#1
Alright, so I'm looking to get into recording, and I have been looking at different options and I've got a question, With the higher end USB microphones out there, is an audio interface truly necessary in a home studio? I'm trying to decide whether it would be worth it to get something like a Blue Yeti, or should I just look into getting a USB mixer that can utilize any mics I would pick up in the future?


EDIT: hahaha there's a typo in the title and I feel stupid now.

Must Not Sleep.


Must Warn Others.

Gear:
Gibson Special Faded SG
Orange Tiny Terror (Combo)
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Dunlop Crybaby Wah

3DS friend code: 3995-7035-3562
Last edited by an epic mistake at Dec 11, 2012,
#3
I would say if you want any legitimacy, yes you need an interface (and not a USB mixer, mind you!). USB mics can be great tools on a seriously limited budget and some of them sound alright (better than a $50 codenser) but if you're planning on building up, get a decent interface.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#4
Interface all the way... maybe Eleven rack or anything like that, because it can be used as an USB interface plus direct recording plus re amping plus...
TH3 G3Ar
- JCM 900 SL-X and SV MKII 100HD with LIne 6 sv412
-Bunch of pedals ( WD,BM,NR-2...)
-Ibanez Universe uv777pbk,Rg 2550&321mh
-http://backtorlyeh.bandcamp.com/
#5
Yes you need an interface.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#6
I had a feeling that this would be the consensus. I do plan on building up and eventually having a respectable recording rig, so I'l probably invest in one. Thanks for the feedback.

Must Not Sleep.


Must Warn Others.

Gear:
Gibson Special Faded SG
Orange Tiny Terror (Combo)
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Dunlop Crybaby Wah

3DS friend code: 3995-7035-3562
#7
interface. so much more options with it, you'll be happy you bought one.
#8
You need an interface if you want to go direct in or use XLR mics, but you can use a good USB mic (they even make reasonably priced tube USB tube condensers now) and get excellent results. On this nirvana cover on my profile we recorded every instrument with a single rockband cheap-o logitech USB mic, and this original was recorded on my own acoustically with a single guitar hero USB mic for vocals and guitar at the same time.

As someone said, if you're building up a studio an interface would be best, but IMO for acoustic or solo projects a decent USB would get great results too. If you're planning to do multiple tracks simultaneously an interface would be best, but you can get a better quality USB mic for $100-150 than a $100 interface.
Last edited by tukk04 at Dec 11, 2012,
#9
An interface can do wonders for recording, editing, etc...etc...
http://www.twitter.com/iamcIine

ESP Eclipse II Standard
Krank Revolution+
Krank Revolution 4x12
MXR 10-Band EQ
Dunlop Crybaby 535Q
MXR Custom Comp
Maxon OD808
Boss NS-2
#10
This is going to sound like a recording (pardon the pun), but if you have the budget and are truly serious about recording, you need an interface. Have a close look at your budget and what you intend to accomplish, then come back and ask us more questions and make an educated decision on which one to buy.

I started off with a USB2 Tascam US-2000 a few years ago and graduated to a Presonus Studio Live 16.4.2 mixing desk about a year ago. The Tascam could no longer meet my needs. I also have a double rack. Pics are in My Gear if you care to check out my small home studio. This is the only way to go.
#11
So, I guess the question is, could I get a decent mic for recording vocals and guitar (both acoustic and electric) for about 100 bucks? I assume the interface thread is where I'd look at to find out what I would get there.

Must Not Sleep.


Must Warn Others.

Gear:
Gibson Special Faded SG
Orange Tiny Terror (Combo)
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Dunlop Crybaby Wah

3DS friend code: 3995-7035-3562
#12
If you're on a budget you can do a great job with USB mics, but in all honesty it's just easier in the long run to get an interface.

