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dark Mass
ZORK
Join date: Oct 2009
523 IQ
#81
Quote by Spaz91
What are its properties?


How come?

I'd like to see more basswood basses, the stigma needs to go. Personally I like the idea of a guitar or bass that sounds like my playing and the pickups I choose rather than a piece of wood.

Bell brass is softer than nickel silver and stainless steel. It requires less force to press in and to pull out for refret jobs.

EDIT:Wenge is quite notorious for chipping during refrets.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
Last edited by dark Mass at Jan 8, 2013,
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#83
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It scores 1820 on the Janka scale, so it's harder than the rosewoods. It can splinter whilst being worked and wears down tools, but will take finishes quite well. They make baseball bats from hickory, so should work well as a neck wood, but also be hard enough to work as an unfinished fingerboard wood.

Plus hickory smoked meat is awesome, so if you had a hickory neck or fingerboard, in the event your bass was broken you could have a barbeque!
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Sliide90027
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#84
Spaz,

Me happier with my Basswood 456, 455, and 405 MIK BTB's than the MIJ Mahogany Core 1006 Fretless.

Since Fretless is supposed to be more like a DBV, flatwounds on it work out just fine.(Bought it on-line unplayed, just trusted the moment.)

I really should be quiet, because I talked at the other forum about my PB-1 too much to draw people out to talk about what their recent experience was. They went up from $200 used to over $400 on some deals on ebay.

Did the same on BP-8's, have not seen a single one on Ebay or even craigslist since before Christmas. I will expect them to start commanding more money too. (Glad I have my two. One is nothing, two is everything.)

I have started to see the same with the Basswood 400 series. I got into a 405 NEW at $300 or $395, I don't remember, in 2006. They want more than that for them used now.

I suppose we see eye to eye on the whole exotic wood craze. I am fine with Ornamental Tops on Basswood.

Still Fender could make all of their future instruments out of it, and I would not look at them. I would have to get a Status Neck to get me on to a Fender, and it would have to have thin aspects like the BTB.

I think that is strange coming from a DBV Player. Buy Hey! This is a Guitar.
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Last edited by Sliide90027 at Jan 8, 2013,
John Swift
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Join date: May 2004
899 IQ
#85
Quote by dark Mass
Pau ferro causes allergic reaction in eyes and skin. It's also a sensitizer meaning the more you use it the more you react to it.

I hate working with the stuff since I break out in hives and rashes on hands and neck.


Do they give you a bell to ring with instructions to shout unclean when you go out?
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FatalGear41
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#86
Quote by John Swift
Do they give you a bell to ring with instructions to shout unclean when you go out?


No, but I'll bet there's an iPhone app for that.
"Drinking is a skill and should be recognized as such!"

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FatalGear41 knows the ways of the obscure. I hear it's just not with Gibsons. Beware, Halloween approaches...


Quote by Spaz91
DAMNIT FATALGEAR YOU RUINED MUH FLOW!
kangaxxter
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#87
When you look at the prevailing trends throughout the past 60 plus years and in modern music, isn't the question really; Are any basses besides Fender relevant? In a market dominated by a couple of models and copies thereof, really nothing besides the P and J basses (and their copies) has ever had the lasting and enduring impact of these electric basses.
Actually, I go by Dave, but there are already too many Daves on this forum.


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Spanner93
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#88
Quote by kangaxxter
When you look at the prevailing trends throughout the past 60 plus years and in modern music, isn't the question really; Are any basses besides Fender relevant? In a market dominated by a couple of models and copies thereof, really nothing besides the P and J basses (and their copies) has ever had the lasting and enduring impact of these electric basses.


Not really true, Hofner Violin basses, Rickenbackers etc. are just as relevant (and longlasting). Fender just trades on its name nowadays, there product really don't seem to be anything that special anymore.
Quote by Karl Marx
Reason has always existed, but not always in a reasonable form.
Alucard817
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#89
Quote by Spanner93
Not really true, Hofner Violin basses, Rickenbackers etc. are just as relevant (and longlasting). Fender just trades on its name nowadays, there product really don't seem to be anything that special anymore.

The Hofner violin/viola bass is more a curiosity anymore, since the only big musician to play one ( That I can remember) is Sir Paul McCartney.
Even now the only average person I see playing them are those who want a Beatles sound.
Quote by FatalGear41
In the end, the only question is: what bass would Jesus play?

