amp.

Here is the bottom line, the pickup picks up the string's vibration like you said, but not all guitars sound the same unplugged. Sometimes the strings have more of a high-end twang, or they sound a bit darker, some guitars are a bit more midrangey when they are unplugged. This proves that the pickup is not the absolute only thing that affects the sound of a guitar.

Case closed. Now stop acting so silly XD
Last edited by KSEjunkie2468 at Nov 14, 2012,
#53
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
According to your own theory, you would.


+1 if it makes ZERO difference on tone and the company proved it, people would be all over them
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#54
Quote by Sullinger
...no? My theory is that: the material the neck, body, and fingerboard are made of make no difference in a guitar's tone when it's plugged in. People would probably fall for tonal plastic, but it's easier to just follow the same traditional route with wood, something people have been falling for for about a century.

So i suppose an electric-acoustic guitar can be made of plastic too?
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
#55
Quote by KSEjunkie2468
And you say we sound like the people preaching 9/11 conspiracy theories when you're the one talking about the guitar company marketing conspiracy.

If the guitar companies were trying to make money they would say money by making guitar's out of plastic, as Mrsixstring12 pointed out, they would just poor w/e into a mold. These facts of mine weren't created by guitar companies. You say that we can't think for ourselves, well you can't hear for yourself, because different woods have affects on tone however subtle. You said "the pickup (which is a magnet) is the only thing that goes to the amp." Yea, with the exception that the the pickup is connected to a freaking guitar, its not just pickup ---> amp.

Here is the bottom line, the pickup picks up the string's vibration like you said, but not all guitars sound the same unplugged. Sometimes the strings have more of a high-end twang, or they sound a bit darker, some guitars are a bit more midrangey when they are unplugged. This proves that the pickup is not the absolute only thing that affects the sound of a guitar.

Case closed. Now stop acting so silly XD


Well, I should refuse to argue with someone who doesn't know the difference between "poor" and "pour", but I will anyways.
Acoustically, wood makes a difference. Strings will always make a difference. But it's just logic. Since you really know what your talking about, tell me how body wood and fingerboard wood changes the tone.
#56
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
So i suppose an electric-acoustic guitar can be made of plastic too?


It could be made of plastic. But, acoustically, material makes a difference. When you're using a magnetic pickup, it doesn't matter.
#57
Quote by Sullinger
...no? My theory is that: the material the neck, body, and fingerboard are made of make no difference in a guitar's tone when it's plugged in. People would probably fall for tonal plastic, but it's easier to just follow the same traditional route with wood, something people have been falling for for about a century.


So youre saying this art project of mine sounds the same as my epiphone les paul? I used the stock bridge pickup from my les paul to make it
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#58
He went from claiming it as fact to calling it his own theory. This thread must be saved.

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#59

This obviously has the same tone as a strat with the same pickups, electronics, etc...
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#60
This thread.....
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#62
Quote by mrsixstrings12
So youre saying this art project of mine sounds the same as my epiphone les paul? I used the stock bridge pickup from my les paul to make it


string distance, pots, and jacks make a difference too.
#64
Quote by Sullinger
I already proved you wrong; you just didn't get it.

You didn't prove shit, you just ignored what I said. You're not saying anything that's above my comprehension, bro. Again, get over yourself.
#65
Quote by W4RP1G
You didn't prove shit, you just ignored what I said. You're not saying anything that's above my comprehension, bro. Again, get over yourself.


Alright, yes, fingerboard material makes a difference with sustain and other things similar to that. I'm not saying material doesn't make a difference; just not a difference with tone.
#66
Quote by Sullinger
string distance, pots, and jacks make a difference too.


used the same electronics as my les paul. string distance would be just like fretting it at whatever fret i have it tuned to
Guitar Rig:
Fender Telecaster
Martin GPCPA5
Orange Rockerverb 50

Bass Rig:
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#67
Quote by Sullinger
Alright, yes, fingerboard material makes a difference with sustain and other things similar to that. I'm not saying material doesn't make a difference; just not a difference with tone.

No shit. I never said anything about sustain. Learn to read.
#68
Quote by Sullinger
Well, I should refuse to argue with someone who doesn't know the difference between "poor" and "pour", but I will anyways.
Acoustically, wood makes a difference. Strings will always make a difference. But it's just logic. Since you really know what your talking about, tell me how body wood and fingerboard wood changes the tone.


Firstly, grammar doesn't matter much in forums, I'm not sure what gave you the false impression that it did, and secondly,

Take for example, two unplugged guitars, one mahogany and one maple, the mahogany guitar is going to sound darker when it is unplugged (this will happen for most guitars when comparing mahogany to maple.

Take your guitar, strum all six (or seven w/e) strings open, and lightly touch your finger against the back of your fretboard. You are going to feel your fret-board resonating with little vibrations. Wood is used because WOOD RESONATES. That's why a flute made out of wood sounds different than a plastic flute. The body of the guitar resonates a lower frequency. Its why they're called woodwind instruments not dogshitwind or plasticwind. This resonating of the wood changes the tone of the guitar as when the string begins to vibrate the wood resonates affecting how the strings sound when strumming, the when the strings are vibrating, the pickup, picks up the vibration of the string, and amplifies it (like you said).
#69
Quote by KSEjunkie2468

Which pickup is...


warmer sounding?

super distortion

hotter even (not necessarily higher output but sounds hotter)?

not sure actually, they're both pretty hot.

Tighter bass?

the duncan probably has less bass. whether that means the dimarzio is less tight, though...

Better leads?

super distortion probably
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#70
Geez, I make one post and come back the next day and wtf is all this? I'm not sure if TS ever even actually answered my question.


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Last edited by Offworld92 at Nov 15, 2012,
#72
IMO from that video:

Blackout (Standard) > Distortion > EMTY Blackout > Blackout (Metal) > Invader > Gus G. Fire Blackout > Full Shred > 59/Custom Hybrid > Custom > Alternative 8 > JB > DimeBucker

Any idea if there's a similar thing for DiMarzios?

I never realised there were so many different Blackouts!
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#73
Quote by Firewind Raging
IMO from that video:

Blackout (Standard) > Distortion > EMTY Blackout > Blackout (Metal) > Invader > Gus G. Fire Blackout > Full Shred > 59/Custom Hybrid > Custom > Alternative 8 > JB > DimeBucker

Any idea if there's a similar thing for DiMarzios?

I never realised there were so many different Blackouts!

I agree with your top 2 choices, but I'd put the Custom 3rd though.
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