People give USB condensers a bad rap though - the results can be just as good as any other budget condenser.
#13
If you're buying an interface, a decent mic for recording vocals and electric guitar is the Shure SM-58 or SM-57. The 57 is generally billed as an instrument mic, while the 58 is marketed as a vocal mic. To be honest, they're actually quite similar and use the same capsule. I have both here. Both of those mics are generally not thought of, when it comes to recording acoustic guitar. Your best bet there is to go direct into your interface, assuming you have a pickup system on your acoustic, or to buy a condenser mic.
#14
Quote by KG6_Steven
If you're buying an interface, a decent mic for recording vocals and electric guitar is the Shure SM-58 or SM-57. The 57 is generally billed as an instrument mic, while the 58 is marketed as a vocal mic. To be honest, they're actually quite similar and use the same capsule. I have both here. Both of those mics are generally not thought of, when it comes to recording acoustic guitar. Your best bet there is to go direct into your interface, assuming you have a pickup system on your acoustic, or to buy a condenser mic.

NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO


They're only really good for electric guitar - and you can already get great results using VST amp sims. Condenser is the way to go for vocals and acoustic guitar on a budget.


I completely understand what you're saying, but the problem is that people who're new to recording just see posts like this, don't read into it, then go ahead and buy a 57/58 thinking it'll do everything brilliantly. A month later you say threads asking 'why do my vocals sound so dull'.
Last edited by kyle62 at Dec 11, 2012,
#15
Quote by kyle62

I completely understand what you're saying, but the problem is that people who're new to recording just see posts like this, don't read into it, then go ahead and buy a 57/58 thinking it'll do everything brilliantly. A month later you say threads asking 'why do my vocals sound so dull'.


This. I've seen newbies just regurgitate that the SM57 can do all the things because they don't really understand it when people say that it CAN record stuff, and assume it means just because it'll pick up sound waves in certain situations that it's the right mic for the job.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#16
I didn't really think about plugging direct into the interface with either the acoustic or the electric. So really, I'm looking for an okay condenser mic? I assume a decent cardioid would be okay for vocals, but I'd like the option for my acoustic to be recorded through a mic, I'm not sure how great the pre-amp is...

Must Not Sleep.


Must Warn Others.

Gear:
Gibson Special Faded SG
Orange Tiny Terror (Combo)
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Dunlop Crybaby Wah

3DS friend code: 3995-7035-3562
#17
Thoughts on using a USB mixer to record rather than an interface? If say for only recording bass or guitar DI. Not a full drum kit or anything
AMP:
Rocktron chameleon 2000
Roland GP16
Audio Technica wireless
Peavey valveking
Clydesdale custom case
GUITAR:
Indie super T black (modded with active and passive pickups)
Daisy Rock Rock Candy Special
#18
For just bass or guitar on their own (or even two together if you pan them hard L/R and split them once recorded) it's probably alright. For the price of a decent USB mixer though you should be able to get a reasonable interface.
#19
Quote by kyle62
NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO NO


They're only really good for electric guitar - and you can already get great results using VST amp sims. Condenser is the way to go for vocals and acoustic guitar on a budget.


I completely understand what you're saying, but the problem is that people who're new to recording just see posts like this, don't read into it, then go ahead and buy a 57/58 thinking it'll do everything brilliantly. A month later you say threads asking 'why do my vocals sound so dull'.



I'm going to disagree with you. To say that the 57 and 58 are only suited for electric guitar is totally wrong. Both are also good at vocals. The thing to realize is, that while a 58 may work well for my vocals, it may not work well for yours. Each person has to find that mic that works well for them - that's why studio engineers have a variety of mics to choose from - what works well for one artist may not be the best choice for the next. There are plenty of bands who swear by these mics, even some top acts.

Another thing to remember, is that most of those people with recording issues are new to the concept and have no clue how to record. Even putting the best mic in their hands would result in a crappy recording. Someone who knows what they're doing can take a cheap mic and turn out decent results.
#20
Quote by an epic mistake
I didn't really think about plugging direct into the interface with either the acoustic or the electric. So really, I'm looking for an okay condenser mic? I assume a decent cardioid would be okay for vocals, but I'd like the option for my acoustic to be recorded through a mic, I'm not sure how great the pre-amp is...



Keep your options open. Going direct into the console is something I do on a regular basis - in fact, I'm plugged directly into channel 9 of my console right with my Taylor acoustic. I also havethe option of swinging the boom of any of the mics in here and capturing my audio that way. Another thing I like to do, is plug my guitar into the mixer AND use a condenser mic.

