martinman777
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2012
268 IQ
#1
could someone explain to me why this works?
this chords sorta like a inverted power chord its
-----------
------------
-----------
-----1-----
-----1-----
-----3-----

it produces a neat gloomy sound and id love to know what it is and the name of it
KidZero
UG's Wafer Thin Mint
Join date: Nov 2010
644 IQ
#3
The notes are G, Bb, and Eb. It's an first inversion Eb major triad.
griffRG7321
Theory buff
Join date: Sep 2007
999 IQ
#4
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Eb major. It's a major chord where the top note is the root.


Awful explanation.

It's a first inversion Eb major chord.
Macabre_Turtle
UG's UGer
Join date: Oct 2006
640 IQ
#5
Quote by griffRG7321
Awful explanation.

It's a first inversion Eb major chord.


A 100% accurate explanation.
AeolianWolf
Tonal Vigilante
Join date: Jul 2009
186 IQ
#7
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
It's a major chord where the top note is the root.


that's a sentence where the fourth, eighth, and eleventh words are nouns.

it's a correct explanation, but it's awful. the two are not mutually exclusive.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Macabre_Turtle
UG's UGer
Join date: Oct 2006
640 IQ
#8
Quote by AeolianWolf
that's a sentence where the fourth, eighth, and eleventh words are nouns.

it's a correct explanation, but it's awful. the two are not mutually exclusive.


Well sorry I only felt the need to answer his question, and didn't feel the need to give him a full fledged lesson on chord inversions.
AeolianWolf
Tonal Vigilante
Join date: Jul 2009
186 IQ
#9
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Well sorry I only felt the need to answer his question, and didn't feel the need to give him a full fledged lesson on chord inversions.


oh. well, by all means, be sure to give all your answers from this moment on as though you were a columnist for the simple english page on wikipedia.

if you want to answer someone's question correctly, teach them something.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Macabre_Turtle
UG's UGer
Join date: Oct 2006
640 IQ
#10
Quote by AeolianWolf
oh. well, by all means, be sure to give all your answers from this moment on as though you were a columnist for the simple english page on wikipedia.

if you want to answer someone's question correctly, teach them something.


If he wanted a lesson in chord construction, triads, or inversions he would have asked for it, and I would've gave it to him. But he didn't. He asked what chord it was, and I answered him.
griffRG7321
Theory buff
Join date: Sep 2007
999 IQ
#11
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
If he wanted a lesson in chord construction, triads, or inversions he would have asked for it, and I would've gave it to him. But he didn't. He asked what chord it was, and I answered him.


A lesson on inversions wasn't necessary (actually it was, but no one as the time to bother writing up a lesson, there are plenty online). What was necessary was telling him what the chord was, which you didn't do very well.
Macabre_Turtle
UG's UGer
Join date: Oct 2006
640 IQ
#12
Quote by griffRG7321
A lesson on inversions wasn't necessary (actually it was, but no one as the time to bother writing up a lesson, there are plenty online). What was necessary was telling him what the chord was, which you didn't do very well.


"Eb major" somehow doesn't answer the question?
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#13
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
"Eb major" somehow doesn't answer the question?
That part of the answer was fine, but telling him that the top note was the root could be a bit misleading or just plain irrelevant.

I'm not trying to talk shit, but it would have been more helpful and less confusing to the TS to explain that the bass note was a note other than the root, specifically the third.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Macabre_Turtle
UG's UGer
Join date: Oct 2006
640 IQ
#14
Quote by food1010
That part of the answer was fine, but telling him that the top note was the root could be a bit misleading or just plain irrelevant.

I'm not trying to talk shit, but it would have been more helpful and less confusing to the TS to explain that the bass note was a note other than the root, specifically the third.


If he's asking us to figure out this chord for him, then he doesn't know what a third is yet. That's why I didn't go into detail about the inversion. I only noted that the root note was on top so that he could identify what chord he was playing if he was to try to move the shape elsewhere on the neck. That's all.
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#15
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
If he's asking us to figure out this chord for him, then he doesn't know what a third is yet. That's why I didn't go into detail about the inversion. I only noted that the root note was on top so that he could identify what chord he was playing if he was to try to move the shape elsewhere on the neck. That's all.
You're right. Mentioning the third might have confused him.

Still, I think the best response would just be to say Eb major with a different note on bottom.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
cdgraves
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
43 IQ
#16
It is a Gm6 begging for resolution to Gm.

You wouldn't typically label a Tonic as an inverted chord. The note of resolution for the bass generally defines tonic. In functional harmony, the names are not simply the result of mathematical derivation, but actual purpose in the music. A I6 chord is functionally distinct from a I chord because it implies melodic motion in the bass. Chords are usually only definitely "in inversion" as passing harmonies. Your ears tell you that any cadence resolving to a chord in inversion is incomplete.

