TubeBlues
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
588 IQ
#1
I need to choose between the Gibson Les Paul Studio Joe Bonamassa and the Gibson Les Paul Traditional Mahogany Satin.

I wish to have a Bonamassa tone. Any opinions?
rowan1234
Registered User
Join date: May 2005
25 IQ
#2
Well if you want the Bonamassa tone then go with the Bonamassa one i guess. Great guitar regardless anyway.
TubeBlues
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
588 IQ
#3
I am worried to buy a Studio VS a Traditional Satin. I don't know much about Gibson guitars, I've always played Fenders but from what I can read, the studios are not so great.

Any opinions?
Offworld92
One among the fence.
Join date: Nov 2009
7,563 IQ
#4
If you don't have the same amp and FX he used then it doesn't matter.

Can you try either? You should always just get the one that feels better - the more comfortable you are, the better you'll play, and therefore the better you'll sound.
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TubeBlues
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
588 IQ
#5
The Joe bonamassa has a Granadillo fretboard and the traditional satin has a layered rosewood fretboard, shouldn't I get rosewood?
GaryBillington
Last of a Dyin' Breed
Join date: Nov 2001
1,309 IQ
#6
Quote by TubeBlues
I am worried to buy a Studio VS a Traditional Satin. I don't know much about Gibson guitars, I've always played Fenders but from what I can read, the studios are not so great.

Any opinions?

There's nothing wrong with Studios. I have one & love it.

The Studios are designed to have all the same functioning parts as the more expensive models, they just don't have the cosmetic stuff like flametops & edge binding. I got the worn brown Studio with a particularly nice pattern in the wood (pic), I actually prefer the look of it to a flametop anyway.

The correct answer though, as is always the case in any guitar vs guitar thread, is to go to a shop and try them both. Buy the one you prefer. We can't tell you what your opinion will be.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Nov 20, 2012,
T00DEEPBLUE
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Join date: Oct 2010
2,245 IQ
#7
Quote by TubeBlues
The Joe bonamassa has a Granadillo fretboard and the traditional satin has a layered rosewood fretboard, shouldn't I get rosewood?

Granadillo fingerboards are fine. They're used a lot on woodwind instruments and it's actually quite sought after. It used to be referred to as a type of ebony and it's similar in density to ebony.

Also, there are nothing wrong with Studio's
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TubeBlues
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
588 IQ
#8
I went at the shop during lunch and tried a standard (2400 with burst buckers), a traditional (1900 with 57) and a studio (890 with PAF).

I definitely preferred the burst buckers on the standard, and really did not like the PAF.
The 57 were ok.

I also liked the brown unfinished studio there.

With this information, the Mahogany Satin could very much do the trick.
But again, should I get a studio faded brown and change the pickups to same money?
gregs1020
Hi mom!
Join date: Dec 2007
10,786 IQ
#9
do you like thin necks or fatter necks?

i mean, if you aren't comfortable playing it...

the trad satin should have a 60s neck which is quite a bit thinner than the JB or the faded.

just my .02.
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MrFlibble
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Join date: Apr 2008
4,127 IQ
#10
Gibsons don't vary in tone just because of the model of pickup they have in them. With a constructed like a Les Paul and with low-output pickups like those, the wood plays a big part in their tone and you can get two ''identical'' Gibsons, of the exact same model with the same pickups, that sound and feel very different.

The trick to buying Gibsons is this: forget model names, forget spec sheets, forget the 'maths' of getting to a particular tone. Just try a whole bunch out and when you find one that sounds and feels the way you like, buy that one right then and there.

If you liked the Standard, go back to that shop and buy that. If you liked the Worn/Faded Studio (don't call it "unfinished", because that implies the finish has been stripped off) more then go back and buy that one. If you liked them both the same, give them another try right next to each other and see if one edges ahead.
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TubeBlues
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2012
588 IQ
#11
I ended up ordering a 2011 Gibson Les Paul Traditional Gold Top, for 2250$ including sale taxes, or 1980$ excluding sale taxes.

I'll do a full review when I get it in about 3 weeks, the store has to order it from the main warehouse.

I wasn't sure if I wanted a second amplifier or the Gibson, I went with the Gibson... I loved it way to much to not buy it.
patriotplayer90
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2007
2,825 IQ
#12
Quote by MrFlibble
Gibsons don't vary in tone just because of the model of pickup they have in them. With a constructed like a Les Paul and with low-output pickups like those, the wood plays a big part in their tone and you can get two ''identical'' Gibsons, of the exact same model with the same pickups, that sound and feel very different.

The trick to buying Gibsons is this: forget model names, forget spec sheets, forget the 'maths' of getting to a particular tone. Just try a whole bunch out and when you find one that sounds and feels the way you like, buy that one right then and there.

If you liked the Standard, go back to that shop and buy that. If you liked the Worn/Faded Studio (don't call it "unfinished", because that implies the finish has been stripped off) more then go back and buy that one. If you liked them both the same, give them another try right next to each other and see if one edges ahead.

I wouldn't exactly call any Gibson pickups "low-output". But that term may vary from one person to another.