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#41
Quote by zaiura
And Rayge, if someone is ignorant enough to provoke a law enforcement officer, they deserve whatever wrath the officer subjects him to.


Really?

That's.......pretty stupid.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#42
Quote by Butt Rayge
I don't give a cuntsuck how many swear words you use.


Then how did you misunderstand the original point?

Why, Arby?
#43
The worst it could count as is a threat. Which, in my opinion, raising a finger on a hand isn't very threatening.
There's nothing left here to be saved
Just barreling dogs and barking trains
Another year lost to the blue line
#44
Quote by zaiura
Then how did you misunderstand the original point?

Why, Arby?

Now you think that the fact I disagree with your support of violence toward hand gestures is simply a misunderstanding? What exactly is it that you think I don't understand?
#45
Quote by Butt Rayge
Now you think that the fact I disagree with your support of violence toward hand gestures is simply a misunderstanding? What exactly is it that you think I don't understand?


I'm referencing your original response to my spew, mate. And I have to say, I don't exactly support violence, I'm just not shocked when it results from a stupid decision.
#46
Quote by zaiura

Why, Arby?


Why would you cede to anyone the right to beat your ass if you offended them?

Maybe he doesn't like how you look, how you talk, where you're from? Offense/Provocation can be taken about nearly anything if one is so inclined.


Officer: Hey! Did you see what color that car was that just took off out of here?

You: No, I was looking the other way and didn't see it.

Officer: You lying piece of shit, you're probably a friend of the driver's..whack, whack whack.....etc.

You: (Waking in hospital) Hey, why am I in a body cast?

Orderly: You provoked a cop, you're lucky we didn't just leave you on the street you scumbag!


Any other questions?
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#47
Quote by whywefight
Don't get too uptight about the specifics, he was just saying to treat him like a professional, the same way you'd treat doctors and teachers.


I treat them like any other person, car mechanic, nurse, professor or garbageman. I don't see why basic human respect and decency should change for police. They're servants of the public, we aren't subordinate to them.
#49
Quote by zaiura
I'm referencing your original response to my spew, mate. And I have to say, I don't exactly support violence, I'm just not shocked when it results from a stupid decision.

I didn't take issue with your swear words, just the fact that somehow in the process of writing (and then counting) them you lost track of what you were trying to say. Have you even read over what you wrote?
#50
So if I tell you two to play nice, will you have to flip me off and will I have to ban you two?

Lay off the vulgarity and keep the discussion civil. This isnt a democracy with a constitution and I will warn/ban you Butt Rayge/zaiura.

This is an unofficial warning.
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#51
Quote by Arby911
Why would you cede to anyone the right to beat your ass if you offended them?

Maybe he doesn't like how you look, how you talk, where you're from? Offense/Provocation can be taken about nearly anything if one is so inclined.


Officer: Hey! Did you see what color that car was that just took off out of here?

You: No, I was looking the other way and didn't see it.

Officer: You lying piece of shit, you're probably a friend of the driver's..whack, whack whack.....etc.

You: (Waking in hospital) Hey, why am I in a body cast?

Orderly: You provoked a cop, you're lucky we didn't just leave you on the street you scumbag!


Any other questions?


Congratulations, you've got a multi-million dollar law suit there, mate. Sure, your quality if living is terrible now, but at least this wasn't a strawman argument, and just an irrational what if. I'd consider it on a more pertinent light if had to do with my original point, about flipping off a police officer, not possibly looking like a dirtbag or a stranger.
#52
Quote by Nelsean
So if I tell you two to play nice, will you have to flip me off and will I have to ban you two?

Lay off the vulgarity and keep the discussion civil. This isnt a democracy with a constitution and I will warn/ban you Butt Rayge/zaiura.

This is an unofficial warning.

But but but he thinks police have the right to beat up anybody who offends them with a harmless hand gesture. He's the bad guy, not me.
#53
Quote by TooktheAtrain
I treat them like any other person, car mechanic, nurse, professor or garbageman. I don't see why basic human respect and decency should change for police. They're servants of the public, we aren't subordinate to them.