I think he's a Fender Jazz guy.
John Swift
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#90
Quote by Alucard817
The Hofner violin/viola bass is more a curiosity anymore, since the only big musician to play one ( That I can remember) is Sir Paul McCartney.
Even now the only average person I see playing them are those who want a Beatles sound.


What people seem not to be aware of is that when Macca started out and bought the Violin Bass it was a price and availabilty issue.
When we went looking round local music stores at the end of the 50s into the early 60s the UK was still going through the hangover of WWII.
There was an abundance of low price instruments but the top end ie Fender, Gibson, Gretsch, Guild etc usually had to be ordered.
In the UK in 1962 a Fender Jazz Bass cost around £170 GBP when the basic wage was only £10 pw which by comparrison is over £2,000 today.
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#91
Quote by kangaxxter
When you look at the prevailing trends throughout the past 60 plus years and in modern music, isn't the question really; Are any basses besides Fender relevant? In a market dominated by a couple of models and copies thereof, really nothing besides the P and J basses (and their copies) has ever had the lasting and enduring impact of these electric basses.

While Fender and Fender style copies/clones may have dominated the market for the most part, it isn't true in the slightest that other basses aren't relevant, especially when many simply don't have the merit of being as old.

Alembic's pioneering work with active electronics is certainly relevant to modern bassists, Modulus's work with carbon fiber (which also translates into the stiffening rods common to many wood necks now), Ned Steinberger's concern for the ergonomics of a bass guitar (in both the NS body design a la Spector and his own designs at Steinberger), Warwick's exploration of exotic tonewoods, the list of relevant innovations goes on. Then there's designs like the Rickenbacker 4001/4003, the Gibson Thunderbird, and Leo's later creations at Music Man and G&L. There's plenty of designs and innovations that are relevant to bass guitars and bassists today, even if they're not the "old standard."
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Spaz91
RIP Terry
Join date: Mar 2008
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#92
Quote by Alucard817
The Hofner violin/viola bass is more a curiosity anymore, since the only big musician to play one ( That I can remember) is Sir Paul McCartney.
Even now the only average person I see playing them are those who want a Beatles sound.

I was in the market for a short scale and I saw one of these going cheap, the only reason I didn't get it was the thought of people assuming me to be a Macca clone.
Quote by kangaxxter
When you look at the prevailing trends throughout the past 60 plus years and in modern music, isn't the question really; Are any basses besides Fender relevant? In a market dominated by a couple of models and copies thereof, really nothing besides the P and J basses (and their copies) has ever had the lasting and enduring impact of these electric basses.

The original post is about whether these "copies" have surpassed Fender. Old trends aren't relevant any more, dial-up was the shit before broadband came along.

To summarize what I've said so far in this thread, I believe Fender to be, for the most part, way off the mark when it comes to price:features (particularly the made in Mexico models.) They aren't marketed as beginner basses so they should have reinforced necks and high mass bridges, these are the standards today. Pickups, active electronics and extended range are all subjective but you can see where corners have been cut on Mexican and some Japanese models. Personally, I think the Highway 1 series was the ideal (possibly the American Special, I've yet to try it) and many competing brands do the same combination of outsourced manufacturing followed by a professional setup in their home factory. (See Skyline, Electra and possibly the Tribute series.)
fudger
Im a ninja of love..
Join date: Feb 2008
647 IQ
#93
Quote by Alucard817
The Hofner violin/viola bass is more a curiosity anymore, since the only big musician to play one ( That I can remember) is Sir Paul McCartney.
Even now the only average person I see playing them are those who want a Beatles sound.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgyHqJ4U1UE
Funky Hofner for the win, brought to us by a bass God. If I ever got one it was because of this.
Spanner93
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
333 IQ
#95
Quote by Spaz91
^ That's pretty cool. You can't get that E string growl on anything but a short scale.


Hell yeah, that is cool. Anyway, a well eg'd Hofner is imo the nicest semi-acoustic sound a bass can make.
Quote by Karl Marx
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Alucard817
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Join date: May 2010
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#96
Quote by fudger
{youtube video}
Funky Hofner for the win, brought to us by a bass God. If I ever got one it was because of this.

That is a funky sounding Hofner.
Quote by FatalGear41
In the end, the only question is: what bass would Jesus play?

