#1
Hi guys, stumbled upon this amazing backing track : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w6bJk8L5HOQ

So it is in G, but the top comment says that C sharp works well. Is this true ? Why ? To my knowledge, G's relatives are E minor and F sharp major, so what does the C sharp have to do with this ?

I am not too well versed in theory yet, could you enlighten me please ?
#2
The tritone (a sharp 4th/flat 5th. C# in the key of G) is part of the "blues scale" and has been utilized by jazz and blues greats all the way back to Louie Armstrong, so it's not unusual to like the dissonant flavor it provides if correctly utilized.
#3
I played some C sharp scales over this, and it sounds horrible. I think the guy had his guitar tuned a half step down, and actually played in C, which is the fourth degree from G. But it seems strange, with all the upvotes.
#4
C# the note works, not C# the scale.

The b5 is used all the time in blues.

And besides, with a little finesse you can make any note work in a blues.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
Quote by Jet Penguin
And besides, with a little finesse you can make any note work in a blues.


THIS. Just stop philosophizing about theory and play [EDIT:] whatever the hell sounds good to you. Theory is helpful, but it should not serve as restriction.
Quote by ChemicalFire
You get my first ever lolstack






The image in my head is just too funny for words at this point


Aw yeah.
Last edited by TheNameOfNoone at Dec 19, 2012,
#6
Quote by TheNameOfNoone
THIS. Just stop philosophizing about theory and play [EDIT:] whatever the hell sounds good to you. Theory is helpful, but it should not serve as restriction.


I knew that a preacher would eventually post (I've only been playing for 2 years, I can't join the church just yet)

So yeah, it's probably just the C sharp note... Kind of a stupid comment now that I think about it.