I don't see how acknowledging anyone as 'Sir' automatically makes you subordinate to them as a person. I've always seen 'Sir' as basically just a noun of respect.
#54
Quote by Butt Rayge
But but but he thinks police have the right to beat up anybody who offends them with a harmless hand gesture. He's the bad guy, not me.


Just no cursing at each other. Lol @ me doing this and the thread is exactly about this.
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#55
Quote by whywefight
I don't see how acknowledging anyone as 'Sir' automatically makes you subordinate to them as a person. I've always seen 'Sir' as basically just a noun of respect.


Oh, must be an American-English thing then. The only people you call 'sir' over here are those with knighthoods of some sort.
#56
Quote by Nelsean
Just no cursing at each other. Lol @ me doing this and the thread is exactly about this.

Now we see the violence inherent in the system! Repression! Repression!
Quote by TooktheAtrain
Oh, must be an American-English thing then. The only people you call 'sir' over here are those with knighthoods of some sort.

It really isn't used in America much at all. When I hear it used in everyday language here, its typically just something courteous to say, like to an elderly man while you open the door for him or something of the like
Last edited by whywefight at Jan 2, 2013,
#57
Quote by Butt Rayge
But but but he thinks police have the right to beat up anybody who offends them with a harmless hand gesture. He's the bad guy, not me.


Close enough, I guess. And sure thing, Nelsean.
#58
Quote by Nelsean
Just no cursing at each other. Lol @ me doing this and the thread is exactly about this.

The irony is not lost on me.
#59
I didn't think it would be necessary to defend myself when asking a simple question, but apparently it is.

1. I flipped off a cop.

2. I did it because he made an illegal right turn across my lane and cut me off.

3. He threatened to take me to jail on these charges.

4. I told him what he did and explained why it caused me to do what I did very calmly.

5. We don't have a crime rate in my town. Another police officer showed up simply because there was nothing else going on.
#60
Quote by whatadrag
I didn't think it would be necessary to defend myself when asking a simple question, but apparently it is.

1. I flipped off a cop.

2. I did it because he made an illegal right turn across my lane and cut me off.

3. He threatened to take me to jail on these charges.

4. I told him what he did and explained why it caused me to do what I did very calmly.

5. We don't have a crime rate in my town. Another police officer showed up simply because there was nothing else going on.


Eh, the 'responsible thing' would've been to report him to the precinct/city hall/etc. depending on the size of your city and wait for them to do absolutely nothing about it. Flipping him off wasn't the brightest thing to do. Odds are he was blowing smoke up your ass about charges though. If you got out of the supposed citation, it's because it probably wasn't worth his time to write it.
#61
Quote by whywefight
I don't see how acknowledging anyone as 'Sir' automatically makes you subordinate to them as a person. I've always seen 'Sir' as basically just a noun of respect.

"Sir" could be used from everything to the bag boy at the grocery store to the President of the US. It's a basic courtesy thing. If you think that some male is worthy of respect, call them "sir". Obviously, call the women "ma'am".

I personally believe that police officers are always worthy of respect.


Quote by zaiura
Eh, the 'responsible thing' would've been to report him to the precinct/city hall/etc. depending on the size of your city and wait for them to do absolutely nothing about it. Flipping him off wasn't the brightest thing to do. Odds are he was blowing smoke up your ass about charges though. If you got out of the supposed citation, it's because it probably wasn't worth his time to write it.

This.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jan 2, 2013,
#62
Quote by crazysam23_Atax

I personally believe that police officers are always worthy of respect.

lolwut

What about police officers who abuse their power to molest children? What about corrupt officers 'on the take'?
What about that cannibalistic officer a few months ago?

Do they all warrant respect?

mang, I would have agreed with you if you said 'mostly' instead of always.
Last edited by TooktheAtrain at Jan 2, 2013,
#63
Protected or not, flipping a cop off is the same as saying, "hello officer, please ruin my day". Cops have the power to haul your dumb ass off to jail whether you broke the law or just pissed them off. If you didn't break the law, you'll go free...probably after spending a few hours in the local lock up. Is it really worth it?
#64
Quote by TooktheAtrain
mang, I would have agreed with you if you said 'mostly' instead of always.