I think he's a Fender Jazz guy.
fudger
Im a ninja of love..
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647 IQ
#97
Yeah I know, it helps that Chris Wood is the one behind it though. Proves it can be used for more than just Mccartney displays on it
John Swift
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#98
Quote by fudger
Yeah I know, it helps that Chris Wood is the one behind it though. Proves it can be used for more than just Mccartney displays on it


Plus added effects like compression/limiting.
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Spaz91
RIP Terry
Join date: Mar 2008
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#99
Quote by John Swift
Plus added effects like compression/limiting.

My EB0 (again) sounds like a woolly turd when its clean, add a multiband compressor to the mix and bam, awesomesauce. It actually sounds a bit like a cheap Stringray or Warwick $$.
dethfield
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Join date: Sep 2008
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#100
This is kind of a funny subject for me, because for a long time i much preferred things like Ibanez 5 and 6 strings, and generally avoided Fender because the few i played were really to my liking. Eventually though, i tried some newer P-basses, and after a year of debating, i never looked back. Now i pretty much just rotate between 3 p-basses.

To say fender has been "overtaken" design wise, i think, is immature. You are all correct when you say fender has not changed their design much in the last 40-50 years. But there is a reason.. because it works. It works well. Consider thing the following:

1) The vast majority of bass recordings in the last 60 years have been with a fender bass of some sort. Now, plenty of other options have sprung up since the introduction of the P-bass and even Jazz bass, but fenders have continued to be very common. Why? Because they sound great, and they sound great for multiple genres. One of the many cases of "dont fix what isnt broke."

2) Building on that, bass designs from other companies share more with Fender designs than you may think. Hell, alot of the "soapbar" pickups you see on basses are actually just split coil pickups being housed in a soapbar case. The "strat shape" that fender designed is vastly more common (in many variations) in the bass market than other shapes, because balance is even more important and tricky than on guitar. And while some non-fender bass designs might STILL drop the ball on balance and comfort, if you buy a Fender you can bet your arse it wont neckdive on you. Again, "dont fix what aint broke."

3) Fenders are available everywhere. Which is more important than you think. If a musician is touring, and for some reason his fender bass becomes unusable, it will be very easy to find a replacement. Along with this, parts for Fenders are also everywhere, so replacing and customizing parts on your Fender is very easy to do, and to do it quickly.

4) Also, Fenders all have a very modular design. Parts are all very standardized, and very easy to replace or upgrade, which also makes Fenders very appealing to those who like to mod their instruments.

5) As for the pricing, i dont agree with those who say Fenders are overpriced. MIM's are not only great instruments (its been widely acknowledged that the MIM quality has shot way up since 2008), but for a price of around $500, are a great value. Hell my favourite bass is a MIM arctic white P-bass, and i dare say, it sounds just a little better than my 2011 MIA P-bass!

The MIA's i believe, may be a tad overpriced, and the only reason i bought mine was because it was used and was in min condition. Having said that, buying an American Fender wont exactly clean out your wallet, especially when compared to more "boutique"companies who charge $2000+ for what is essentially a slightly improved Fender copy.
Spanner93
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#101
Quote by dethfield

1) The vast majority of bass recordings in the last 60 years have been with a fender bass of some sort. Now, plenty of other options have sprung up since the introduction of the P-bass and even Jazz bass, but fenders have continued to be very common. Why? Because they sound great, and they sound great for multiple genres. One of the many cases of "dont fix what isnt broke."

2) Building on that, bass designs from other companies share more with Fender designs than you may think. Hell, alot of the "soapbar" pickups you see on basses are actually just split coil pickups being housed in a soapbar case. The "strat shape" that fender designed is vastly more common (in many variations) in the bass market than other shapes, because balance is even more important and tricky than on guitar. And while some non-fender bass designs might STILL drop the ball on balance and comfort, if you buy a Fender you can bet your arse it wont neckdive on you. Again, "dont fix what aint broke."

3) Fenders are available everywhere. Which is more important than you think. If a musician is touring, and for some reason his fender bass becomes unusable, it will be very easy to find a replacement. Along with this, parts for Fenders are also everywhere, so replacing and customizing parts on your Fender is very easy to do, and to do it quickly.

4) Also, Fenders all have a very modular design. Parts are all very standardized, and very easy to replace or upgrade, which also makes Fenders very appealing to those who like to mod their instruments.