Don't let triad formulas dictate what your ears hear! If someone hears "gloom", they are probably not describing an unstable major triad. The poster likely hears the minor 3rd (G and Bb), and the unresolved minor 6th is creating tension rather than redefining the harmony.

If the OP were to play this with a bassist else and say "It's in Eb", the resulting harmony would be very different than saying "It's in Gm". Put the notes on a piano and then put an Eb under them and compare to G as the root.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jan 4, 2013,
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#17
Quote by cdgraves
It is a Gm6 begging for resolution to Gm.

You wouldn't typically label a Tonic as an inverted chord. The note of resolution for the bass generally defines tonic. In functional harmony, the names are not simply the result of mathematical derivation, but actual purpose in the music. A I6 chord is functionally distinct from a I chord because it implies melodic motion in the bass. Chords are usually only definitely "in inversion" as passing harmonies. Your ears tell you that any cadence resolving to a chord in inversion is incomplete.

Don't let triad formulas dictate what your ears hear! If someone hears "gloom", they are probably not describing an unstable major triad. The poster likely hears the minor 3rd (G and Bb), and the unresolved minor 6th is creating tension rather than redefining the harmony.

If the OP were to play this with a bassist else and say "It's in Eb", the resulting harmony would be very different than saying "It's in Gm". Put the notes on a piano and then put an Eb under them and compare to G as the root.
Of course, context is everything. I wasn't under the assumption it was a tonic chord, so Eb/G made more sense to me.

He did say gloomy, so if you're assuming G as the root, that would actually be a Gm(b6) or addb13 if you like. Gm6 would be G Bb D E, with the major 6th, rather than the minor 6th (Eb).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
macashmack
Maskcashmack
Join date: May 2011
3,359 IQ
#18
I love me some minor major 6's.
TS, inversions are used for voice leading. You now know inversions.
No need to argue anymore
griffRG7321
Theory buff
Join date: Sep 2007
999 IQ
#19
Given no context and assuming it's Gm6 - lol

Thinking G Bb Eb is the formula for Gm6 - even bigger lol
martinman777
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2012
268 IQ
#20
thanks guys it slipped my mind that it might have just been a different voicing of a basic triad
Last edited by martinman777 at Jan 4, 2013,
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#21
hahaha i was hoping one of the earlier posters would have called it an Eb6, but it looks like some people didn't even need the bait to think it wasn't an inversion
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#23
Quote by mdc
...and if the bassist was playing a C like yeah whatever...


how do you know this chord isn't being played on a 6-string bass?!
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
mdc
UG's Mr Chord Man
Join date: Feb 2008
722 IQ
#24
Quote by Hail
how do you know this chord isn't being played on a 6-string bass?!

...and if the keyboardist was comping out some C's with the left hand like yeah whatever...
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#25
why not "what if the singer's singing a c" or "what if the guitarist is mindlessly droning on a c cause that's all the guitar is good for"?

i'm eliminating musical prejudice here, buddy boy. levelin' the playing field. FWM nigga, i'm a hoodrat warrior
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
cdgraves
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
43 IQ
#26
A chord all by itself doesn't beg for inversion. Whether it's a Eb/G or Gmb6 depends on what else happens. You have to name it for what you hear, not what triad formulas say. Inversions have function beyond naming chords; they show movement in the bass. If the bass doesn't move, you can't assume it's an inversion. Inversions are, for all intents and purposes, not tonic harmonies, so it's hard to say something is in the key of Eb if the bass never actually touches the note.
Hail
i'm a mean bully
Join date: Jan 2010
431 IQ
#27
occam's razor

or you could have just done like i'm surprised 5+ people didn't do and just say "what's the context" and provide no more use than to annoy TS as is appropriate
Quote by theogonia777
Hail killed MT

Quote by jongtr
I want to be Hail when I grow up.
cdgraves
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2013
43 IQ
#28
Quote by Hail
occam's razor

or you could have just done like i'm surprised 5+ people didn't do and just say "what's the context" and provide no more use than to annoy TS as is appropriate


Right, but Eb/G is not the simplest answer because it implies a lot of information that isn't present - namely, motion of the bass and any other chords.

I don't see you asking for context, either, so I don't think that's a very good grounds for making an assumption one way or the other. Why should we assume that the bass is in motion rather than the upper voice?

Even in common practice music such a chord is easily analyzed as a 6-5 suspension if the upper voice resolves downward. There's no need to analyze every combination of 3 notes as a different harmony unless they actually function as such. A chord is labeled for what it actually does in the music, not simply what notes are in it. If that G does anything other than move to Ab or F, it's hard to justify calling it a I6. Music theory is not a spelling bee.

If you really want some context, "picked up my guitar and played a random chord" is not the context you typically find common practice voice leading in play. The guy asked precisely because it didn't sound like a simple major triad. "Gloomy" should be a give away that the minor 3rd stuck out to his ears, and a 6-5 suspension Gm sounds a lot gloomier than a chord that's about to move to IV.