#1
I can get up to max A4 with my chest voice so i tried a couple of weeks ago to try sing with my head voice, at first it sounded very squeeky and i sounded like a 10 year old girl XD, but i've tried to fix that. I'll post a very short clip and let you decide if I use head voice or if it's all falsetto (i think the first two high notes are falsetto I'm not sure but the rest is head voice)

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/82776193/remember%20me.mp3
#2
Sounds like all the high notes are a falsetto.

Try starting on a low note and gradually sliding all the way up to the highest note you can hit. you should feel/hear a break in your phonation. This is the line between head voice and falsetto (which is often considered an extension of the head voice, although I like to distinguish them).

This break is what causes boys' voices to crack. When a male's voice changes in puberty, it is caused by the vocal folds widening. A wider vocal chord means a deeper tone. Whenever you sing higher notes, you stretch your vocal folds so that you get a narrower vibration.

Falsetto is interesting because only the very edges of your vocal folds vibrate. In full voice, or modal voice (which includes chest, mixed, and head) a large percentage of the glottis (vocal fold) vibrates, whereas in falsetto, most of the glottis is contracted, and doesn't vibrate. Here is a visual representation: Stroboscopy.

Sorry if that was a lot of unnecessary physiological information. I personally think it helps you visualize and understand what's going on. This may be some more practical information, though:

Falsetto is a weaker/purer sound. Because less of your vocal fold is vibrating, your tone loses a lot of the harmonic overtones (i.e. full tone quality), although with good technique you can get a pretty awesome sounding falsetto, it just lacks the lower overtones. You can also distinguish falsetto because it makes it harder to articulate (i.e. use consonants) as well.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
Yep, falsetto. If you want something to compare to then think of "I was made for loving you" by Kiss. The high notes are all falsetto in this one. So falsetto does have its uses in certain styles. Dickinson from Iron maiden on the hand uses mostly head voice for his higher notes.
#4
Okay, thanks for the info. I started Bret Manning's Singing Success yesterday and I've realized that my head voice seems to be strongest at around D5 and above, and i tend to use falsetto on the notes below (between G#4-C#5 perhaps). I am suppose to use mixed voice in that region right? I'm only on CD2 so i haven't come that far yet.
#5
Quote by tottsk1
Okay, thanks for the info. I started Bret Manning's Singing Success yesterday and I've realized that my head voice seems to be strongest at around D5 and above, and i tend to use falsetto on the notes below (between G#4-C#5 perhaps). I am suppose to use mixed voice in that region right? I'm only on CD2 so i haven't come that far yet.


That's pretty much what you're aiming for. Chest for the lower notes, Mix from your lower mid-notes to your high notes and then reinforced falsetto for the extreme highs. Once you get that down, you can essentially start singing like Rob Halford.

As for finding your mix voice, that's a beast on its own and everyone learns at their own pace. Good luck to ya