rabbittroopsux
Registered User
Join date: Aug 2008
958 IQ
#1
i can recognise melodic intervals okay, but i need some advice harmonically. maybe different ppls thought processes and strategies used before u could just feel them automatically.
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
AeolianWolf
Tonal Vigilante
Join date: Jul 2009
186 IQ
#2
play the harmonic intervals and sing both notes melodically. they are now melodic intervals.

it's going to take some practice before this comes to you quickly.

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Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
MattCox12345
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2012
1,242 IQ
#4
Try figure out which note it is. Say for example it's an A and the other is an E.
The gap is 5. Which makes it perfect. Therefore it is a perfect 5th. Here's a chart to help remember.

Perfect- 1,4,5,8
Major- 2,3,6,7

If it's perfect and made flat, depending on the key signature or if there is an accidental, then it becomes diminished. If it's made sharp, then it's augmented. If both notes are flat or sharp, then it goes back to either minor or perfect. If it's major and made flat, then it's minor, then if there are 2 flats it's diminished.
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#6
Quote by rabbittroopsux
i can recognise melodic intervals okay, but i need some advice harmonically. maybe different ppls thought processes and strategies used before u could just feel them automatically.

After a while, the harmonic intervals will have a certain "character" that you'll instinctively recognize as said interval. You'll just know from the way it sounds.

Just like a power chord, really. You know that's a perfect 5th. It's the most common thing to play on a guitar, a power chord.

If it helps, practice trying to recognize harmonic intervals as compound intervals (greater than an octave). You might find it easier to hear the high and low notes.

Ex.
-
-3
-
-
-3
-


Then try,
-
-
-
-0
-3
-
AeolianWolf
Tonal Vigilante
Join date: Jul 2009
186 IQ
#8
another exercise you can do is play a note and try to sing an interval above it.

train yourself on octaves/unisons, fifths, and fourths first (in that order). play an A, and sing an A. then play an A, and sing a different A, either an octave higher or lower.

once you're good with that, play an A and sing an E.

and once you can do that, play an A and sing a D.

once you have that, get thirds and sixths down. major third, minor third, major sixth, minor sixth. same method. the order for this doesn't really matter, but personally i found thirds to have been easier than sixths.

then seconds and sevenths. same deal. seconds are easy intervals to sing melodically, but at first they're a little difficult to sing with a harmonic interval a second away.

ultimately, you want to be singing EVERYTHING if you train you ear -- the fastest way to internalize pitch and music is to sing it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
macashmack
Maskcashmack
Join date: May 2011
3,359 IQ
#9
Quote by AeolianWolf
another exercise you can do is play a note and try to sing an interval above it.

train yourself on octaves/unisons, fifths, and fourths first (in that order). play an A, and sing an A. then play an A, and sing a different A, either an octave higher or lower.

once you're good with that, play an A and sing an E.

and once you can do that, play an A and sing a D.

once you have that, get thirds and sixths down. major third, minor third, major sixth, minor sixth. same method. the order for this doesn't really matter, but personally i found thirds to have been easier than sixths.

then seconds and sevenths. same deal. seconds are easy intervals to sing melodically, but at first they're a little difficult to sing with a harmonic interval a second away.

ultimately, you want to be singing EVERYTHING if you train you ear -- the fastest way to internalize pitch and music is to sing it.


I agree.
Also, learn your modes.