For an okay condenser mic, have a look at Behringer and MXL. Neither of them will rival a higher end mic, but for starting out, the price can't be beat. As your budget and ear get better, you'll probably want to replace it with something better.
#21
Most microphones will have to be really good to recreate a sound from your guitar or amp. With that said, you'd probably have to pay a lot more money on buying a good mic. If anything, try a high end condensor mic. But a lot of interfaces are much cheaper and easier to record with. If you do happen to want a cheaper mic, a lot of shure sells good mics. I have the AT2020 and that is pretty good, but by no means tops my interface.
#22
Quote by KG6_Steven
I'm going to disagree with you. To say that the 57 and 58 are only suited for electric guitar is totally wrong. Both are also good at vocals. The thing to realize is, that while a 58 may work well for my vocals, it may not work well for yours. Each person has to find that mic that works well for them - that's why studio engineers have a variety of mics to choose from - what works well for one artist may not be the best choice for the next. There are plenty of bands who swear by these mics, even some top acts.


As had been told many a time on this board, but it still doesn't change the fact that 99 times outa 100 the Sm58 isn't the best choice.

Quote by Fridge101
Thoughts on using a USB mixer to record rather than an interface? If say for only recording bass or guitar DI. Not a full drum kit or anything


Bad idea. They are two completely different things, buy an interface.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#23
Quote by ChemicalFire
As had been told many a time on this board, but it still doesn't change the fact that 99 times outa 100 the Sm58 isn't the best choice.


Bad idea. They are two completely different things, buy an interface.

99 out of 100, i dunno.

IF you have a plethora of high end condensers available, then that might be the case. Unfortunately, most of the condensers that a newbie or anyone spending under 300 is goingto be using ...are going to have a potentially nasty high end, which can be extremely hard to EQ out. On the other hand something like an sm58 is going to give you a super strong mid range sound, and you can always add some high end back into it to add some clarity to the vocal...
#24
Pretty sure it's harder to add frequencies that aren't there than take away ones that are.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#25
Quote by KG6_Steven
I'm going to disagree with you. To say that the 57 and 58 are only suited for electric guitar is totally wrong. Both are also good at vocals. The thing to realize is, that while a 58 may work well for my vocals, it may not work well for yours. Each person has to find that mic that works well for them - that's why studio engineers have a variety of mics to choose from - what works well for one artist may not be the best choice for the next. There are plenty of bands who swear by these mics, even some top acts.
This is the same argument I see every time and it's completely valid.

However, it's also misleading. Neither is 'good' at vocals - they both work well in specific studio situations.

There are times when a Subkick is perfect on bass drum, but would you recommend buying one instead of a D112? Lord, no - they're far too situational.
And the Royer 121 ribbon can be amazing for capturing the smooth natural warmth of a blues guitar amp, but if you only had one mic to record guitar with you'd go with an SM57/MD421/i5 or something equally versatile.


When dealing with beginners, it's generally better to just tell them the SM57/58 are not suitable for studio vocals.

Just yesterday I saw a guy on Reddit who'd bought an SM57 to do vocals and acoustic guitar, and was upset at the poor results he was getting.
Although they're incredibly handy, durable mics I really think it'd be best if people avoided mentioning them for anything except electric guitar/snare when offering advice.
#26
Would my money be better spent on a mic that could focus primarily on vocals? Lets take the guitars out of the equation, since they would likely be recorded DI 99% of the time. Can I get a mic that is decent for vocals for about $150 or is that gonna be too little?

Must Not Sleep.


Must Warn Others.

Gear:
Gibson Special Faded SG
Orange Tiny Terror (Combo)
MXR Carbon Copy Delay
Dunlop Crybaby Wah

3DS friend code: 3995-7035-3562
#27
Quote by an epic mistake
Would my money be better spent on a mic that could focus primarily on vocals? Lets take the guitars out of the equation, since they would likely be recorded DI 99% of the time. Can I get a mic that is decent for vocals for about $150 or is that gonna be too little?

Yeah, no problem at all. Try the Studio Projects B3, Behringer B2 PRO, Golden Age FC1, Audio Technica AT2035, etc etc.