I meant "mostly". I apologize.
#65
After going through alot of dramas with police years ago I was sitting outside my home having a smoke and a cop car was approaching. Without even thinking my arm extended itself as did my middle finger. The cop seen this and pulled over and asked if I have a problem with my finger (lol). I said "no". He then said "I know where you live" and drove off.

Regardless of intent it's funny that humans can actually get angry about how we move our fingers and look at each other.
#66
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
I meant "mostly". I apologize.


ahh okay, I guess I should have assumed so anyway.
#67
Quote by whywefight
Now we see the violence inherent in the system! Repression! Repression!

It really isn't used in America much at all. When I hear it used in everyday language here, its typically just something courteous to say, like to an elderly man while you open the door for him or something of the like


It's not an American-English thing. Sir's all the rage up here. Maybe it's just not a South England thing. Everything's Sir here. It's practically become informal now. You go into a shop and it's "now then sir/how you doing sir?"
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#69
One time when I was little, I asked a cop for his autograph

Idk I have some good experiences with cops really being really nice to me, so I never was into the whole "Fuk da Police" thing.

I know there some bullshit cops out there though.
#70
I've only ever heard people say "sir" irl sarcastically.
Quote by EpiExplorer
I swear this guy in particular writes for the telegraph or some shit.

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My name can actually be traced back to as early as the 1990s, it means "fuck off data miner"
#71
Rarely do I hear anyone say "sir" here, and everyone is still polite and respectful.
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A SIGNATURE.
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Last edited by DonGlover at Jan 6, 2013,
#72
Quote by Trowzaa
It's not an American-English thing. Sir's all the rage up here. Maybe it's just not a South England thing. Everything's Sir here. It's practically become informal now. You go into a shop and it's "now then sir/how you doing sir?"

Oh, weird. I'm in the south-west (Gloucestershire) and I never hear anyone saying it.
#73
Yeah I use "sir" when mate wouldn't be appropriate. So mostly with older people or scary-looking ones.
#74
Quote by Crimson.King
Protected or not, flipping a cop off is the same as saying, "hello officer, please ruin my day". Cops have the power to haul your dumb ass off to jail whether you broke the law or just pissed them off. If you didn't break the law, you'll go free...probably after spending a few hours in the local lock up. Is it really worth it?

exactly no
#75
Quote by AtaBorMan
Americans' obsession with their rights is ridiculous. Just use some common sense, you don't have to do something just because you can.

thisthisthisthis
___

Quote by The_Blode
she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
#76
Quote by Trowzaa
It's not an American-English thing. Sir's all the rage up here. Maybe it's just not a South England thing. Everything's Sir here. It's practically become informal now. You go into a shop and it's "now then sir/how you doing sir?"


I use 'mate' for someone the same age or younger, always 'sir' for anyone 25- or older. It's just manners.
________ A
________C
________E
________!
#77
We addressed (most) male school teachers as sir.
You often hear people serving you in shops and such calling you/customers 'sir'.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Jan 3, 2013,
#78
Quote by zaiura
Congratulations, you've got a multi-million dollar law suit there, mate. Sure, your quality if living is terrible now, but at least this wasn't a strawman argument, and just an irrational what if. I'd consider it on a more pertinent light if had to do with my original point, about flipping off a police officer, not possibly looking like a dirtbag or a stranger.


You said, and I quote:

Quote by zaiura
[And Rayge, if someone is ignorant enough to provoke a law enforcement officer, they deserve whatever wrath the officer subjects him to.


As there was no limitation or exclusion there, let's not be moving the goalposts now...

According to you, there are NO grounds for a lawsuit.

Consistency matters.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#79
Quote by AtaBorMan
Americans' obsession with their rights is ridiculous. Just use some common sense, you don't have to do something just because you can.


Quote by Trowzaa
hurr durr fuq da police lol


These two things are perfect points and everything else should be ignored.
#80
The best way to piss off cops is to lay low and not get caught.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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