5) As for the pricing, i dont agree with those who say Fenders are overpriced. MIM's are not only great instruments (its been widely acknowledged that the MIM quality has shot way up since 2008), but for a price of around $500, are a great value. Hell my favourite bass is a MIM arctic white P-bass, and i dare say, it sounds just a little better than my 2011 MIA P-bass!

The MIA's i believe, may be a tad overpriced, and the only reason i bought mine was because it was used and was in min condition. Having said that, buying an American Fender wont exactly clean out your wallet, especially when compared to more "boutique"companies who charge $2000+ for what is essentially a slightly improved Fender copy.


None of these reasons are anything more but your opinion, and for every point you raise, there are many against it.

1) They aren't as common now as they once were. There are now many viable options that are used instead. Other companies have now actually pretty much perfected the "fender" design, and fender haven't bothered to change a damn thing.

2) It's all relative to what the customer wants. I for example have never had any issues with Thunderbirds (even though many people complain about the neck-dive) whereas I find the Jaguar extremely uncomfortable.

3) If the internet didn't exist, you'd be right. But in this wonderful age of being able to buy anything anywhere, that just isn't true. Pretty much every shop that stocks fenders also stock Ibanez, Gibson etc.

4) Yet again, you can get anything you want for whatever bass, as long as you have the know-how to implement it. I have no problems whatsoever finding parts for my Peavey, nor did I have problems finding bits for my old Ibby when I had it.

5) In the States they may be reasonably priced, here in Europe however you are looking at 550eur and upwards for a MIM and 1500eur+ for a MIA. For that you could have a decent Warwick, a high end Ibanez or a Gibson and still have leftover cash.
Quote by Karl Marx
Reason has always existed, but not always in a reasonable form.
Last edited by Spanner93 at Jan 18, 2013,
John Swift
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#102
Quote by Spanner93
In the States they may be reasonably priced, here in Europe however you are looking at 550eur and upwards for a MIM and 1500eur+ for a MIA. For that you could have a decent Warwick, a high end Ibanez or a Gibson and still have leftover cash.


Things are overpriced this side of the pond and much more to the point with no real justification.
In 1999 I saved £500 GBP on a Musicman Stingray 5 that I brought back to the UK, it doesn't cost £500 pounds each instrument to ship a container full to the UK.

I contacted Messa about the overpricing of their Walkabout Scout combo in the UK, they weren't interested when I even pointed out how popular they would be at a realistic price as used Walkabouts were more expensive in the UK than new in the US
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anarkee
oh the horror!
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#103
John there's only one solution to that. You need to come visit me, we go up to Petaluma, meet with Mesa Boogie, convince them in person and then we go and celebrate over a beer at the Laguintas Brewery just down the street.

And yes, what you pay for American made musical product on your side of the pond is horrendous.
Sudaka
Novice Bass Player
Join date: Sep 2008
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#104
Quote by anarkee
And yes, what you pay for American made musical product on your side of the pond is horrendous.

I'm on this side of the pond, just a little to the south, and the prices we pay for American and/or European instruments is still more horrendous. Imagine that if I could buy a fender Jazz at the price you pay in Europe, it would be super cheap for me... :S
Quote by FatalGear41
When you break a bass string, that snapping sound is the sound of six dollars going down the crapper.



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#105
Quote by dethfield

5) As for the pricing, i dont agree with those who say Fenders are overpriced. MIM's are not only great instruments (its been widely acknowledged that the MIM quality has shot way up since 2008), but for a price of around $500, are a great value. Hell my favourite bass is a MIM arctic white P-bass, and i dare say, it sounds just a little better than my 2011 MIA P-bass!

Just a correction, MIM Standards are right around $600 new in the US. Other MIMs like the deluxes, roadworns, and classic series are even more.
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JELIFISH19
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#106
Quote by Spanner93

There are now many viable options that are used instead. Other companies have now actually pretty much perfected the "fender" design, and fender haven't bothered to change a damn thing.


1) What does perfected mean? You mean change things that people don't want to be changed? Fender has a lot more "bad" designs in the guitar range than their bass range. They have things like noisy pickups, obstructive neck heels, bad bridge designs, and many other things. But fans of Jazzmasters or Jaguars would freak out if they "perfected" the design. And Fender knows it has it's fans. They don't need to try to one-up any other company. If you want something else other than a Fender, then don't get a Fender. If you want a Fender, get a Fender.